Everywhere, Everyone: from Curation to Services
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Everywhere, Everyone: from Curation to Services

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Peter Brantley talks about how digital contents delivery in STM publishing is changing.

Peter Brantley talks about how digital contents delivery in STM publishing is changing.

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    Everywhere, Everyone: from Curation to Services Everywhere, Everyone: from Curation to Services Presentation Transcript

    • peter  brantley          if  book  then  internet  archive        2012  summer  edition  san  francisco  ca        milan,  italty  
    •  The  internet  is  the  largest  public  works   project  that  the  world  has  ever  seen.  
    • The  future  of  all  publishing  is  increasingly  defined  by  efforts  of  technology  firms,  not    by  publishers.    
    •  Apple,  Amazon,  Google,  MSFT  present   comprehensive,  proprietary  consumer-­‐ facing  content  distribution  platforms.  
    •  These  U.S.  west  coast  firms  have  created   content  catalogs  (iTunes,  Google  Play)   spanning  films,  games,  music,  and  books,   supported  by  mobile  OS  (iOS,  Android,     Win  8),  with  tablets  and  mobile  phones.    
    •  These  silos  exist  because  …  of  the  web.      These  companies  (at  heart)  are  network   platforms  that  rely  on  the  monetization   of  web  traffic.  
    •  In  publishing,  post  20  years  of  “network   industrialization,”  the  web  enables  new   forms  of  content  to  be  developed,  and   new  authoring  platforms  to  be  created.    
    • IDPF,    W3C,  and  the  Readium  Project:    Standards  organization  collaborate  to   deliver  browser-­‐based  reading.    
    • Platform  level  collaborative  authoring,  sophisticated  content  management.  e.g.  Inkling  Habitat  and        Nature  Education  Interactive  Textbooks  
    • Rapid  advances  in  authoring  systems  permit  multimedia  writing  with  little  technical  expertise  
    • Examples  include:       Aerbook  Maker       Vook       Pressbooks       The  Atavist.  
    • Readlists  from  Arc90    A  Readlist  is  a  group  of  web  pages—articles,   recipes,  course  materials,  anything—bundled   into  an  e-­‐book  you  can  send  to  your  Kindle,   iPad,  or  iPhone.  
    • STM  increasingly  “push  to  publish”:  WordPress  :  Annotum  >  PLoS  Currents      An  open-­‐source,  open-­‐process,  open-­‐access   scholarly  authoring  and  publishing  platform   based  on  WordPress  
    •  Expensive  commercial  publishing   infrastructures  are  out  of  date,  and   affordances  no  longer  as  valued.    
    • “…  [t]o  shut  down  the  operating  system  of   print-­‐organized  scholarly  research  and   communication.”        -­‐  Jerome  McGann,  Profession  2011,  pp.  182–195  (14)  
    • PeerJ  (Peter  Binfield,  Jason  Hoyt):      $99,  $169,  $259  lifetime  membership.    Scholars  must  contribute  annually  in  review,   comment,  or  submission  to  maintain  status.      
    • Easy  to  play  in  the  “adult”  world:    Has  an  ISSN,  will  assign  DOIs,  use  ORCID.      Will  archive  in  CLOCKSS,  PubMedCentral.  
    •  “…  [w]e  have  a  new  type  of  publication  model   which  allows  us  to  knowingly  strip  out  what  is   extraneous  to  the  process  of  publication,   allowing  us  to  pass  those  savings  back  to  the   customers  (the  authors).”        -­‐  Pete  Binfield,  PeerJ            http://scienceblogs.com/confessions/2012/06/12/interview-­‐with-­‐peter-­‐binfield-­‐and-­‐jason-­‐hoyt-­‐of-­‐peerj/  
    •  Gold  Open  Access,  CC-­‐BY,      authors  retain  copyright.      PloS  One,  Hindawi,  BMC,  PeerJ,  but  also   supported  by  mainstream  publishers  e.g.   Springer.    
    •  Re-­‐consideration  of  curation,  peer  review.      Open  submission  over  selection  (PLoS  One,   PeerJ,  arXiv).    Open  peer  review  over  closed   (BMC,  PeerJ).      “Altmetrics”  used  to  define  worth.    
    •  “Biggest  development  in  scholarly   communication  isnt  a  [business]  model  but   rather  the  sense  that  its  impossible  to   judge  importance  ahead  of  time”      -­‐  Dan  Cohen,  Center  for  History  and  New  Media          https://twitter.com/dancohen/status/212717007802601473  
    •  Arguably  the  ultimate  measure  of  success  for   a  journal  such  as  PLoS  One  is  to  put  itself  out   of  business.      Every  academic  dept  …  its  own  journal.    
    •  “We  believe  that  the  need  for  PeerJ,  or  any   other  publisher,  in  the  future  will  be  to   provide  tools  and  services  that  genuinely  add   value  to  the  end-­‐to-­‐end  publishing  process   …”        -­‐  Pete  Binfield,  PeerJ    http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-­‐topic/digital/content-­‐and-­‐e-­‐books/article/52512-­‐scholarly-­‐publishing-­‐2012-­‐meet-­‐peerj.html  
    •  Easy  to  marry  institutional  “Green”  OA   repositories  with  new  publishing  tools.    arXiv    :  physical  sciences    SSRN    :  social  sciences,  law    philpapers    :  philosophy    RePEc    :  economics    
    •  With  web  based  tools  and  services,      network  based  economies  …    academic/research  publishing  can  “detox”  the  system  of  the  money  that  now  runs  it.  
    •  Maybe  a  5-­‐10  year  transition  to  ease  out   subventions  and  migrate  to  community-­‐   based  publishing.  
    • Every  university,  its  own  publishing  platform.  Every  author,  their  own  publishing  tools.    
    • peter  brantley      director,  bookserver  project      internet  archive      @naypinya  (twitter,  gmail)