GPFLR Towards a global learning network of sites by Cora van Oosten

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Presentation by Cora van Oosten on the Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration. The focus is on the learning strategy, learning sites and network development.

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GPFLR Towards a global learning network of sites by Cora van Oosten

  1. 1. Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration Towards a global learning network of sites (Bali, May 2009)
  2. 2. Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration Started around 2005 n International organisations: IUCN, WWF, PROFOR, UNFF, UNEP-WCMC, IUFRO, ITTO, ICRAF, CIFOR, FAO, CBD, CARE, ARC n UK Forestry Commission, US Forest Service n Growing number of governments n Growing number of individuals
  3. 3. Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration Aim: n Effectively restore the world’s degraded forest landscapes n Establish and improve relationships among resource managers, policy makers, environmentalists, researchers and other groups involved in forest landscape restoration n Encourage the development and use of innovative FLR approaches and methodologies
  4. 4. Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration Major achievements: n International advocacy n Putting forest landscape restoration in the picture n Mobilise global interest and financial means
  5. 5. Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration Yet to be done: n Link more with site level n Putting “theory” into “practice” n Getting local actors involved n Launch process of collective learning n Translate lessons learned to policy level
  6. 6. GPFLR Learning Network GPFLR
  7. 7. GPFLR Learning Network Gradually building the learning network: n January-March 2009: Scoping phase n April-September 2009: Development phase n September 2009 onward: Operational phase
  8. 8. Scoping report (March 2009)
  9. 9. Scoping phase n Needs and expectations of GPFLR partners n Needs and expectations of learning sites n Identification of learning objectives n Identification of learning strategy n Identification of opportunities and risks
  10. 10. Scoping phase: overall opinion Positive: n Linking practitioners, policy makers and academia n Up-scaling of site experience n International exposure of site managers n Fosters creativity and critical thinking n Dialogue - action oriented - institutional change
  11. 11. Scoping phase: objectives n “Reforest the world” n Feed policy makers with evidence-based advice n Further develop FLR concept through shared learning and practice n Enhance local FLR efforts
  12. 12. Scoping phase: a “cloud” of objectives Learning actor actor site Site-based actor actor learning Learning Inter-site learning Innovative site Learning policy site advice Forest Landscape Restoration
  13. 13. Scoping phase: Knowledge for action n Pure action networks: lobby & advocacy n Pure knowledge networks: exchange knowledge without using that knowledge to take action (academic networks) n Knowledge for action: exchange of knowledge to help practitioners do their work more effectively (Source: Brown & Salafsky, 2004, quoted by Conje, 2005)
  14. 14. Scoping phase: good practices network n Information Exchange Network: provision of information, one-way traffic, info from providers to users n Research network: formal learning framework, pre- defined research questions, data collection n “Good Practices” Network: (in) formal learning framework, continuous change, learning by doing, two- way traffic (Source: Brown & Salafsky, 2004, quoted by Conje, 2005)
  15. 15. Good practice network n No practice is best, many practices are good n Good practice = Innovative n Good practice = Effective n Sustainable n Good practice = Replicable (?) Only if shared and contextualised
  16. 16. Good practice network We also learn from: n Bad practice n Problems encountered n Failures n Difficulties Only if openly presented and shared
  17. 17. Scoping phase: users, producers and connectors partner partner partn er GPFLR GPFLR coordinator Learning site 1 Learning site 2 actor actor Networ acto acto k r r facilitato actor r Polic y Learning site 3 Universities make acto Policy r r make produce r ITTO r media CIFOR compan user y public IUFRO company connecto media r
  18. 18. Scoping phase: nested networks Learning process at site level (intra-site) Learning process at global level (inter-site)
  19. 19. Scoping phase: nested networks § Strengthening local FLR initiatives § Enhancing local multi-stakeholder dialogue § Enhancing local networks § Connecting networks (“nested” networks)
  20. 20. Scoping phase: facilitation Facilitation of the learning process: n Both at central, and at decentralised level n Responsibility of network members n Local ownership
  21. 21. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  22. 22. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  23. 23. Learning strategy: Reflective learning After: Kolb’s learning cycle
  24. 24. Learning strategy: Reflective learning Monitor Monitor Evaluate Act Evaluate Act Plan Plan After: Kolb’s learning cycle
  25. 25. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  26. 26. Learning strategy: issue focused 1. Site level restoration techniques 2. Analysing landscape dynamics (biophysical, socio-economic, institutional) 3. Analysing stakeholders (needs, claims, motivations at various scales) 4. Mechanisms of stakeholder involvement (multi-stakeholder dialogue) 5. Competing and conflicting claims (drivers and influencing factors) 6. Negotiation and conflict resolution 7. Wider policy environment 8. Governance and multi-scale governance (transboundary issues) 9. Defining broader landscape objectives 10. Defining specific restoration objectives 11. Monitoring & evaluation 12. Financing FLR
  27. 27. Learning strategy: issue focused Where to start? Priority setting per learning site
  28. 28. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  29. 29. Learning strategy: blended learning n Real life encounters “Blended” learning n Web-based tools
  30. 30. Learning strategy: blended learning Topical Site workshops Training meetings events Economic Assessment of rationale of FLR global restoration potential Research Resources & documents Web-based learning platform
  31. 31. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  32. 32. Learning strategy: horizontal and vertical linkages Horizontal learning: n Learning at sites n Learning between site
  33. 33. Learning strategy: horizontal and vertical linkages Vertical learning: Inter-action between practitioners, policy makers, and researchers
  34. 34. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  35. 35. Learning strategy: output oriented action learning n Learning activities translated into tangible action (document, video, policy brief, article, guidelines) n Action research: strategic alliance with CIFOR (Landscape tools initiative) n Social software (social bookmarking, audiovisuals, blogs): building social relations
  36. 36. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  37. 37. Learning strategy: Capacity development Active participation requires special skills: n “Technical” knowledge on FLR n Process facilitation n Web-based communication
  38. 38. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  39. 39. Learning strategy: North-South exchange North-South exchange: Participation of Northern/Southern, Eastern/Western, Temperate/tropical sites
  40. 40. Scoping phase: learning strategy n Reflective learning n Issue-driven and output oriented n Blended learning n Horizontal and vertical linkages n Output orientation and action learning n Capacity development n North-south and South-south exchange n Monitoring: learning-by-doing
  41. 41. Learning strategy: Monitoring & evaluation Monitoring of learning networks: n Multiple objectives and multiple activities n No linear process n Outcome unpredictable n Learning-by-doing n Site-specific and cross-country action research n Evaluation end of the first year
  42. 42. Learning sites Selection of learning sites: n Limited number of enthusiastic “pilot” sites n Sites proposed by GPFLR partners n Livelihoods & landscapes sites n Auto-selection of sites
  43. 43. Learning sites Criteria for learning sites: n (willing to get) involved in FLR activities n Willing to comply with FLR principles (dual filter, multi-stakeholder involvement) n Willing to share information and learn n Availability of capable and enthusiastic personnel
  44. 44. GPFLR learning sites United Kingdom: Netherlands: Kielder and Veluwe Trossachs China: Miyun United States: South Platte Thailand Dong Mae Salong Indonesia ???? Brazil: Ghana: Pame Great Uganda: Sudan Acre Berekum Lakes Mount Elgon
  45. 45. Scoping phase: pre-conditions for success n Long term commitment of GPFLR core group ($$) n Envisaged results and impact have to be clearly and collectively defined beforehand n Active participation and contribution of learning sites (local ownership) n In-built disposition at site level to disclose information, release staff time, allocate resources
  46. 46. Four initial meetings Kick-off meetings to get to know each other, define learning sites and contacts, define learning priorities n May: Indonesia n June: Rwanda (Great Lakes) n June/July: Brazil n September: England
  47. 47. Indonesia workshop n To get to know each other n To share our experiences with FLR n To define the shape of this network n To define our learning priorities n To define the way in which we want to learn n To define learning sites n To define roles and responsibilities of actors involved
  48. 48. Web-based support n Generic GPFLR website: http://www.ideastransformlandscapes.org n FLR Learning platform: http://learning.gpflr.webfactional.com
  49. 49. GPFLR website and learning platform
  50. 50. GPFLR website and learning platform
  51. 51. GPFLR website and learning platform
  52. 52. Web-based learning platform

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