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Photo:DavidBrazier/IWMIPhoto:TomvanCakenberghe/IWMI
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Photo:AndreaSilverman/IWMI
Data Coll...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
The Study
• The aim of this study is to assess the impact of savings and internal lendin...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Expected Impacts
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Our Sample
Sustainability Through Economic
Strengthening Prevention an Support for
Orpha...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Study Population
We will seek participation from six population groups:
•Heads of Househ...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Household Interviews
• Head of Household Questionnaire (background information, househol...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Data Collection Procedure – HH
Interviews
• 1. Enter household & get consent from head o...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Data Collection Procedure – HH
Numbering
• Province/Ward/household number (1-32)/intervi...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Data Collection Procedure – HH
Numbering
If interview teams split up, they should make s...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Data Collection Procedure – HH
Numbering
• Interviewed households need a code to follow ...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Progress out of Poverty Index
• The Progress out of Poverty Index® (PPI®) is a poverty m...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
GPS
• Whats a GPS?
• Why do we need GPS?
• The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a sate...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
GPS
How it works?
• GPS satellites circle the earth twice a day in a very precise orbit ...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
Latitude and Longitude
The latitude (abbreviation: Lat., φ, or phi) of a point on the Ea...
www.iwmi.org
A water-secure world
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Impact evaluation of savings and internal lending communities

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Transcript of "Impact evaluation of savings and internal lending communities"

  1. 1. Photo:DavidBrazier/IWMIPhoto:TomvanCakenberghe/IWMI www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Photo:AndreaSilverman/IWMI Data Collector Training 25 to 29th March 2013 Dr Valentine J Gandhi Lusaka, Zambia Impact Evaluation of Savings and Internal Lending Communities
  2. 2. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world The Study • The aim of this study is to assess the impact of savings and internal lending communities (SILC), a community savings group model, on participants, households, and children over time, and to document the factors contributing to implementation scale-up success. • The primary objective of this study is to assess the impact of caregivers’ participation in SILC on children’s food security—specifically, regular food consumption over time. • The primary hypothesis of this study is: Children aged 2-17 in households where the caregiver or head f household participates in SILC will achieve higher, improved food consumption compared to children aged 2-17 in non-SILC households, as measured by % of children aged 2-17 who have gone a whole day and night without eating in the last four weeks. • This is a longitudinal, quasi-experimental study with intervention and comparison groups. The study applies a multi-stage cluster sampling approach whereby a sample of SILC households in select STEPS OVC SILC wards will be compared with households in nearby wards where SILC has not yet been established. Participants and households in both groups will take part in an annual interviewer- administered survey for three study years. Systematic follow up during and following STEPS OVC implementation will allow for retrospective analysis of dose-response, sub-group analysis, and evaluation of the sustainability of both SILC and outcomes of participation. Our approach to data analysis will maximize generalizability of findings and relevance to international and community- based organizations working outside of Zambia.
  3. 3. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Expected Impacts
  4. 4. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Our Sample Sustainability Through Economic Strengthening Prevention an Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children, Youth and Other Vulnerable Populations (STEPS-OVC)
  5. 5. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Study Population We will seek participation from six population groups: •Heads of Household •SILC Participants •Primary Caregivers •Children aged 0-9 years (questions will be directed to the Primary Caregiver) •Children aged 10-17 years •SILC Field Agents Several of these groups may be overlapping. For instance, in most cases the SILC Participant will also be the Head of Household or Primary Caregiver. Inclusion criteria: •Intervention group: At least one household member participants in SILC, a community savings group, and at least one household member receives services through the USAID-funded STEPS OVC project. All household members aged 10 and above will be interviewed with adult consent and child assent. •Comparison group: At least one household member receives services through the USAID-funded STEPS OVC project. All household members aged 10 and above will be interviewed with adult consent and child assent. Exclusion criteria: STEPS OVC SILC households that do not have any children will be ineligible to participate in this study. Participants who do not provide informed consent, or assent in the case of children aged 10-17, or who lack the mental capacity to consent, as determined by the trained data collector, will be ineligible to participate.
  6. 6. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Household Interviews • Head of Household Questionnaire (background information, household schedule, household economic status, household food security, social capital and self-efficacy, gender roles and decision-making power, illness and health seeking behavior, external support) • SILC Member Questionnaire (background information, SILC, social capital and self- efficacy, gender roles and decision-making power, illness and health seeking behavior, participation) • Primary Caregiver Questionnaire (background information, social capital and self-efficacy, gender roles and decision-making power, illness and health seeking behavior, listing of children in care) • Child Questionnaire, ages 0-9 years, directed to Primary Caregiver (health and welfare, education and work, external support, weight and height) • Child Questionnaire, ages 10-17 (diary, education, chores and work, food security, health and welfare, external support, weight and height)
  7. 7. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Data Collection Procedure – HH Interviews • 1. Enter household & get consent from head of household (for both his/her participation and participation of children in household) • 2. Apply head of HH questionnaire and PPI • 3. Apply SILC questionnaire. If Head of HH is the SILC participant, just proceed with new sections (#2 & #6). If a different household member is the SILC participant, get consent from new person. • 4. Apply primary caregiver questionnaire. If SILC participant is also primary caregiver, proceed with questionnaire. If a different household member is the primary caregiver, get consent from new person. • 5. Apply child aged 0-9 questionnaire to primary caregiver. (You can choose index child for pilot – see note below) • 6. Apply child aged 10-17 questionnaire to youth. Get child informed assent prior to administering questionnaire. (You can choose index child for pilot – see note below)
  8. 8. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Data Collection Procedure – HH Numbering • Province/Ward/household number (1-32)/interviewee number • All household numbers would be taken from the sampling frame (and if replacements occur, we add, e.g., 33, 34). • For example: • C/Kashiba/1/1
  9. 9. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Data Collection Procedure – HH Numbering If interview teams split up, they should make sure not to duplicate numbers. Generally there should be 4 interviews per household, though in some cases there will be 5. Generally it will be: • Head of household=1 • Primary caregiver =2 • Child aged 0-9=3 • Child aged 10-17=4 • (SILC participant is either 1 or 2, though if another person, we could agree that this be 5)
  10. 10. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Data Collection Procedure – HH Numbering • Interviewed households need a code to follow up. Household number, GPS, Phone Number. Children’s details.
  11. 11. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Progress out of Poverty Index • The Progress out of Poverty Index® (PPI®) is a poverty measurement tool for organizations and businesses with a mission to serve the poor. • The PPI is statistically-sound, yet simple to use: the answers to 10 questions about a household’s characteristics and asset ownership are scored to compute the likelihood that the household is living below the poverty line – or above by only a narrow margin. • With the PPI, organizations can identify the clients, customers, or employees who are most likely to be poor or vulnerable to poverty, integrating objective poverty data into their assessments and strategic decision-making.
  12. 12. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world GPS • Whats a GPS? • Why do we need GPS? • The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system made up of a network of 24 satellites placed into orbit by the U.S. Department of Defense. GPS was originally intended for military applications, but in the 1980s, the government made the system available for civilian use. GPS works in any weather conditions, anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day. There are no subscription fees or setup charges to use GPS.
  13. 13. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world GPS How it works? • GPS satellites circle the earth twice a day in a very precise orbit and transmit signal information to earth. GPS receivers take this information and use triangulation to calculate the user's exact location. • Essentially, the GPS receiver compares the time a signal was transmitted by a satellite with the time it was received. The time difference tells the GPS receiver how far away the satellite is. Now, with distance measurements from a few more satellites, the receiver can determine the user's position and display it on the unit's electronic map.
  14. 14. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Latitude and Longitude The latitude (abbreviation: Lat., φ, or phi) of a point on the Earth's surface is the angle between the equatorial plane and a line that passes through that point and is normal to the surface of a reference ellipsoid, which approximates the shape of the Earth. This line passes a few kilometers away from the center of the Earth except at the poles and the equator where it passes through Earth's center. Lines joining points of the same latitude trace circles on the surface of the Earth called parallels, as they are parallel to the equator and to each other. The north pole is 90° N; the south pole is 90° S. The 0° parallel of latitude is designated the equator, the fundamental plane of all geographic coordinate systems. The equator divides the globe into Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The Longitude (abbreviation: Long., λ, or lambda) of a point on the Earth's surface is the angle east or west from a reference meridian to another meridian that passes through that point. All meridians are halves of great ellipses (often improperly called great circles), which converge at the north and south poles.
  15. 15. www.iwmi.org A water-secure world Final slide Title
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