Ez card holder stand

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This set of slides shows the conceptual idea growing of a EZ card holder stand design.

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Ez card holder stand

  1. 2. Act 1 Spent a couple of minutes, conceptualise a holder to contain or hold 3-4 of your designed EZ-link holders.
  2. 3. <ul><li>Focus/Teaching Point: </li></ul><ul><li>3-D design, link to project 1. </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing/doodling – lots of it (sketchpad). </li></ul><ul><li>Design Journal – lots of sketching and doodling with the help of templates (2D & 3D); templates vis-à-vis sizing & working drawing & marking out in the workshop. </li></ul><ul><li>Research – shape borrowing from animals (how to shape borrow? There is a process of ‘try, try, & try’ to get the ‘best and cute fit’ in terms of shape borrowing e.g. Disney character.) </li></ul><ul><li>Research – World Wildlife Fund, understanding sustainability, the purpose behind sustainability, the purpose of WWF, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Modeling material – cardboard or foam board or blue foam or recycled material. </li></ul><ul><li>Material – jelutong, brass plate or school’s choice. </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop process – shaping of different material (sawing of curves, straight lines, kerf, etc.), joints (e.g. screw), or can introduce simple bending on brass plate to connect with main body. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce finishing to wood or metal. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Similar to project 1: Act 1 – design without guides. Act 2 – design with guides: first 2-D, then 3-D Act 2
  4. 9. <ul><li>Do lots of these 2D designs. Purpose is to practise drawing straight lines, curves, irregular curves, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Need to set constraints. E.g. two straight lines and two curve lines forming an enclosure or two straight lines and two free-form lines forming an enclosure, etc. </li></ul>
  5. 10. Act 2 You try. Spent a couple of minutes, work out a number of random shapes.
  6. 11. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  7. 12. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  8. 13. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  9. 14. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  10. 15. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  11. 16. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  12. 17. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  13. 18. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  14. 19. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  15. 20. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  16. 21. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  17. 22. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  18. 23. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  19. 24. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  20. 25. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  21. 26. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  22. 27. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  23. 28. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  24. 29. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  25. 30. <ul><li>Similarly 3-D forms – Practise practise, practise. </li></ul><ul><li>Give pupils templates of different rectangular forms. </li></ul>
  26. 31. In these 10 pages of design work, there are bits and pieces, trial & error, erasing, overlapping, etc. that are not shown here and should not be taken as unimportant work. It is together with these bits and pieces of work that the design progresses. Where possible, try to show as much as you possibly can in a natural way of doing your design. No need to show the process for the sake of showing. But let the process show in a natural progression of the design.
  27. 33. E.g. to arrive at this stage of the face, different trial & error stages like this page is executed. This is just an example of the many ‘in-betweens’ that are not being shown here or articulated in the design sheets. It has been tried and erased as the design progresses. In these 8 pages of design work, there are bits and pieces, trial & error, erasing, overlapping, etc. that are not shown here and should not be taken as unimportant work. It is together with these bits and pieces of work that the design progresses. Where possible, try to show as much as you possibly can in a natural way of doing your design. No need to show the process for the sake of showing. But let the process show in a natural progression of the design.
  28. 35. Act 3 You try. Spent a couple of minutes, work out a number of random forms. Design the final object.
  29. 36. What are we doing here? Teacher to demo and show. Pupils to doodle, sketch, doodle, and understand the need to ‘doodle and sketch quantitatively’ to arrive at a suitable design outcome. Do it in class. Do it at home. Keep a journal for all these sketches to be worked on. It is in a big way, practising drawing. Drawing in 3D. Correction will then be facilitated as pupils penned down their drawings.
  30. 37. What are we doing here? Also, Shape-Borrowing . This is a pretty subtle interpretation of existing real shape. Converting it to a nice cute looking cartoon-like or ‘animated’ like images would need trial-&-error stages. If faced with difficulty, make reference to cartoon characters. How designers work on such cartoon characters in the form of shape borrowing.
  31. 38. What are we doing here? Given or discuss design situation, design brief, design specifications with pupils; Pupils to research into WWF; emphasis on sustainability design; research into different animals; animal shapes and forms; doodling and sketching from 2D to 3D, till final designS; work on simple working drawing for marking out; work on modeling the outcome; marking out on materials; different shaping processes; different cutting processes; different finishing processes; and evaluation, if possible.
  32. 39. What are we doing here? What have they learnt or covered? A checklist could be used to work on topics to be covered or not covered, and how these topics could be worked into the project. E.g. technology like electronics may be considered.
  33. 40. <ul><li>Need to decide on design situation, design brief, design specifications and </li></ul><ul><li>Size of project </li></ul><ul><li>Size of materials </li></ul><ul><li>2-D template </li></ul><ul><li>3-D template …so that pupils after doodling and drawing can mark out on materials by tracing on it. </li></ul><ul><li>Make samples to show </li></ul>
  34. 44. <ul><li>Integrative approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Given context, design brief, design specifications, pupils to research and ideate. </li></ul><ul><li>2D to 3D ideation, doodling, sketching, drawing (lots of it!). </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Sustainable’ awareness – environmental awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Could incorporate ‘technology’. </li></ul><ul><li>A task suitable for lower secondary and upper secondary levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints build into activity and at the same time room given for creativity and sketching activity. For example, ‘shape borrowing’ technique introduced. Shape borrowing for iconic animal shape. </li></ul><ul><li>Range of materials could be considered. </li></ul>Summary – Session 2
  35. 45. <ul><li>Integrative approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Build in constraints. There is control and yet allow for creativity – random line trigger. </li></ul><ul><li>Pupils are given design situation, design brief, design specifications – pupils to start research and ideation straight away. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on doodling, sketching, drawing 2-D objects (lots of it!). </li></ul><ul><li>The cycle time between ideation, confirming chosen idea, and making should be short. </li></ul><ul><li>Task suitable for lower secondary and primary levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Chosen design task to suit pupils’ taste as far as possible. This particular task of designing a memorabilia does not appeal to some pupils. Some felt that it is a waste of time (however they felt that D&T is enjoyable! Contradictory but interesting remarks.) We can’t meet the taste of all pupils. That is for sure. But we need to focus on the learning and developmental outcomes. </li></ul>Summary – Session 1
  36. 46. <ul><li>To explain the given Design Situation, Design Brief, Design Specifications for lower secondary pupils is important. Pupils learn the meaning of such components in a design process. And they are not required to write them for a start. </li></ul><ul><li>Pupils get to design immediately. Pupils get to research into information directly related to their design. </li></ul><ul><li>Whilst pupils design, they practise sketching and drawing. Lots of them. </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints (e.g. overall size, lines and circles) allow pupils to do marking out directly on material. This form of marking out using template could be taught. </li></ul>Summary – Session 1
  37. 47. Summary – Session 1 <ul><li>Cutting straight lines & curves, drilling holes, and finishing could be taught and controlled. Joining of two similar of different materials could be taught. </li></ul><ul><li>Simple technology could be incorporated (e.g. the use of LED light and button battery.) </li></ul><ul><li>More importantly, </li></ul><ul><li>Time is spent on activities that are age appropriate and with a focus on visual literacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Outcome is something creative, doable, and yet allows lots of fun. </li></ul><ul><li>Integrative approach allows direct link between content and application. </li></ul><ul><li>No downtime. </li></ul>Summary – Session 1
  38. 48. Food for thought! <ul><li>Plan a programme for your pupils to work on a project using the approach shared. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a design scenario (an interesting scenario suitable for the pupils.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a design brief, a set of design specifications. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide on design technique/s to be taught. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide on types of material and size of material to be given to the pupils. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide on types of processes and technology (simple technology) to be taught and incorporated into the project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers to go through the programme, and design & make the project/artefact themselves before implementing. </li></ul></ul>Food for thought
  39. 49. Philosophy of Design & Technology education <ul><li>solving real-world, ill-defined problems. </li></ul><ul><li>cognitive development in the concrete/iconic modes of cognition. </li></ul><ul><li>development of a wide range of abilities in nonverbal thought and communication. </li></ul><ul><li>Cross, N., 2007 </li></ul>

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