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Universal Design / Integrated Aligned Design

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13 May 2011 workshop co-designed by Kate Martin & Ilene Alexander, Center for Teaching and Learning, and Susan Aase & Tim Kamenar

13 May 2011 workshop co-designed by Kate Martin & Ilene Alexander, Center for Teaching and Learning, and Susan Aase & Tim Kamenar

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  • KATE - Warm up Activity.Provide the “9 Principles” Handout as they arrive. Given what you’ve just read, discuss in pairs one that you think you already do well, and/or one that you can’t imagine doing or would have difficulty doing.
  • KATE IntroductionFocus: the application of Integrated AlignedDesign principles to the participants’ work.  Universal Design is more than disability access; it enhances “good” design which improves overall teaching and learning.Welcome – introduce facilitators (selves & offices) – model in our intros that we’re not just focusing on ‘disability perspective lens’ – social modelReview agenda/learning objective and outcomesGround rules for session
  • KATE IntroductionReview agenda/learning objective and outcomesEstablish a baseline understanding of Universal Design.Link the principles of Universal Design to practices in design and delivery of instruction.Apply Universal Design to each participant’s work.
  • KATE IntroductionGround rules for session
  • SUSAN 9 Principles - Mini history - Review of the principles. - Transition to good design segmentInclude a debrief of the “Motivator” activity - ask them which ones they feel most comfortable with and which seem more challenging.
  • Participants will leave with strategies for incorporating principles of Universal Design into their work.Participants will be able to create a timeline for applying Universal Design to their work.Participants will be able to develop a plan for assessing their work that incorporates Universal Design principles.
  • Slide Description: This slide sets out the first three components of “Constructive Alignment,” a concept John Biggs and Catherine Tang propose to describe the confluence of learners engaged in construction of meaning and teachers engaged in alignment of instructional elements to support meaning making. The slide is headlined “Constructive Alignment.” Underneath, three circles set out the main components of constructive alignment: 1. teaching and learning activities; 2. intended learning outcomes; 3. Assessment Tasks. Arrows between the circles indicate that interactions between the elements flows in at least two directions.
  • This second slide focuses on Constructive Alignment, a design scheme that brings the three elements work together and adds a fourth component: consideration of Environmental Factors. Via animation, the three aligned circles move into a pyramid with Intended learning outcomes moving to the pinnacle, assessment tasks then moving into position in the bottom right corner, followed by teaching and learning activities positioned in the bottom left corner. Lines appear in the animation to line the three elements, suggesting that a design process moves from development of outcomes to consideration of assessment tasks and on to devising of supporting teaching and learning activities. Finally, red crosses (represented by the letter X) appear over the connecting lines to suggest that constructive alignment breaks down when the connections between elements are inappropriate, inadequate or overlooked.
  • This slide links our workshop handout on “Universal Course Design” to the constructive alignment of Biggs and Tang (which is echoed in the significant learning design concept set out by L. Dee Fink) so that Course Curriculum maps onto Intended Learning Outcomes, Assessment takes the spot of Assessment Tasks, Instruction holds the role of Teaching and Learning Activities, and Environment links to Environmental Factors.
  • ILENEApplying the model/design to contextsConcrete example of how it applies with non-traditional students (Ilene)Concrete example of how it applies with international students (Kate)Concrete example of how it applies to students with disabilities (Tim)
  • KATEMain challenges (August 2010 survey): - Learning in a second language - Lack of shared academic culture - Feeling isolated or excludedApplying the model/design to contextsConcrete example of how it applies with non-traditional students (Ilene)Concrete example of how it applies with international students (Kate)Concrete example of how it applies to students with disabilities (Tim)
  • TIMReflection of design features for Int’l students – how same elements promote equal access for those with disabilitiesApplying the model/design to contextsConcrete example of how it applies with non-traditional students (Ilene)Concrete example of how it applies with international students (Kate)Concrete example of how it applies to students with disabilities (Tim)
  • TIMREPRISE of initial walking-in activityWhat are you walking away with now that is new or deeper understanding? Think about what you identified in the very first look at the 9 Principles and how it is folded into design. ILENESet up next learning activity prior to breakGives handout for the activity
  • 10 Minutes
  • ILENE- Instructions + Info about their class + Work in their pairs Ilene re-do slideHave pairs analyze the Intro to Library Research for strengths and opportunities in terms of UDI Divvy up the 4 topics on the UCD and assign one to each pair. If they finish their assigned one, they go on to another topic. Tim / Ilene - Debrief/discussion/reporting/questions – infuse the technology points into the debrief (concretely point out how our Ppt meets UDI principles)
  • KATE- Instructions + Info about their class + Work in their pairs Ilene re-do slideHave pairs analyze the Intro to Library Research for strengths and opportunities in terms of UDI Divvy up the 4 topics on the UCD and assign one to each pair. If they finish their assigned one, they go on to another topic. Tim / Ilene - Debrief/discussion/reporting/questions – infuse the technology points into the debrief (concretely point out how our Ppt meets UDI principles)
  • KATE- Instructions + Info about their class + Work in their pairs Ilene re-do slideHave pairs analyze the Intro to Library Research for strengths and opportunities in terms of UDI Divvy up the 4 topics on the UCD and assign one to each pair. If they finish their assigned one, they go on to another topic. Tim / Ilene - Debrief/discussion/reporting/questions – infuse the technology points into the debrief (concretely point out how our Ppt meets UDI principles)
  • TIM / ILENEDebrief/discussion/reporting/questionsinfuse the technology points into the debrief (concretely point out how our Ppt meets UDI principles)Ensure integrate Basics:Design: Courses are designed for the maximum diversity of learners, with disability-related accommodations provided as part of equitable participation of all learners.Information: Information is presented in clear and accessible ways, through multiple formats.Physical access: Classrooms and instruction are physically accessible and safe for diverse users.Pedagogy: Instruction aims for clarity and support for a variety of learners, creating a welcoming community where students are engaged and able to demonstrate what they know through flexible assessments.
  • TIMTransition to project workUse handouts as guide/tools for reviewing their personal projects. Include a rubric for assessing their work, guidelines for establishing planning factors, and recommendations for building a timeline for completing their work 11-11:30 Project WorkParticipants perform work individually or in small groups. Flag what they’re working on so they can pair up and work together. (Back of UCD model handout has a template for them to fill in as they work – guidelines and examples.)11:30-45-Summarize projectsShare and debrief
  • ILENE and TIM11:30-45-Summarize projectsShare and debriefEnsure integrate Basics:Design: Courses are designed for the maximum diversity of learners, with disability-related accommodations provided as part of equitable participation of all learners.Information: Information is presented in clear and accessible ways, through multiple formats.Physical access: Classrooms and instruction are physically accessible and safe for diverse users.Pedagogy: Instruction aims for clarity and support for a variety of learners, creating a welcoming community where students are engaged and able to demonstrate what they know through flexible assessments.
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  • KATEAction planningWhat skills do I need to develop to be able to do this work?When do you need to have this done? What are my on-going assessments? Who are your collaborators?Delivery modes and what it takes?What are your constraints in terms of time, resources, etc.?
  • SUSAN
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome!
      As you arrive, please review the chart, “The Nine Principles of UDI©.”
      Given the Principles, work on your own to identify and makes notes about:
      One principle you already enact well.
      One principle that you would have difficulty enacting for whatever reason.
    • 2. Incorporating Universal Design Principles in the Development, Delivery, and Assessment of Your Instruction
      Susan A. Aase, J.D., M.S.Ed., Outreach Coordinator, Disability Services
      Ilene D. Alexander, PhD, Teaching Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning
      Tim Kamenar, M.S., Disability Specialist, Disability Services
      Kate Martin, M.A., Teaching Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning
    • 3. Agenda
      Presentation: The Nine Principles & Integrated Aligned Design – Universal Course Design model
      Application: “Introduction to Library Research”Analysis
      Project work: Prioritizing, Assessing, Planning
    • 4. Ground Rules
      Confidentiality – examples, questions, experience
      Question asking throughout – with “bracketing”
      Climate of frankness – spirit of risk-taking withclimate of peer collaboration, respect, feedback
      Participation – constituted as talking, listening, questioning, responding, synthesizing, noting omissions, linking, extending – and balanced: step up to speak, step back to listen.
    • 5. Universal Design
      DEFINITION OF UNIVERSAL DESIGN
      “the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without need for adaptation or specialized design.”
      (Ronald Mace, Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University)
    • 6. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      Equitable use
      Instruction is designed to be useful to and accessible by people with diverse abilities. Provide the same means of use for all students; identical whenever possible, equivalent when not.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 7. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      2. Flexibility in use
      Instruction is designed to accommodate a wide range of individual abilities. Provide choice in methods of use.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 8. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      3. Simple and intuitive
      Instruction is designed in a straightforward and predictable manner, regardless of the student's experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level. Eliminate unnecessary complexity.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 9. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      4. Perceptible information
      Instruction is designed so that necessary information is communicated effectively to the student, regardless of ambient conditions or the student's sensory abilities.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 10. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      5. Tolerance for error
      Instruction anticipates variation in individual student learning pace and prerequisite skills.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 11. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      6. Low physical effort
      Instruction is designed to minimize nonessential physical effort in order to allow maximum attention to learning.
      Note: This principle does not apply when physical effort is integral to essential requirements of a course.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 12. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      7. Size and space for approach and use
      Instruction is designed with consideration for appropriate size and space for approach, reach, manipulations, and use regardless of a student's body size, posture, mobility, and communication needs.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 13. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      8. A community of learners
      The instructional environment promotes interaction and communication among students and between students and faculty.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 14. THE NINE PRINICIPLES OF UDI©
      9. Instructional climate
      Instruction is designed to be welcoming and inclusive. High expectations are espoused for all students.
      UDI Online Project. (2009). Examples of UDI in Online and Blended Courses. Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
    • 15. Self-assessment - One-minute paper
      Refer to your notes about one principle you enact well and one that you would have difficulty enacting.
      What, if anything, has changed?
    • 16. Intended Learning Outcomes
      Teaching & Learning Activities
      Feedback & Assessment Tasks
      Adapted from John Biggs & Catherine Tang, and from Dee Fink
      Integrated Aligned Design
    • 17. Intended Learning Outcomes
      Learning & Teaching Activities
      Feedback & Assessment Tasks
      Environmental Factors
    • 18. Curriculum
      Intended Learning Outcomes
      Instruction
      Teaching & Learning Activities
      Assessment
      Assessment Tasks
      Environment
    • 19. How “Non-Traditional” Students benefit from UCD
      Provides multiple ways to participate
      Uses multiple assessment modes/measures
      Offers culturally relevant examples
      Moves from “medical” to “social” models, provoking similar movements toward contextual, complex, divergent thinking and away from group think
      Provides scaffolding, feedback, natural supports, which demystifies & skills
    • 20. How International Studentsbenefit from UCD
      Provides multiple modes of taking in information
      Makes culture-bound concepts explicit
      Promotes time to think/plan before participation is expected
      Allows for multiple ways demonstrating learning + accepts “written accent”
      Fosters inclusive pairings/groupings and environment
    • 21. How Students with Disabilitiesbenefit from UCD
      Identify the “essential requirements” to aid in curricular design
      Include text descriptions of printed visuals and Captioning/audio description of video
      Provide electronic formats for multiple ways to access printed and displayed materials
      Incorporate flexibility in modes of assessment
      Modify on-line instruction - accessible/useful
    • 22. Sample & Summary
      Look at Sample assignment to summarize the application of good design (UCD and the nine principles)
      Instructions for after the break
    • 23. Break!
    • 24. Applying UCD to Library Context
    • 25. Applying UCD to Library Context
      Cluster yourselves into trios.
      Each trio will be assigned a segment of the “Intro to Library Research, Part 1” handout.
      Your trio is part of a team redeveloping your part of the handout for use in Writing Studio 1201 classes like the one just described.
      Drawing on today’s ideas and “What is Universal Course Design?” discuss how you…
    • 26. Applying UCD to Library Context
      … would make this handout more accessible:
      • How would you re-make the assignment in terms of objectives, active learning, students’ own interests, assessment of learning?
      • 27. How would you re-make the assignment in terms of its delivery as a document, object, learning tool?
      • 28. What would you need to change about the class session overall to incorporate the changes you will suggest implementing?
    • Applying UCD to Library Context
      Debrief/discussion
    • 29. Project Work
      Getting Started
      Take your first priority. Set up a plan for making it happen and assessing its effectiveness.
      Start the work. Map out or begin to draft the new elements of your instruction or assessment.
    • 30. Project Work – Discussion
    • 31. A man is shoveling snow off some steps, there is a wheelchair ramp next to the steps. A group of students waits at the bottom of the steps, one is using a wheelchair. The student with the chair says “when will you shovel the ramp so I can get in?” The man says “I will shovel the ramp after I shovel the stairs.” The wheelchair user says “if you shovel the ramp first, we can all get in.”
      What UD Isn’t
      Just for students with disabilities…
      When will you shovel the ramp so I can get in?
      I will shovel the ramp after I shovel the stairs.
      If you shovel the ramp first, we can all get in.
    • 32. A man sits at a desk, seven animals are standing in front of him (crow, monkey, penguin, elephant, fish, seal, goat), a tree is behind the animals. The man states "For a fair selection, everybody has to take the same exam: please climb that tree."
      What UD Isn’t
      A one-size-fits-all approach…
    • 33. What UD Isn’t
      Simple and Intuitive…
      An image which contain a complex set of irregular shapes, arrows, and numbers; all are crossing over the others in a jumbled fashion.
    • 34. What UD Isn’t
      A dumbing down of teaching and learning…
      Children are in a computer lab working at the computers. A girl has a confused look on her face and the teacher is telling her “just go to www.criticalthinking.com and click on ‘answers’.”
    • 35. What UD Isn’t
      Simply adding technology…
      A man is hanging by his fingertips on the edge of a cliff. Another man stands on the ledge above the man, looking down, and says, “don’t worry, technology will save you.”
    • 36. What UD Isn’t
      The solution to all teachingand learning…
      An instructor is standing in the front of the classroom pointing to a diagram of the human digestive system. He states, “We don’t know what this is called.”
    • 37. What UD Isn’t
      Only the instructor’sresponsibility…
      A young male student is standing at the chalkboard speaking to a teacher, the math problem 3 + 6 = is on the board. He says to her, “can I solve this tomorrow? The muse just isn’t with me today.”
    • 38. Action Planning – What UCD Includes
      Mapping out
      Learning and Development Outcomes
      Essential components
      Cycle of Integrated Aligned Design
      Engaging in
      Peer consultation and formative feedback
      Collaboration across skill sets / interests
      Planning for
      Timely (re)development and delivery
      Ambiguity of context, flexibility in use
    • 39.
    • 40. Evaluation
    • 41. Thank you!