Forest Trends is working in thirteen countries to track REDD+ finance from donors to in-country recipients to REDD+ projec...
The REDDX Initiative
Over US$7.3 billion has been pledged to support REDD+ readiness in the run up to 2015, with US$4.3 bi...
•	 Ecuador: Ecuador is reported to have one of the highest deforestation rates in South America at 1.43% per year. The cou...
Total commitments for REDD+ activities in Ecuador amounted to US$320,216 in 2009, increasing by US$248,000 in 2010 to reac...
Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Ecuador highlights that most donor institutions are funding one type of recipient....
The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed by the end of 201...
To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institution receiving the fu...
The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list of activities and defini...
BRAZIL
Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing
Total commitments increased from US$134.7m in 2009 to US$353.6m in 2010, reaching U...
BRAZIL
Emerging Results - Flows of Finance
Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Brazil highlights that donor government...
BRAZIL
Donors
The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed by ...
BRAZIL
Recipients
To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institutio...
BRAZIL
REDD+ Activities
The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list ...
VIETNAM
Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing
$ 12,377,742
2009 2010 2011
$ 578,935
$ 13,723,278
$ 20,013,083
$ 4,905,485
$ 8,43...
VIETNAM
Emerging Results - Flows of Finance
Donors Recipients
$ 4,591,957
$ 861,471
$ 14,559,655 $10,981,743
Government of...
VIETNAM
Donors
The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed th...
VIETNAM
Recipients
Funds committed
to Vietnam
(2009-2011)
International Institutions
$ 10,981,743
Government of Vietnam
$ ...
VIETNAM
REDD+ Activities
The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list...
GHANA
Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing
Total cumulative commitments increased from US$1.8m in 2009 to US$14.2m in 2010, rea...
GHANA
Emerging Results - Flows of Finance
Donors Recipients
$ 4,508,716
$ 601,372
$ 9,215,798 $12,408,716
Government of Gh...
GHANA
Donors
Darker shades represent
portion already disbursed
Government Agency
Multilateral Institution
Private Foundati...
GHANA
Recipients
Funds committed
to Ghana
(2009-2011)
$12,408,716
Government of Ghana
Ghanaian Institutions
International ...
GHANA
REDD+ Activities
The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list o...
EMERGING GLOBAL PICTURE
SOURCE: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2012. Ecosystem Marketplace; REDDX Project, Forest Trad...
REDDX Looking Forward
Next Step for REDDX:
REDDX is now shifting focus to tracking finance from donors and initial recipie...
Project Supported by:
REDDX - Tracking Forest Finance
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REDDX - Tracking Forest Finance

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Um grupo de organizações, lideradas pelo Forest trends, está trabalhando em 13 países para mapear os fluxos financeiros de REDD+ desde os doadores até a implementação local dos projetos.

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REDDX - Tracking Forest Finance

  1. 1. Forest Trends is working in thirteen countries to track REDD+ finance from donors to in-country recipients to REDD+ projects on the ground.
  2. 2. The REDDX Initiative Over US$7.3 billion has been pledged to support REDD+ readiness in the run up to 2015, with US$4.3 billion to be spent in the period between 2010 and 2012. Yet, despite high-level multilateral and bilateral or government financial commitments, information remains limited on exactly how much of this money is actually flowing to the national level, the types of REDD+ activities supported in this Fast Start period, and the organizations managing and actually implementing these activities. Forest Trends (with funding from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety’s International Climate Initiative, the Skoll Foundation and the Rights and Resources Initiative) is tracking REDD+ finance in thirteen countries to determine: • Actual commitments and disbursements of REDD+ finance; • Timelines between when funds are committed and actually disbursed; • The types of organizations receiving and implementing the REDD+ activities (e.g. government, NGOs, large international consulting firms and consultants, or community organizations); • Types of activities supported by the current financial pledges. • The aim of this initiative is to provide information that will help governments and other REDD+ stakeholders better assess gaps and needs against national REDD+ strategies and to have a better understanding of the financial flows associated with REDD+ financing.
  3. 3. • Ecuador: Ecuador is reported to have one of the highest deforestation rates in South America at 1.43% per year. The country has prioritized lowering its deforestation rate through a number of national policies. Ecuador’s Ministry of the Environment launched the Socio Bosque Program in 2008 to incentivize the protection of forests, and in 2009, the country’s Plan for Good Living set a national goal to reduce deforestation by 30% by 2013. Ecuador has seen support for its initiatives from the UN-REDD Programme – after Ecuador became a beneficiary country in 2011 – and other international, multilateral and bilateral commitments. The coun- try has also seen an increasing amount of private sector investment. • Brazil: Brazil is the largest country in South America and the fifth largest and most populous in the world. Forests cover about three-fifths of Brazil’s land area, which represents over 14% of the world’s forest coverage, including one-third of the world’s remaining rainforests. Despite the fact that the deforestation rate in the Brazilian Amazon has decreased in the last decade, defor- estation continues to be a major issue. Currently, five of the Amazon states are a part of the Governor’s Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF). The goal of the GCF is to connect these states and the fourteen others in the partnership with market and non-mar- ket finance. Brazil is currently in the process of developing a national REDD strategy. • Vietnam: Since the 1990s, Vietnam has seen an increase in forest cover totaling 40% of the country by 2010. Specific regions still have high deforestation rates, which Vietnam is working to lower through a number of multilateral agreements and national poli- cies that support REDD+ activities. The country’s 2008 National Target Program to Respond to Climate Change seeks to evaluate the impact of climate change on Vietnam, and build the capacity of relevant organizations. In November 2010, Vietnam presented its REDD Readiness Preparation Proposal (R-PP) to the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) to obtain support through the FCPF’s Readiness Fund. In late 2012, the country began the UN-REDD Programme’s implementation phase, which aims to reduce emissions in six Vietnamese provinces • Ghana: Ghana is reported to have one of the highest deforestation rates in Africa at around 2% per year. To combat this loss, Ghana is in the process of building a national strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from forest loss and degradation, with the support of the World Bank´s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and Forest Investment Program (FIP) as well as private donors.Ghana developed a REDD Readiness Preparation Note (R-PIN) which was approved in July 2008 and a REDD Readiness Preparation Proposal (R-PP) which was signed in August 2009. More recently, Ghana produced a draft investment plan for the FIP which was published in August 2012. This FIP funding will be reported as part of the 2012 data later this year. • REDD+ data coming in 2013: Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guyana, Indonesia, Liberia, Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Peru and Tanzania. REDDX Countries Ecuador, Brazil, Vietnam, Ghana 2
  4. 4. Total commitments for REDD+ activities in Ecuador amounted to US$320,216 in 2009, increasing by US$248,000 in 2010 to reach a cumulative total of US$568,216. In 2011, commitments increased by a dramatic 3,520% to reach US$20,572,255. Disbursements of funds have been slow with just 2.3% (or $467,530) released by the end of 2011. $ 320,216 2009 2010 2011 $ 43,000 $ 187,000 $ 20,572,255 $ 568,216 $ 467,530 13.4% 32.9% 2.3% Funds committed Proportion of funds committed already disbursed ECUADOR Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing Cumulative commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 3 Our In-Country Partner
  5. 5. Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Ecuador highlights that most donor institutions are funding one type of recipient. These exclusive flows of finance are from donor governments to the government of Ecuador, private foundations to international institutions, the private sector to Ecuadorian institutions, and supranational institutions to international institutions. Multilateral institutions have committed funds to both Latin American institutions – including regional NGOs and community groups spanning several Latin American countries – and international institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions – with 95% of these funds directed to international institutions. ECUADOR Emerging Results - Flows of Finance Donors Recipients $ 4,217,859 $ 248,000 $ 15,350,180 $15,350,180 $ 4,804,215 $ 200,000 $ 217,860 $ 156,216 $ 436,000 Government of Ecuador Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations Ecuadorian Institutions International Institutions Supranational Institutions Grouped Confidential Latin American Institutions Private Sector $ 164,000 Flows of REDD+ finance between donors and recipients, 2009-2011 4
  6. 6. The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed by the end of 2011. The percentage of committed funding that has been disbursed varies from 0% to 58%, with an average of 16% disbursement. ECUADOR Donors Darker shades represent portion already disbursed Government Agency Multilateral Financing Institution Private Foundation Funds committed Funds disbursed UN-REDD $ 3,999,999 $ 0 KfW (Germany) $ 15,350,180 $ 167,530 Moore F. $ 248,000 $ 144,000 Private Sector Face the Future $ 164,000 $ 37,000 European Union European Union $ 156,216 $ 6,000 Grouped Confidential $ 436,000 $ 113,000 IDB * $ 217,860 $ 0 * $ 41,400 co-financing by recipient (COICA) Proportional total donor commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 Darker shades represent portion already disbursed 5
  7. 7. To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institution receiving the funding. This so-called “first recipient” will have a legal or formal agreement with the donor specifying the total amount of funding, a timeline for activities and a schedule for when finance will be spent. The first recipients to receive funding for REDD+ activities in Ecuador are predominantly based in Ecuador. 74.6% of funds committed in the period from 2009 to 2011 have been directed towards funding REDD+ activities through the government of Ecuador, namely the Ministry of the Environment (MAE). Ecuadorian institutions – including Ecuadorian NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups – are scheduled to receive an additional 1% of the funding from donors, along with Latin American institutions, which include regional NGOs and community groups spanning several Latin American countries. International institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions – are scheduled to receive 23.4% of the total funds committed for REDD+ funding in Ecuador. ECUADOR Recipients Funds committed to Ecuador (2009-2011) $ 15,350,180 Government of Ecuador Ecuadorian Institutions International Institutions 74.6% $ 200,000 1% $ 4,804,215 23.4% 1% LatinAmericanInstitutions $ 217,860 Commitments to first recipients by location and type 6
  8. 8. The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list of activities and definitions was drawn from broad agreement among REDD+ experts, including the civil society national partners collecting data across the initiative countries. It is important to note that the absence of support for an activity from a specific donor type does not constitute a lack of attention to the activity overall, since the activity could be well-funded through other donor types. In Ecuador, the activities supported by the greatest number of donors were monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) and reference levels, as well as safeguards – each receiving funds from four donor types. ECUADOR REDD+ Activities Stakeholder engagement Rights and Tenure MRV and reference levels Safeguards Policy & law analysis; REDD strategy Institutional strengthening Forest carbon project design Forest and land management Carbon Offsets and perf.-based payments Other Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X European Union Private Sector X X X X X X X √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √√ √ √√X X X X X X X REDD+ Activities 7
  9. 9. BRAZIL Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing Total commitments increased from US$134.7m in 2009 to US$353.6m in 2010, reaching US$598.6m in 2011. Disbursements have in- creased at a relatively consistent rate in the same period, amounting to 29.9% of total cumulative commitments in 2010 and 29.4% of total REDD+ financing tracked by the end of 2011. $ 33,239,135 2009 2010 2011 $ 134,716,212 $ 353,628,894 $ 598,604,833 $ 105,889,939 $ 175,789,389 24.7% 29.9% 29.4% Funds committed Proportion of funds committed already disbursed Cumulative commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 8 Our In-Country Partner
  10. 10. BRAZIL Emerging Results - Flows of Finance Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Brazil highlights that donor government agencies are funding every recipient type with the highest proportion of funding directed to the Amazon Fund (managed by the Brazilian Development Bank, BNDES). Multilateral institutions have directed funding exclusively to the government of Brazil, while the public-private sector has exclusively funded the public-private sector – namely, the Amazon Fund. Private foundations have directed around 20% of their commitments to international institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic in- stitutions – as well as international consultancies between 2009 and 2011. Over 80% of private foundation commitments have been directed toward Brazilian institutions – including Brazilian NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups. Donors Recipients $ 20,300,000 $ 28,154,314 $ 545,940,164 $78,431,138 $ 11,984,343 $ 23,233,044 $ 886,953 $ 4,210,355 $ 484,069,355 Government of Brazil Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations Brazilian Institutions International Institutions Public-Private Sector InternationalConsultancies Flows of REDD+ finance between donors and recipients, 2009-2011 9
  11. 11. BRAZIL Donors The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed by the end of 2011. This percentage of committed funding that has been disbursed varies from 12% to 100%. Brazil is the only country in the REDD X initiative to show a significant number of donors with 100% disbursal rates. NORAD (Norway) $ 446,921,500 $ 52,170,806 KfW (Germany) $ 62,581,250 $ 38,866,250 USAID (USA) $ 6,500,000 $ 6,500,000 FCO (UK) $ 1,611,165 $ 1,611,165 GIZ (Germany) $ 28,326,250 $ 28,326,250 World Bank (UK funding) $ 16,000,000 $ 16,000,000 UNEP (Norway funding) $ 4,300,000 $ 4,300,000 Climate Works $ 9,896,381 $ 8,357,465 Packard $ 4,337,361 $ 4,337,361 Ford $ 2,368,000 $ 2,368,000 Moore $ 11,552,572 $ 8,741,737 Petrobras $ 4,210,355 $ 4,210,355 Darker shades represent portion already disbursed Government Agency Multilateral Institution Private Foundation Funds committed Funds disbursed Public-Private Sector Proportional total donor commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 Darker shades represent portion already disbursed 10 Norway
  12. 12. BRAZIL Recipients To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institution receiving the funding. This so-called “first recipient” will have a legal or formal agreement with the donor specifying the total amount of funding, a timeline for activities and a schedule for when finance will be spent. The first recipients receiving funding for REDD+ activities in Brazil are predominantly based in Brazil. 80.9% of funds committed in the period from 2009 to 2011 has been channeled through the Amazon Fund. The government of Brazil – namely, the Ministry of Environment (MMA) – is scheduled to receive an additional 13.1% of the funding from donors, while Brazilian institutions – includ- ing Brazilian NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups –will receive 3.9% of total commitments. International institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions – are scheduled to receive 2% of the total funds committed for REDD+ funding in Brazil, and international consultancies 0.15%. Funds committed to Brazil (2009-2011) $ 78,431,138 Government of Brazil 3.9% Brazilian Institutions $ 23,233,044 International Institutions $ 11,984,343 13.1% 2% InternationalConsultancies $ 886,953 Amazon Fund $ 484,069,35580.9% 0.15% Commitments to first recipients by location and type 11
  13. 13. BRAZIL REDD+ Activities The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list of activities and definitions was drawn from broad agreement among REDD+ experts, including the civil society national partners collecting data across the initiative countries. It is important to note that the absence of support for an activity from a specific donor type does not constitute a lack of attention to the activity overall, since the activity could be well-funded through other donor types. In Brazil, the activities that received support from all donor types (governments, multilateral institutions, private foundations, and the public-private sector) were stakeholder engagement, rights and tenure, policy, law analysis and development, institutional strengthening, and the implementation of improved forest and land management. Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X X X XPublic-Private Sector √ √ √ √ X X X √ √ √ √ √ √ X X √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Stakeholder engagement Rights and Tenure MRV and reference levels Safeguards Policy & law analysis; REDD strategy Institutional strengthening Forest carbon project design Forest and land management Carbon Offsets and perf.-based payments Other REDD+ Activities 12
  14. 14. VIETNAM Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing $ 12,377,742 2009 2010 2011 $ 578,935 $ 13,723,278 $ 20,013,083 $ 4,905,485 $ 8,432,230 4.7% 35.8% 42.1% Funds committed Proportion of funds committed already disbursed Total commitments increased from US$12.4m in 2009 to US$13.8m in 2010, reaching US$20m in 2011. Disbursements have in- creased rapidly in the same period, amounting to 35.8% of total cumulative commitments in 2010 and reaching 42.1% of total REDD+ financing tracked by the end of 2011. Cumulative commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 13 Our In-Country Partner VIETNAM
  15. 15. VIETNAM Emerging Results - Flows of Finance Donors Recipients $ 4,591,957 $ 861,471 $ 14,559,655 $10,981,743 Government of Vietnam Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions European Union Vietnamese Institutions International Institutions $ 953,872 $ 8,012,467 $ 65,000 InternationalConsultancies Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Vietnam highlights that donor government agencies are funding the government of Vietnam, international institutions, and Vietnamese institutions, with the majority of funding directed towards international institutions. Multilaterals have directed over 95% of funding to the government of Vietnam, with 3% also supporting international institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions – and 1% funding Vietnamese institutions – including NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups. The European Union committed funds to both Vietnamese and international institutions between 2009 and 2011, providing a greater proportion of these funds (67%) to international institutions. Flows of REDD+ finance between donors and recipients, 2009-2011 14
  16. 16. VIETNAM Donors The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed through end of 2011. This percentage of committed funding that has been disbursed varies from 9% to 100%. However, the majority of donors have disbursement percentages greater than 50%, with an average of 56%. Funding from USAID is part of a regional program – LEAF, Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forests – spanning six countries, namely Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Papua New Guinea, and Malaysia. For the purpose of tracking REDD+ finance in Vietnam under this initiative, the total amount provided by USAID to the six countries was divided equally by six to represent an amount that approximates the support Vietnam is receiving from the donor. REDDX will seek to provide further detail in subsequent data updates on the amounts of regional funding actually flowing to Vietnam. Darker shades represent portion already disbursed Government Agency Multilateral Institution Funds committed Funds disbursed DEFRA (UK) $ 216,712 $ 144,770FORMIN (Finland) $ 501,589 $ 304,582 BMU (Germany) $ 2,084,106 $ 178,949 JICA (Japan) $ 6,400,000 $ 3,400,000 NORAD (Norway) $ 2,023,915 $ 954,188 USAID (USA)* $ 3,333,333 $ 448,358 IFAD $ 142,201 $ 117,201 UN-REDD $ 4,384,756 $ 2,557,811 World Bank $ 65,000 $ 65,000 European Union $ 861,471 $ 261,370 Supranational Institution * Regional program. Proportional total donor commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 Darker shades represent portion already disbursed 15 Norway
  17. 17. VIETNAM Recipients Funds committed to Vietnam (2009-2011) International Institutions $ 10,981,743 Government of Vietnam $ 8,012,467 International Consultancies $ 65,000 Vietnamese Institutions $ 953,872 0.3% 4.8% 54.9% 40% To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institution receiving the funding. This so-called “first recipient” will have a legal or formal agreement with the donor specifying the total amount of funding, a timeline for activities and a schedule for when finance will be spent. The first recipients receiving funding for REDD+ activities in Vietnam are predominantly based in Vietnam. 54.9% of funds commit- ted in the period from 2009 to 2011 have been directed to the government of Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Develop- ment (MARD). Vietnamese institutions – including NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups – are scheduled to receive an additional 4.8% of the funding from donors. International institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institu- tions – are scheduled to receive 40% of the total funds committed for REDD+ activities in Vietnam. Commitments to first recipients by location and type 16
  18. 18. VIETNAM REDD+ Activities The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list of activities and definitions was drawn from broad agreement among REDD+ experts, including the civil society national partners collecting data across the initiative countries. It is important to note that the absence of support for an activity from a specific donor type does not constitute a lack of attention to the activity overall, since the activity could be well-funded through other donor types. In Vietnam, the activities that received support from all donor types (governments, multilateral institutions, private foundations, and the public-private sector) were stakeholder engagement, rights and tenure, policy, law analysis and development, institutional strengthening, and the implementation of improved forest and land management. Stakeholder engagement Rights and Tenure MRV and reference levels Safeguards Policy & law analysis; REDD strategy Institutional strengthening Forest carbon project design Forest and land management Carbon Offsets and perf.-based payments Other √ √ √ Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions √ √ √ √ X X X X X √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Supranational Institutions √ √ √√ REDD+ Activities 17
  19. 19. GHANA Levels of REDD+ Funding Flowing Total cumulative commitments increased from US$1.8m in 2009 to US$14.2m in 2010, reaching US$14.3m in 2011. The sharp in- crease in commitments between 2009 and 2010 was accompanied by a similar relative increase in disbursements but, in general, donors have been slower at releasing committed funds. In 2009, US$699,256 (or 38.2% of the total committed funds) had been transferred to recipient institutions. Disbursements increased in 2010 and 2011 to reach US$7.6m (or 53% of the total committed funds) by the end of 2011. $ 699,256 2009 2010 2011 $ 1,828,257 $ 14,223,277 $ 14,325,886 $ 6,461,120 $ 7,604,958 38.2% 45.4% 53% Funds committed Proportion of funds committed already disbursed *The figure represents all known donor commitments for REDD+ activities in Ghana between 2009 and 2011. This includes one commitment for US$7,745 from the Global Forest Coalition to Friends of the Earth. At publication, we could not corroborate the source of the Global Forest Coalition’s (a coalition of NGOs) funding. For this reason, the Global Forest Coalition “commitment” has been included in the total funds committed but has not been tracked in the country charts. Cumulative commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 18 Our In-Country Partner
  20. 20. GHANA Emerging Results - Flows of Finance Donors Recipients $ 4,508,716 $ 601,372 $ 9,215,798 $12,408,716 Government of Ghana Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations Ghanaian Institutions International Institutions$ 1,373,307 $ 543,863 Mapping the flows of REDD+ financing to Ghana highlights that donor government agencies are funding the government of Ghana and international institutions, with the majority of funding directed through bilateral government-to-government agreements. Multilateral institutions are only funding the government of Ghana. Private foundations have committed 90% of their funds to Ghanaian institutions – including Ghanaian NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups – and around 10% of their funding to international institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions. Flows of REDD+ finance between donors and recipients, 2009-2011 19
  21. 21. GHANA Donors Darker shades represent portion already disbursed Government Agency Multilateral Institution Private Foundation Funds committed Funds disbursed NORAD (Norway) $ 555,000 $ 385,000 USAID (USA) $ 175,000 $ 175,000 BMU (Germany) $ 111,304 $ 33,055 ITTO $ 658,716 $ 658,716 ADB $ 250,000 $ 0 World Bank $ 3,600,000 $ 200,000 JICA (Japan) $ 7,800,000 $ 5,100,000 DANIDA (Denmark) $ 574,494 $ 451,815 Moore F. $ 206,372 $ 206,372 Rockefeller F. $ 395,000 $ 395,000 The chart shows the relative levels of funding donors have committed as well as the proportion disbursed through 2011. The percentage of committed funding that has been disbursed varies from 100% to 0%. However, the majority of listed donors tend to have a disbursement percentage greater than 65%. Proportional total donor commitments and disbursements, 2009-2011 Darker shades represent portion already disbursed 20 Norway
  22. 22. GHANA Recipients Funds committed to Ghana (2009-2011) $12,408,716 Government of Ghana Ghanaian Institutions International Institutions 86.6% $ 543,863 3.8% 9.6% $ 1,373,307 To date, the REDD X initiative has tracked REDD+ finance as it flows from donors to the first institution receiving the funding. This so-called “first recipient” will have a legal or formal agreement with the donor specifying the total amount of funding, a timeline for activities and a schedule for when finance will be spent. The first recipients receiving funding for REDD+ activities in Ghana are predominantly based in Ghana. 86.6% of funds committed in the period from 2009 to 2011 have been directed towards funding REDD+ activities through the government of Ghana, with the Forest Commission, the Forestry Research Institute of Ghana and the Ministry of Lands & Natural Resources all scheduled to receive funds. Ghanaian institutions – including NGOs, academic institutions, consultants and community groups – are scheduled to receive an additional 3.8% of the funding from donors. International Institutions – including international NGOs with headquarters outside the country and international academic institutions – are scheduled to receive 9.6% of the total funds committed for REDD+ funding in Ghana. Commitments to first recipients by location and type 21
  23. 23. GHANA REDD+ Activities The chart shows the REDD+ activities supported by the different donor institution types. The list of activities and definitions was drawn from broad agreement among REDD+ experts, including the civil society national partners collecting data across the initiative countries. It is important to note that the absence of support for an activity from a specific donor type does not constitute a lack of attention to the activity overall, since the activity could be well-funded through other donor types. In Ghana, the activities that received support from all donor types (governments, multilateral institutions, and private foundations) were stakeholder engagement, monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) and reference levels. Stakeholder engagement Rights and Tenure MRV and reference levels Safeguards Policy & law analysis; REDD strategy Institutional strengthening Forest carbon project design Forest and land management Carbon Offsets and perf.-based payments Other Donor Governments Multilateral Institutions Private Foundations √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X REDD+ Activities 22
  24. 24. EMERGING GLOBAL PICTURE SOURCE: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2012. Ecosystem Marketplace; REDDX Project, Forest Trade and Finance Initiative TOP 10 THREATENED FOREST HOT-SPOTS MILLIONS OF $ SUPPORTING FOREST CONSERVATION VIA PRIVATE OFFSETTING $1-15 MILLION $15-35 MILLION $35-50 MILLION $50-100 MILLION $100-200 MILLION MILLIONS OF $ OF REDD FINANCING COMMITTED MILLIONS OF $ OF REDD FINANCING DISBURSED 23
  25. 25. REDDX Looking Forward Next Step for REDDX: REDDX is now shifting focus to tracking finance from donors and initial recipients all the way down to the community level in our REDDX countries. Looking at how communities are engaging with REDD+ and the level of funding actually reaching local organiza- tions or community groups is a key component of this study. Data collection for 2012 is already starting to capture how funding is being spent at the local community level. REDDX is also working with Governments to track their own finance for REDD+. This is important in building a comprehensive pic- ture of all the international and national finance and activities taking place. Such information will also provide a powerful message for national governments in coordinating with donors around under-funded activities. REDDX currently tracks REDD+ finance in thirteen countries and is now looking to extend the project and track REDD+ finance in additional countries to build a more comprehensive, global picture of finance gaps and needs. Public financing for REDD+ is criti- cal, but information remains patchy on levels of finance going to some of the world’s top forest hotspots and countries with high rates of deforestation. To more effectively determine the full financing picture, it is vital that REDDX increase in scope to track high level public and private funds, revealing the global state of REDD+ financing. The governments of Kenya and Ethiopia have already requested fast admission to the REDDX initiative to better understand what REDD+ activities are happening in-country. In addition, countries are already asking to use the REDDX methodology to develop national REDD+ Registries (a catalogue of all REDD+ projects in-country and the main way that governments will make decisions about where their funding will go) and tools for wider climate finance tracking. REDDX will look to build capacity and support long term monitoring of REDD+ at the national and regional level. 24
  26. 26. Project Supported by:

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