0
Service Work – Skills, Professions, Occupations - and Innovation Barbara Jones & Ian Miles
This seminar <ul><li>Skills & Innovation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the consequences of innovations & innovation traj...
Features of Service Work <ul><li>ECWS – European Working Conditions Survey  2005 edition   </li></ul><ul><li>Report prese...
Gender & Full/Part-time composition of Employment – ECWS 2005 Services are more feminised – & often have substantial part-...
Data from European Working Conditions Survey 2005 Service Sector work – more liable to be dealing with customers More than...
More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work is VERY IT-intensive – but not Hotels
Yet More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work is highly complex, some quite monotonous – but  all  sectors feature both...
Even More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work involves scope to learn and be creative
Summary: Features of Work across   Different Sectors, Europe 2005
Features of Work across   4 Occupational Groups Europe 2005 – deviations from overall average for employees KIS work Own i...
Ten Generic Skills <ul><li>Alan Felstead, Duncan Gallie, Francis Green  (2002)  Work Skills in Britain 1986-2001  and othe...
UK 2001 – basic skills -1.0  -0.5  0.0  0.5  1.0
UK 2001– Communication Skills,  -0.5  0.0  0.5
UK 2001 – three skill sets -0.5  0.0  0.5
In all of these studies <ul><li>We see the striking distinctions between more physical and personal services, and more inf...
Sectors    Jobs <ul><li>A great deal of the variation across industries is related to the different distribution of occup...
ISCO – international standard classification of occupations 1: legislators, senior officials & managers 2: professionals 3...
Occupations by Sector CEDEFOP data, ISCO categories across major sectors in EU
Service Workers – more IT, less machinery - EWCS
Working with nonemployees – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & R...
Working with IT – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRA...
Features of work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TR...
Complex/ monotonous work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RE...
Creativity/ learning at work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT ...
Summary: Features of Work across   Different Occupational Groups, Europe 2005
From UK survey report: <ul><li>‘ Professional Occupations’ tend to require the highest skill levels. </li></ul><ul><li>The...
Skills in occupations <ul><li>Basic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Generic KI skills </li></ul><ul><li>Technical KI skills, spec...
Skill  profiles <ul><li>Basic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Generic KI skills </li></ul><ul><li>Technical KI skills, specialise...
Generic Skills <ul><li>A) Behavioural and personal skills: </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility, Self Learning, Motivation and Co...
Technical Skills - example <ul><li>ICT marketing, consulting and sales   </li></ul><ul><li>ICT Business and Project Manage...
Literature on Skills Trends <ul><li>Job Broadening widely reported </li></ul><ul><li>- especially new IT-related skills ac...
Over to Barbara!
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Work Skills Occupations and Innovation 2010 Ser Inn Bman62052 4

774

Published on

Fourthy seminar for Service Innovation module Bman62052 4

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
774
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
32
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • data, which confirm that KISA professions are engaged in the more complex, demanding, and knowledge-intensive forms of work. The CEDEFOP (2008) study suggests that these types of occupation will be become more prevalent in future years, as a result of structural change in the economy (growing importance of services) and in industries (growing importance of KISA work).
  • Transcript of "Work Skills Occupations and Innovation 2010 Ser Inn Bman62052 4 "

    1. 1. Service Work – Skills, Professions, Occupations - and Innovation Barbara Jones & Ian Miles
    2. 2. This seminar <ul><li>Skills & Innovation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the consequences of innovations & innovation trajectories for service work & skill requirements? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What are skills, anyway? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does service work shape the innovation process? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>When & How is service work innovative? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>But first: what do we know about service work? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Features of Service Work <ul><li>ECWS – European Working Conditions Survey 2005 edition  </li></ul><ul><li>Report presents data across occupations and sectors, for EU25+, of such features as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working conditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exercise of skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creativity etc. </li></ul></ul>http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/ewco/surveys/index.htm
    4. 4. Gender & Full/Part-time composition of Employment – ECWS 2005 Services are more feminised – & often have substantial part-time work http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/ewco/surveys/
    5. 5. Data from European Working Conditions Survey 2005 Service Sector work – more liable to be dealing with customers More than half – more than 2/3
    6. 6. More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work is VERY IT-intensive – but not Hotels
    7. 7. Yet More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work is highly complex, some quite monotonous – but all sectors feature both types of work
    8. 8. Even More from EWCS 2005 SOME Service Sector work involves scope to learn and be creative
    9. 9. Summary: Features of Work across Different Sectors, Europe 2005
    10. 10. Features of Work across 4 Occupational Groups Europe 2005 – deviations from overall average for employees KIS work Own ideas New Things Complex Monotonous Unforeseen problems Use Internet Use computers Nonemployees
    11. 11. Ten Generic Skills <ul><li>Alan Felstead, Duncan Gallie, Francis Green (2002) Work Skills in Britain 1986-2001 and other reports </li></ul><ul><li>Literacy Skills : both reading and writing forms, notices, memos, signs, letters, short and long documents etc.. </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Skills : the use of physical strength and/or stamina. </li></ul><ul><li>Number Skills : adding, subtracting, divisions, decimal point or fraction calculations etc., and/or more advanced maths or statistical procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>Technical ‘Know-How’ : knowing how to use tools or equipment or machinery, knowing about products and services, specialist knowledge and/or skill in using one’s hands. </li></ul><ul><li>High-level Communication : top-down communication skills, including persuading or influencing others, instructing, training or teaching people, making speeches or presentations and writing long reports. This skill is also linked to the importance of analysing complex problems in depth. </li></ul><ul><li>Planning : planning activities, organising one’s own time and thinking ahead. </li></ul><ul><li>Client Communication : selling a product or service, counselling or caring for customers or clients. </li></ul><ul><li>Horizontal Communication : working with a team of people, listening carefully to colleagues. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-Solving : detecting, diagnosing, analysing and resolving problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Checking Skills : noticing and checking for errors. </li></ul>
    12. 12. UK 2001 – basic skills -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0
    13. 13. UK 2001– Communication Skills, -0.5 0.0 0.5
    14. 14. UK 2001 – three skill sets -0.5 0.0 0.5
    15. 15. In all of these studies <ul><li>We see the striking distinctions between more physical and personal services, and more informational, technical and professional ones </li></ul><ul><li>“‘ Hotels and Restaurants’ is an area of work demanding relatively low average levels of skill; the ‘Public Administration’ and ‘Education’ sectors, by contrast, tend to require relatively high levels of broad skills, and utilise high-level communication and literacy skills.” (UK survey report) </li></ul>
    16. 16. Sectors  Jobs <ul><li>A great deal of the variation across industries is related to the different distribution of occupations in different sectors </li></ul><ul><li>Occupational differences are more pronounced than sectoral ones (all sectors contain (almost) all jobs) </li></ul><ul><li>As well as sectoral classifications, we have occupational classifications </li></ul>
    17. 17. ISCO – international standard classification of occupations 1: legislators, senior officials & managers 2: professionals 3: technicians & associate professionals 4: clerks 5: service workers & shop & market sales workers 6: Skilled agricultural & fishery workers 7: craft & related trades workers 8: plant & machine operators & assemblers 9: elementary occupations 0: armed forces.
    18. 18. Occupations by Sector CEDEFOP data, ISCO categories across major sectors in EU
    19. 19. Service Workers – more IT, less machinery - EWCS
    20. 20. Working with nonemployees – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRADES WORKERS 6: SKILLED AGRICULTURAL & FISHERY WORKERS 5: SERVICE WORKERS & SHOP & MARKET SALES WORKERS 4: CLERKS 3: TECHNICIANS & ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS 2: PROFESSIONALS 1: LEGISLATORS, SENIOR OFFICIALS & MANAGERS
    21. 21. Working with IT – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRADES WORKERS 6: SKILLED AGRICULTURAL & FISHERY WORKERS 5: SERVICE WORKERS & SHOP & MARKET SALES WORKERS 4: CLERKS 3: TECHNICIANS & ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS 2: PROFESSIONALS 1: LEGISLATORS, SENIOR OFFICIALS & MANAGERS
    22. 22. Features of work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRADES WORKERS 6: SKILLED AGRICULTURAL & FISHERY WORKERS 5: SERVICE WORKERS & SHOP & MARKET SALES WORKERS 4: CLERKS 3: TECHNICIANS & ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS 2: PROFESSIONALS 1: LEGISLATORS, SENIOR OFFICIALS & MANAGERS
    23. 23. Complex/ monotonous work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRADES WORKERS 6: SKILLED AGRICULTURAL & FISHERY WORKERS 5: SERVICE WORKERS & SHOP & MARKET SALES WORKERS 4: CLERKS 3: TECHNICIANS & ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS 2: PROFESSIONALS 1: LEGISLATORS, SENIOR OFFICIALS & MANAGERS
    24. 24. Creativity/ learning at work – by occupation 9: ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 8: PLANT & MACHINE OPERATORS & ASSEMBLERS 7: CRAFT & RELATED TRADES WORKERS 6: SKILLED AGRICULTURAL & FISHERY WORKERS 5: SERVICE WORKERS & SHOP & MARKET SALES WORKERS 4: CLERKS 3: TECHNICIANS & ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS 2: PROFESSIONALS 1: LEGISLATORS, SENIOR OFFICIALS & MANAGERS
    25. 25. Summary: Features of Work across Different Occupational Groups, Europe 2005
    26. 26. From UK survey report: <ul><li>‘ Professional Occupations’ tend to require the highest skill levels. </li></ul><ul><li>There is widespread use of computers, and computers are especially important to the jobs, in ‘Professional’, ‘Managerial’, ‘Associate Professional’ and ‘Administrative and Secretarial’ occupations. Computers are much less important for jobs in ‘Plant and Machine Operative’, ‘Skilled Trades’, ‘Personal Service’ and ‘Elementary’ occupations. Similarly, complexity of use is strongly related to occupational group. </li></ul><ul><li>More skilled jobs typically require higher levels of discretion over job tasks. Despite this, the rise in skills among employees has not been accompanied by a corresponding rise in the control they can exercise over their jobs. Rather there has been a marked decline in task discretion. For example, the proportion of employees reporting a great deal of choice over the way they do their job fell from 52 percent in 1986 to 39 percent in 2001. The proportions reporting a great deal of influence over what tasks are done fell from 42 percent in 1992 to 30 percent in 2001. This decline occurred for both men and women. ‘Professional’ workers have witnessed a particularly sharp decline in their control. </li></ul>
    27. 27. Skills in occupations <ul><li>Basic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Generic KI skills </li></ul><ul><li>Technical KI skills, specialised to particular KISA </li></ul>Each can be possessed and exercised to various levels of depth
    28. 28. Skill profiles <ul><li>Basic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Generic KI skills </li></ul><ul><li>Technical KI skills, specialised to particular KISA </li></ul>Each can be possessed and exercised to various levels of depth <ul><ul><li>O*Net framework: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic skills; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complex Problem Solving; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource Management; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social skills; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systems skills; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical skills </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Generic Skills <ul><li>A) Behavioural and personal skills: </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility, Self Learning, Motivation and Commitment, Stress Resistance and Emotion, Responsibility, Managing Risks, Decision Making, Negotiation, Initiative and Attention, Persuasiveness, Professional Attitude (Business or Technical Orientation and Interests). </li></ul><ul><li>B) Cross section and basic work and technical skills: </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Awareness, Commercial and Market Awareness, Entrepreneurship, Customer Orientation and Relationship, Company and Business Organisation, Work and Project Organisation, Business and Work Process Knowledge, Work Safety and Health Protection, Labour Law and Data Privacy, Environmental and Resource Awareness; </li></ul><ul><li>C) Soft and method skills: </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and Moderation, Languages and Culture, Collaboration and Interaction, Teamwork and Mentoring, Conflict and Consensus, Creative and Innovation, Analytical and Reasoning, Problem Analysis and Solving, Strategy, Conception and Planning, Context and Causal Connection Thinking, Information Handling, Documentation and Presentation. </li></ul>Source: Petersen et al
    30. 30. Technical Skills - example <ul><li>ICT marketing, consulting and sales </li></ul><ul><li>ICT Business and Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>ICT Systems and Application Development </li></ul><ul><li>‘ ICT Integration and Administration’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ ICT infrastructure and installation’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ ICT support and systems service’ </li></ul>Source: Petersen et al
    31. 31. Literature on Skills Trends <ul><li>Job Broadening widely reported </li></ul><ul><li>- especially new IT-related skills across most KISA </li></ul><ul><li>Also demands to have more interpersonal/management/sales skills to relate to teams, customers, different knowledge bases </li></ul><ul><li>Little discussion of deskilling – even in context of offshoring </li></ul>
    32. 32. Over to Barbara!
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×