Open Innovation and Intellectual Property

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Brief points to accompany chairing a session on Open Innovation and Intellectual Property at the PATINNOVA conference in Prague, April 2009

Brief points to accompany chairing a session on Open Innovation and Intellectual Property at the PATINNOVA conference in Prague, April 2009

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Transcript

  • 1. D. Evolution of the IP system D2: IP rights and open innovation Chair: Ian Miles Manchester Institute of Innovation Research MBS
  • 2. Beneath the surface
    • Our attention tends to be fixated on the things that are easy to see – in the case of IP, that is especially patents. Which mean different things to different parties.
    • But we know there are many other forms of IP protection, including
    • other formal instruments,
    • contracts of various kinds, and
    • informal mechanisms.
    • IP strategy typically involves mixtures of these.
  • 3. When Icebergs Collide…
  • 4. Open Innovation Open Source User-Generated Innovation Crowdsourcing Outsourcing Collaborative R&D Distributed Innovation Processes Innovation Systems and Networks…
  • 5. What’s New?
    • Innovation “beyond the boundaries of the firm” has been around for a very long time – Europe is familiar with innovation networks; innovation supporting services in R&D, design, consultancy, integration, and much more; collaborative projects in research, standards-setting, market development, and much more….
    • These are almost certainly becoming more important
    • And there are two qualitatively different features of Open Innovation today
  • 6. NEW FEATURES - 1
    • Information Technology and Cyberculture
    • FLOSS, Open Source, as a model for software development
    • Web 2.0 social networking for content, creative, and other novelty
    • New IT-based tools to support collaborative working, crowdsourcing, etc.
    • These can be important beyond the IT and software sectors – eg Lego
  • 7. NEW FEATURES - 2
    • Changing Management Paradigms in the Knowledge Economy
    • Focus on Core Competences  Outsourcing (and Offshoring) of Basic and Sophisticated Functions for Efficiency and Effectiveness
    • Increasingly Complex and Multifaceted Knowledge Requirements  Need to mobilise social and technical knowledge from diverse sources
    • Cooperation alongside competition  Serious rethinking about how innovation should be conducted, and by whom
  • 8. Benefits of O.I.
    • Not just cost-saving and economies of scale; not even just more flexible and agile…
    • Access to specialist knowledge, skills, and other capabilities
    • Closer to business partners and users
    • Exposure to alternative ways of organising innovative effort
    • Learning more about the innovation system – including users
  • 9. Open Innovation Iceberg
    • IT & Cyberculture Management Paradigms
    • A huge range of different OI approaches:
    • One-off versus embedded strategy
    • Substantial collaboration versus scanning and polling Funded research programmes (enforcing OI) versus autonomous initiatives
    • Few versus many collaborators
    • Hub-and-spoke versus (virtual) networks
    • Innovation specialists (suppliers, firms, Universities, KIBS) versus users (customer firms, even consumers), and employees in different divisions
  • 10. What, where, and who
    • With many partners engaged in Open Innovation, from diverse backgrounds and knowledge bases
    • Variations in IP instruments and strategies
    • Likely to be many diverse experiences – so need to look for patterns beyond the usual suspects – or at least, be very cautious about assuming that looking at the tips of the icebergs tells us the story of what lies beneath.
  • 11. Panorama
    • Our presenters will be:
    • John Rigby, Manchester Business School
    • Stuart Smith, 3 Sheep (SME)
    • Jako Eleveld, Philips
  • 12. End of presentation