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Leadership in Decline: Assessing U.S. International Competitiveness in Biomedical Research
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Leadership in Decline: Assessing U.S. International Competitiveness in Biomedical Research

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The United States’ leadership position in biomedical research is no longer assured, especially as the governments of an increasing number of countries are investing more in life sciences research as a …

The United States’ leadership position in biomedical research is no longer assured, especially as the governments of an increasing number of countries are investing more in life sciences research as a share of their GDP than the United States.

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  • Benefits from scientific research in WWII included antibiotics, saving tens of thousands of lives (also radar, fission…).Policy to fund science research in general, and biomedical in particular, really took off in 1948.Major funding surge with War on Cancer (1971; Nixon).
  • NIH Funding Trajectory:Steady increases since 1948;Major increase with War on Cancer (1971);Congress pledged to double funding ;Pledge met by 2002/3but not sustained; steady declines since 2003 except for ARRA blip;7.8% cuts planned under sequestration ($2.4B).
  • Average success rate of first time grant applicants has steadily declined from 58% (1963) to less than 20% (2011); average age of first time recipients has increased from 34 (1970) to 42 (2005).Huge backlog of good ideas and promising opportunities unfunded; stunted careers and enormous opportunity costs.
  • China spending twice as much in constant dollars, 4x as much as share of GDP;
  • US funding essentially flat while every other country considered is increasing support.
  • Caveat – different countries have varying thresholds for patentability. China’s threshold is lower than US, so the significance of the apparent shift may be somewhat exaggerated, but the curves of the slopes are valid nevertheless…
  • 0.25% of US GDP ~ 40 Billion/year.
  • 0.25% of US GDP ~ 40 Billion/yearSupportive policies are essential to maximizing ROI; without good policies investments will be inefficient. We need funding increases but also tax/regulatory/immigration reforms.
  • 0.25% of US GDP ~ 40 Billion/yearSupportive policies are essential to maximizing ROI; without good policies investments will be inefficient. We need funding increases but also tax/regulatory/immigration reforms.
  • 0.25% of US GDP ~ 40 Billion/yearSupportive policies are essential to maximizing ROI; without good policies investments will be inefficient. We need funding increases but also tax/regulatory/immigration reforms.

Transcript

  • 1. May 17, 2012Leadership in Decline: AssessingU.S. InternationalCompetitivenessin Biomedical ResearchPresenters:Dr. Robert D. Atkinson, President, ITIFRepresentative Kevin Yoder, (Kansas-3)Dr. Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of HealthScott Bruder, SVP/Chief Science & Technology Officer, BDLandon S. King, Vice Dean for Research, Johns Hopkins Medicine
  • 2. U.S. Competitiveness in Biomedical Research U.S. global leadership grew from the value of scientific research proven in World War II. 2
  • 3. U.S. Competitiveness in Biomedical Research U.S. global leadership grew from the value of scientific research proven in World War II. Federally funded biomedical research has been a key input both to new drugs and biologics and entirely new companies. 3
  • 4. Selected Biotech Cos. with Origins in Fed-Funded University Research1. Adenosine Therap. 15. GeoVax Labs 29. PolyMedix2. Advaxis 16. HealthMeda 30. Paxis Biologics3. Agensys 17. iCardiac Techs. 31. Protea Bioscience4. ArmaGen Techs. 18. ImmuneWorks 32. Response Genetics5. Aursos 19. Integrated Genomics 33. Saneron-CCEL6. Avid Radiopharma 20. Kinex Pharma 34. TetraLogic Pharma7. AzERx 21. Maroon Biotech 35. Therametric Techs8. BioMarck Pharma 22. MicroMRI 36. TomoTherpay9. BioNanomatrix 23. Momenta Pharma 37. Transgenex Nanobio10. Cerluean Pharma 24. Nanopharma Techs 38. Triangle Pharma11. CS-Keys 25. Natura Therapeutics 39. Vaccinex12. Fast Diagnostics 26. ONY 40. VGX Pharma13. FluGen 27. Pacific Biosciences 41. Xenogen14. Genentech 28. Pharmasset 42. Ximerex
  • 5. U.S. Competitiveness in Biomedical Research U.S. global leadership grew from the value of scientific research proven in World War II. Federally funded biomedical research has been a key input to both new drugs and biologics and entirely new companies. Major economic benefits & consistently high returns on federal research investment (societal ROI greater than 30% per yr). U.S. life sciences industry today = 7 million jobs & $69B in GDP. 5
  • 6. U.S. Leadership Today is Under Threat1. Life science research funding has not kept pace with inflation, much less Congress’ pledge to double NIH funding. 6
  • 7. NIH Funding in Real Dollars is Down 7
  • 8. As a Result, It’s Harder to Win an NIH Grant 8
  • 9. U.S. Leadership Today is Under Threat1. Funding has not kept pace with inflation, much less Congress’ pledge to double.2. Competitors ramping up efforts with intent to stake their own claims on global leadership:  China spending $308B over next 5y (4x U.S. as share GDP); leads world in DNA sequencing capacity.  Germany, India, Singapore, Sweden, UK, etc. all increasing funding and honing policies to gain global market share. 9
  • 10. Government Funded R&D for Medical Science 10
  • 11. Country Shares of Global Biopharmaceutical Patents 11
  • 12. Country Shares of Global Pharmaceutical Output ’ 12
  • 13. Many Other Nations Expanding Trade Surplus 13
  • 14. What Is To Be Done?1. We cannot get out of our current budget dilemma by cutting investment.2. Growth driven by investment is critical to good jobs, GDP growth and overall federal tax revenues. As such Congress should distinguish between investment and consumption expenditures.3. Biomedical research is not a luxury; it is an essential keystone for economic growth (and human health improvement) in the 21st century. 14
  • 15. Policy Recommendations1. Congress should target sustained funding for NIH of at least 0.25% of GDP. 15
  • 16. Policy Recommendations1. Congress should target sustained funding for NIH of at least 0.25% of GDP.2. Life sciences funding in other agencies (e.g., DOE, USDA) should be increased commensurately. 16
  • 17. Policy Recommendations1. Congress should target sustained funding for NIH of at least 0.25% of GDP.2. Life sciences funding in other agencies (e.g., DOE, USDA) should be increased commensurately.3. Funding increases should be steady year over year. 17
  • 18. Policy Recommendations1. Congress should target sustained funding for NIH of at least 0.25% of GDP.2. Life sciences funding in other agencies (e.g., DOE, USDA) should be increased commensurately.3. Funding increases should be steady year over year.4. Supportive policies are also critical (e.g., tax incentives; FDA reform; high-skill immigration; and targeted trade enforcement against foreign life sciences’ mercantilist practices). 18
  • 19. Thank Robert Atkinson ratkinson@itif.org You!Follow ITIF: Facebook: facebook.com/innovationpolicy Blog: www.innovationfiles.org YouTube: www.youtube.com/techpolicy Website: www.itif.org Twitter: @ITIFdc