Cranfield Presentation On Women in Leadership

2,823 views
2,272 views

Published on

Ruth Sealy presentation at Icon Events Gender Talent Pipeline masterclass, Women in Leadership.

Published in: Business, Career
1 Comment
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • One part of the Female FTSE story, back in 2012. For bang up to date info see: http://www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/p1087/Research/Research-Centres/Cranfield-International-Centre-for-Women-Leaders
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,823
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
28
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
1
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cranfield Presentation On Women in Leadership

  1. Women in L eadership – UK and beyond… D r Ruth SealyInternational C entre for Women L eaders C ranfield School of M anagement London June 21st 2012
  2. Female FTSE Index 2009 ­ 2012 Female FTSE 100  Oct  Oct  Oct  Jan  May  2008  2009  2010  2012  2012 Female held  131  131  135  163   176  directorships  (11.8%)  (12.2%)  (12.5%)  (15.0%)  (16.0%) Female  17  17    18      20         20  executive  (4.8%)  (5.2%)  (5.5%)  (6.6%)  (6.6%) directorships Female NEDs  114  114  117  143     156  (14.9%)  (15.2%)  (15.6%)  (18.3%)  (19.6%) Women holding  113  113  116  141  153 directorships  www.bit.ly/FemaleFTSEReport2012 
  3. Women on Boards 2012  No. of All  Date  No of  Male  Boards  Boards  with  Women  October  25  2008  75  October  25  2009  75  October  21  2010  79  January  11  2012  89  May     9   2012  91  www.bit.ly/FemaleFTSEReport2012 
  4. Increasing Percentage of  Directorships going to Women Female FTSE  12 mth to   Sept 2011         12 mth to   12 mth to   12 mth to  100  Oct 2010  (6 mth)  Jan 2012  Mar 2012  May 2012 New female appointments  18  21  47  45  44 New male appointments  117  72  143  123  108 Total new appointments  135  93  190  168  156 Female % of new appointments  13.3%  22.50%  24.7%  26.7%  28.2%  www.bit.ly/FemaleFTSEReport2012 
  5. Trajectory of Increase 2011 ­ 2020  www.bit.ly/FemaleFTSE2012 
  6. FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 Comparison At January 2012  FTSE 100  FTSE 250  Female‐held directorships  163 (15%)  189 (9.4%) Female executive directorships  20 (6.6%)  28 (4.6%) Female non‐executive  143  168 directorships  (22.4%)  (11.4%) Companies with female executive  17 (17%)  25  (10.0%) directors Companies with at least one  89 (89%)  135 (54%) female director Companies with multiple female  50 (50%)  47 (18.8%) directors  www.bit.ly/FemaleFTSEReport2012 
  7. Davies Report One Year On Impact of the Davies Report has been the multiple stakeholder  approach to the issue of WoB:  Chairmen and CEOs  Institutional Investors  Financial Reporting Council  Executive Search Firms  The suboptimal utilisation of talent  involves both genders…this is not a  women’s issue  www.bit.ly/DaviesInterim 
  8. EU Commission meeting on  Women on Boards  19 EEA countries     Although most of the barriers were the same,  different mixtures and emphases    Some fundamental differences around:   Corporate Structures   Corporate ownership   Governance   Political intervention   
  9. EU – No ‘one size fits all’ A quota cluster:   Norway   State‐owned, PLC, Co‐operatives, Supervisory board,  40%    Iceland   40% by 2013    Belgium   33%, state‐owned and PLC, with financial sanctions 
  10. EU – No ‘one size fits all’ A quota cluster:   Denmark – Flexi‐quota   1,100 state‐owned and PLC, self‐determined targets,  board and top management – policy, measure, report    Germany – Flexi‐quota??? tbc 
  11. Other ‘soft target’ measures  Spain – 40% recommendations 2015, no sanctions. Previous  govt, no collaboration/support from biz/govt. 1,000 cos,  IBEX35 risen 5‐11% since 2008.  Poland – soft targets, no sanctions, sign Charters.  Ireland – state‐owned and political party targets. Not on  agenda for biz, though growing momentum.    Austria – 40% quota for state‐owned, but no sanctions. From  July 2012, PLCs annual gender reporting – gender strategy,  policy and report, ‘comply or explain’. Women are in the  system, issues of political will and power. May require strong  intervention for change.   
  12. A temporary law   The Netherlands – 30% for supervisory and management  board, voluntary, no sanctions. Have had Charter for a few  years. Works Councils, employee representatives.        4,500 co.s but unrealistic – ED 3.2%, NED 6.0% to 30% by 2016 
  13. Some societies not ready…   Pragmatically    – e.g. Malta,    Estonia.    Culturally    Lithuania,    Slovak Republic 
  14. Summary: Quotas, Targets or  Voluntary Measures 1. Voluntary Measures – differences in understanding and  implementation     Large range of measures aimed at different stakeholders  including women, at different levels     Differences in implementation – role of government,  direct or ‘indirect’. 
  15. Summary (cont.) 2. Issues of ‘supply’ and ‘demand’    Discussions on influencing demand – ROI on education,  talent argument, change attitudes     Caution regarding ‘supply’ side argument. Several  countries need to question the myth.  However, for  some it’s very real and measures implemented to  develop country’s human capital 
  16. Summary (cont.) 3. No silver bullet – at an EU or country level    Just supervisory boards is insufficient, but normative  importance of having WoB for longer term role modelling     Considerable efforts needed on pipeline issues for all     Governance, societal, cultural, and political considerations     Social & Political backgrounds and moments of possibility  vary…each country to judge when to boost its position. 
  17. The myth of the “Golden Skirts” 
  18. Multiple Directorships  Total UK FTSE 100 Boards  1 seat  2 seats  3 seats  4 seats  Directors  88.7%    10.1%    1.2%      0 Male Directors  820  (727)  (83)  (10)    85.8%     12.8%     1.4%        0 Female Directors  141  (121)  (18)  (2)   In Norway “Although there has been a growth in the number of women with multiple board positions, data from Norway shows that the majority of board members sit on only one board, and that this applies for slightly more women than men. In other words, more men than women sit on multiple boards.” – Tiegen, 2012  
  19. The Pipeline myth  “Of course I’d love to put a  women on our board…but  the problem is, we can’t find  one” ‐ Chairman 
  20. Let’s get some perspective on  the pipeline… Index  % WoB  %  Female  No. of WoB  No of Fem.  Snr Mgrs  Snr Mgrs FTSE 100  161 FTSE 250  7.8%  16.6%  154  362 FTSE AIM  5.1%  15.9%  296  706 FTSE Small Cap  7.6%  17.1%  122  258 FTSE Techmark 100  7.4%  15.2%  37  120 FTSE TechAllshare  7.8%  15.6%  49  151 FTSE Fledgling  6.5%  17.8%  48  87  706  1845 Women in pipeline to FTSE 100 board position  2,551  From Female FTSE Report 2010 
  21. There are currently 1,086 directors on FTSE 100  Of which 163 are held by women 30% of 1,086 is 325  We only need another 162 women 
  22. Myth: the use of Executive Search Firms means the appointment process is fair  Higgs Review 2003    Chairmen and ESF collusion  (2010)    Improvements since Davies  Report 2011    Is this just the FTSE 100?   
  23. Myth: We have equal opportunities,  it’s a matter of choice  93% of highly qualified ‘off‐ ramped’ women want to return  to work (HBR, Hewlett & Luce, 2005)    Can managers work flexibly? Is  it logistics or ‘presumed career‐ death’ from choosing to work  flexibly – significant differences  for men and women 
  24. Workplace Flexibility  Launched by Nick Clegg and Vince Cable last month    Employers Group – chaired by Sir Win Bishcoff    Approach from the organization’s perspective    Workplace flexibility pays great dividends   Anecdotal examples…    What are the aspects of normative cultures keeping us  stuck in the 20th Century? 
  25. Considering the Impacts of Policy and  Practice on Global Organizations Law Firms:   20+ years of majority female graduates  Still only 10‐20% female partners  What’s going wrong?  Investment banks  Excellent promotion processes  Still only 10‐20% female MDs  What’s going wrong?   
  26. Measure, Research, Report!  What are the policies and real practices that are  perpetuating the outmoded ways of working?   What hasn’t worked? What is currently working?  And What will work going forward? 

×