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  • change . . . climatic, demographic, economic
  • change . . . climatic, demographic, economic
  • It is clear from a global perspective that growth along current trajectories using today’s technologies is bound to fail. It would exceed planetary boundaries that ensure stability in our food production systems and lead to environmental degradation that will stop growth and even threaten major reversals of living standards through pollution, deforestation, water scarcity, famines, floods, displacement, and collapsing agricultural productivity.
  • WLE focuses on agriculture as a key risk management strategy to ensure that the trajectory of growth in the world does not endanger human lives and destroy ecosystems and the economies that are built on the ecosystem functions and services.
  • Note importance of IDOs that address performance of the entire natural resource system within which poverty and food security are to be achieved.
    This aligns with the “Strategy and Results Framework” and sets out a prioritized research agenda based on feasible impact pathways with a plan of delivery from outputs to outcomes to IDOs, which support the SLOs.
    Note: ISPC interested in systematic analysis of linkages and hierarchy between various pathways to impact and clarification of assumptions and clear prioritization for planning and monitoring.
  • Ten WLE target basins and regions are: the Andes, Limpopo, Zambezi, Volta, Niger, Nile, Indus and Ganges, Mekong, Amu Darya and Syr Darya, and Tigris and Euphrates. These regions were selected based on specific criteria: clear opportunity in the policy space, strength and interest of partners, outcomes that have the potential to be transferred and scaled. As the map above shows, current WLE investments are in some of the poorest regions of the world where there are pressing water-related problems. For instance, it works in sub-Saharan Africa where there are high levels of food insecurity and rainfall variability.
    To demonstrate in detail how WLE will contribute to SLOs and IDOs, this presentation will walk through the process for developing impact pathways in the Volta Niger region to prioritize WLEs research agenda for the region.
  • This and the next slides are intended to provide a clear example of (1) how WLE is designed and implemented to achieve development outcomes (2) stakeholder consultation (3) building on previous engagement/knowledge of CPWF (4) integration of SRPs which achieves greater than the sum of individual parts. It is obviously not a broad overview of WLE, but instead provides a slice with detail in order to highlight these key points.
    The ISPC stated that prioritization should be optimized for the context, the type of research and data and trends analysis, including analytical, economic and political perspectives and stakeholder input on priority setting. Priority setting determines scope and geographic focus, strategic alignment, and fund allocation, and supports managing and monitoring progress.
  • To achieve these development outcomes, regional decision makers expressed high priority information needs.
    WLE will assess the overall costs and benefits at different scales of various investment decisions and provide decision makers with decision support on the Returns on Investment for different intervention scenarios.

    To respond to decision makers priority information needs, WLE’s WLE strategic research portfolios (SRPs) and cross-cutting working groups are jointly designing and implement researching that results in (i) an integrated set of policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change, and (ii) decision support on the Returns on Investment for individuals as well as multiple interventions across the rainfed-irrigation landscape.

    Based on the development outcomes and the high priority information needs, WLE designed the research to impacts pathway by focusing on the key systems that support vast numbers of people and are the key to improving their livelihoods: irrigation systems, rainfed and pastoral systems and systems that recover and reuse resources. These systems interact within river basins, social systems (including issues relating to gender, poverty and institutions) and decision making.
  • ‘Information systems’ will provide an umbrella for the research and assist to prioritize intervention decisions that are most likely to reduce risk, increase security, and improve lives under projected trends in population pressure, climate and land use change, and water and land resource degradation in the region. It will also identify geographically well-defined high potential impact areas for interventions and identify indicators and information systems to assess and monitor agro-ecosystem health for improving development decisions, and develop capacity in their deployment, in support of the other research portfolios.
  • The ‘Rainfed’ program will analyse current and future land degradation and its impact on household food security and livelihoods and suggest low-cost interventions e.g. for improved green water management and soil fertility restoration with high probability of adoption based on lessons learnt from previous research. The program will also assess the viability of suggested interventions in view of in- and output markets and the financial and economic implications of proposed interventions compared to scenarios such as business-as-usual and establish investment options.
  • The Rainfed program will be supported by the research portfolio on Resource Recovery & Reuse (RRR) which will evaluate a range of business models for bringing nutrients lost with the harvested crops back into the production system through resource recovery from organic domestic and agro-industrial waste sources. RRR will also support the other SRPs with economic analysis of social and environmental benefits.
  • The ‘Irrigation’ program will support the rainfed program by identifying economically viable management opportunities for increasing land and (blue) water productivity and income, and provide year-round food supply to demographic hotspots. Furthermore, it will analyse pillars for an enabling environment to promote small holder irrigation, and carry out evaluation of a range of private, public, and private-public sector partnership models to sustain irrigation infrastructure within the basins. The Resource Recovery & Reuse program will work closely with ‘Irrigation’ to address safety concerns where polluted (grey) water sources are used for irrigation.
  • The WLE research portfolio on Basins will have a key responsibility in modelling the temporal and spatial variability in water availability to ameliorate impacts of too high or too low rainfall and stream flow on agricultural and domestic water needs by the growing population. The program will consider future scenarios of water needs from key sectors and the environment under different demographic and climate dynamics and suggest and evaluate options for buffering supply challenges to minimize risks.
  • To support the sustainability of these interventions, the WLE Working Group on Gender, Poverty & Institutions will analyse capacity needs of institutions, possible incentives for behavioural changes and required policy support to create the enabling environment for forthcoming recommendations across the target areas. The program will also work closely with the other research teams to take care that proposed interventions align with current cultural customs and do not disadvantage women or children, for example in terms of additional work load.
  • The research work by these six programs will be harmonized by the research portfolio on Ecosystem Services which is applying a system perspective and ecosystem service based management practices in the menu of intervention options. The ESS&R considers the Volta as a coupled socio-ecological system and will work closely with regional multistakeholder platforms to identity where and how ecosystem services can contribute to sustainable and resilience landscape transformation for improving the lives of the poor. Working with international research partners such as the Natural Capital Project, Ecoagriculture Partners and the Stockholm Resilience Center amongst others the ESSR will develop and refine methodology for measuring ecosystem service status and delivery within the focal region
  • This slide shows how the portfolio of integrated science outputs (designed and delivered based on stakeholder identified outcomes and information needs) will be used by stakeholder at different scales to result in outcomes.
    A key comparative advantage of WLE is working at multiple scales, which provides a unique ability to understand and address potential environmental impacts and trade-offs of development investments. Unless this is taken into consideration, a short term local gain can result in a longer-term larger scale loss (or we may miss opportunities for global scale positive benefit achieved through small scale local action). This also supports WLE’s ability to convey to decision makers the trade-offs of decision making (e.g. productivity-sustainability, productivity-equity)
    Solutions required to solve complex problems must bring multiple actors from government, civil society, private business, and citizens to problem-solve together.
    Potential beneficiaries increase at each scale. Note, however, that solutions do not typically scale across contexts – what scales is the process by which solutions are developed and shared.
    Need to modify the Research Users (these in slide are from rainfed)
    From WLE Strategic Plan: “We start with three types of systems that support vast numbers of people: irrigation systems, rainfed cropping and pastoral systems and systems that recover and reuse resources. These systems interact within river basins and landscapes, and the whole picture is affected by drivers of change, such as population growth, demographic change, economic pressure or climate change. These drivers will initiate responses, such as expansion or intensification of economic activity, in a variety of ways that will determine the impact on the systems and the livelihoods of people that rely on them. The responses can create positive or negative feedbacks, through investment or degradation of natural capital, whose condition can be quantified and understood by acquiring and analyzing information about basins and landscapes.”
  • The previous slides were intended to show a detailed “slice” of WLE operating at a specific geographic region to describe in depth how WLE is organized and integrated to deliver research outcomes.

    This slide shows how the entirety of the research program at all geographic locations and the links to IDOs and SLOs. As with the Volta basin slides, this slide appears linear to reduce visual complexity, but WLE approaches change using a non-linear service/knowledge based paradigm. This approach recognizes that change is dynamic and complex and is comprised of multiple processes between research, policy, and practice, which are shaped by multiple relations and reservoirs of knowledge. Thus, WLE envisions multiple, iterative feedback loops along the impact pathway, which are linked to WLE M&E processes and information collection.
  • “WLE M&E Strategy and Results Framework”, Version 1, July 2013
  • This is not to be read in its entirety – it is simply to provide a sample of what WLE will measure
  • WLE focuses on agriculture as a key risk management strategy to ensure that the trajectory of growth in the world does not endanger human lives and destroy ecosystems and the economies that are built on the ecosystem functions and services.
  • This framework and process has the potential (not realized yet) to support prioritization and improve coherence and integration of large portfolios of research investments so that individual investments in research are better leveraged to achieve greater outcomes
    WLE supports the new approach, which does not focus on “cookie-cutter” solutions on a process that gets us closer to better solutions better adapted to end-users.
  • Development outcomes = the institutional results (client management of WLE), environmental results (health of WLE improves), citizen results (people’s lives improve)
    outcome and impact from may become manifest at a totally different place and time
    Labeling something a ”contribution” does not solve the problem; for example, research can still be effective even if soil degradation worsens in an area. It is always possible soil degradation may have worsened more without the research
  • The World Bank President Jim Yong Kim recently called this “the science of delivery”, i.e. What does it take to get things done on the ground in challenging and complex ecosystem/political/economic and social environments?
    What we need to scale is not a particular solution or development prescription but a repeatable process that is end-user centric, disciplined and data driven. We need to consider political, social and cultural as well as technical factors when problem-solving with our partners. play multiple roles in this chain of public value creationpreferred development partner’

Transcript

  • 1. The CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE) Led by IWMI Elizabeth Weight and Andrew Noble
  • 2. Outline of presentation • Introduction • WLE IDOs • Example of the Niger/Volta Focal Region • M&E for impact • Highlights to date • WLE reflections on CGIAR Strategy Results Framework, SLOs, IDOs, impact pathways.
  • 3. The challenges facing our global food production systems
  • 4. We have exceeded 3 of 9 planetary boundaries danger of risks and uncertainties It is no exaggeration to say that natural resources depletion and degradation threaten the very future of civilization beyond their impacts on global food security and the global economy. - CGIAR Strategy and Results Framework, 2001
  • 5. The opportunity: agriculture is the dominant contributing factor and therefore a solution The status quo: ecosystems and natural capital are wholly owned subsidiaries of our agricultural production systems The paradigm shift: agricultural production systems are a wholly owned subsidiary of the ecosystems and natural capital they are dependent upon
  • 6. Water Land and Ecosystem Vision: A world in which agriculture thrives within vibrant ecosystems, where communities have higher incomes, improved food security and the ability to continuously improve their lives
  • 7. WLE contributes to CGIAR System Level Outcomes through Intermediate Development Outcomes CGIAR System Level Outcomes 1. Reduce rural poverty 2. Increase food security 3. Improve nutrition and human health 4. Sustainable management of natural resources WLE IDO Increased and more equitable income from agricultural and natural resources management and ecosystem services in rural and peri-urban areas WLE IDO Improved land, water and energy productivity in rainfed and irrigated agro-ecosystems WLE IDO Women and marginalized groups have decision making power over and increased benefits derived from agriculture and natural resources. WLE IDO Increased ability of low income communities to adapt to environmental and economic variability, demographic shifts, shocks and long term changes WLE IDO Women and marginalized groups have decision making power over and increased benefits derived from agriculture and natural resources. WLE IDO Increased resilience of communities through enhanced ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes.
  • 8. Through targeted impact pathways in focal regions and at the global level
  • 9. Outcome: Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Outcome: Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Prioritized regional development challenges and opportunities Scientific knowledge, data, forecasting and global visioning IWMI/CPWF/partners long- term stakeholder engagement Consultations, i.e. with development partners in May 2013 Example: Priority setting for WLE’s integrated research- for-development in Volta-Niger
  • 10. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 11. Photo: Tom Van Cakenberghe/IWMI WLE Strategic Research Portfolio: Information Systems Provides an umbrella for WLE research by: • Systematically supporting prioritization of intervention decisions that are most likely to reduce risks and improve lives and productivity • Designing and implementing measurement and information systems to assess and monitor agro-ecosystem health and build stakeholder capacity in their deployment
  • 12. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 13. Provides solutions to: • Reduce land degradation in rainfed landscapes • Sustain productive landscapes by increasing biodiversity • Reduce risk and tackle productivity / environment challenges in farming landscapes Photo:AkicaBahri/IWMI WLE Strategic Research Portfolio: Rainfed Farming Systems
  • 14. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 15. Provides solutions to bring nutrients back into production systems through: • Business opportunities for resource recovery and reuse • Safe wastewater and excreta reuse • Efficient water and land management in peri-urban areas • Addressing safety concerns where polluted water is used for irrigation Photo:AndreaSilverman/IWMI WLE Strategic Research Portfolio: Resource Recovery and Reuse
  • 16. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 17. Jointly with rainfed and RRR portfolios: • Identify economically viable management opportunities to increase land and (blue) water productivity for increased incomes and food security • Analyze pillars for an enabling environment to promote smallholder irrigation • Evaluate private, public, and PPP models to sustain irrigation infrastructurePhoto: Tom Van Cakenberghe/IWMI WLE Strategic Research Portfolio: Irrigated Farming Systems
  • 18. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 19. Integrates future scenarios of water needs of key sector and the environment to improve water security through: • Managing water resources’ variability and re-thinking storage in basins • Resource allocation and benefit sharing • Water and energy for food • Water data and accounting in basins WLE Strategic Research Portfolio: Basins
  • 20. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 21. Equity in gender, poverty, and institutions integrated into all WLE SRPs to support: • More equitable access to water, land and ecosystems services • Improved decision making and enabling environment (institutional, policy, capacity) for change • Investable options for women WLE Cross-Cutting Theme: Gender, Poverty and Institutions
  • 22. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio
  • 23. Applies a systems perspective to: • Develop ecosystem service-based management options • Develop and refine a methodology for measuring ecosystem service status and delivery WLE Cross-Cutting Theme: Ecosystem Services and Resilience
  • 24. Example: WLE impact pathway for the Volta-Niger – partnerships and scaling Basins Resource Recovery and Reuse IrrigationRainfed WLE Research Portfolios Gender Poverty and Institutions Information for Decision Making Ecosystem Services Sustainable increases in land and water productivity to meet future food demands Land rehabilitated and further degradation avoided in areas vulnerable to human pressure Identified Development Outcomes Applied research to facilitate required changes from extensive to intensive farming without further affecting remaining natural ecosystems and the services they deliver Agricultural strategies and policies address changing demographic patterns and climate and facilitate transition from extensive to intensive farming systems at multiple scales Identified Research Outcomes Identified Priority Information Needs WLE IDOs Integrated policy recommendations with indicators for monitoring change RoI and decision support for interventions across rainfed-irrigation landscapes Integrated Research Portfolio FARM REGIONAL/ NATIONAL GLOBAL LANDSCAPE Communities, civil society, NGOs, national extension, ARIs, IFAD, SDC Agriculture and NRM ministries, private sector, CAADP, IFAD, SDC FAO, GSP, UNCCD, GEF, UNEP, UNDP, private sector, USAID Beneficiaries:10softhousands-100softhousands-Millions
  • 25. WLE program impact pathway
  • 26. WLE Delivery of Outcomes for Volta - Niger WLE is well positioned to deliver research outcomes and contribute to IDOs in the Volta – Niger basin: • Skills and expertise to deliver integrated regional research approach prioritizing natural resources management and ecosystem services • Physical presence in the sub-region with more than five offices • More than ten years’ experience: CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF), IWMI and partners • Partnerships with leading regional change agents (e.g., ECOWAS, river basins authorities)
  • 27. Water Land and Ecosystem: M&E for Impact Organizing Principles • SLOs and IDOs • Accountability, performance management • Learning Organizing Structure • Impact pathways • Measureable targets Performance Management • Gather information on research users and their decision making processes • Shape research around uptake targets • Determine how research was/was not used and satisfaction with research • Refine targets Selected Tools • Case studies that trace the effects of research along impact pathways • Impact evaluation and theory based evaluation • Web-enabled monitoring system
  • 28. Water Land and Ecosystem: M&E for Impact Selected DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (9-12 YEARS)  Annual % decrease in the number of households (including female headed households) below the poverty line relative to a comparable control group  % decrease in the number of households affected by drought or flood  Internal rate of return on investments demonstrated to be positive  Number of farmers adopting RRR techniques (in millions)  % decrease in the number of hectares of crop affected by drought and / or flood  % annual increase in the volume of water stored as groundwater, to mitigate against drought  Annual % improvement in soil degradation rates  % of land quality assessment indicators showing at least a 5% improvement  Annual increase in the number of people (including women) participating in natural resource planning and governance mechanisms Selected RESEARCH OUTCOMES (0 TO 9 YEARS)  Km2 managed under WLE inspired projects  Number of direct beneficiaries (at least 50% women) in Millions  Value of investments made (in projects) as a result of WLE research ($US Millions)  Number of countries making significant policy changes based on WLE research  Number of countries significantly changing their resource management / development plans based on WLE research  Number of targets in the 2015 sustainable development goals which address key SRP issues  % of new IUCN/GEF projects employing WLE assessment tools or key recommendations  WLE research cited in Ramsar declarations or manuals  Number of countries where capacity development activities were implemented (outside of WLE) but based on WLE research Selected RESEARCH OUTPUTS (0-12 YEARS)  % of research identified by clients  % of research products which adequately addressed gender (as assessed by the WLE gender advisor) Selected WLE research outcomes: • Value of investments made as a result of WLE research • Number of countries changing resource management/development plans based on WLE research Selected WLE development outcomes: • Annual percent decrease in number of households below the poverty line • Annual percent improvement in soil degradation rates • Percent annual increase in volume of water stored as groundwater, to mitigate against drought • Number of businesses adopting resource recovery and reuse techniques
  • 29. WLE Highlights of Emerging Outcomes The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) are contributing to N2Africa to improve soil fertility and yields of more than 225,000 farmers smallholder farmers (more than 50% women) in sub- Saharan Africa The IWMI Tata Program’s engagement with the National Planning Commission of India resulted in incorporation of the National Irrigation Management Fund in India’s 12th Five Year Plan. Worth USD 1.25 billion, this will improve the performance of canal- based irrigation schemes and efficiency in water use. CPWF and CIAT have supported development of benefit-sharing mechanisms to maintain watersheds in Peru, in partnership with the Ministry of Environment. This will be used in the Canete River Basin as a pilot project to guide the development of benefit-sharing mechanisms in more than 30 additional basins.
  • 30. WLE reflections on CGIAR Strategy Results Framework, SLOs, IDOs, impact pathways WLE welcomes: 1. SLOs, IDOs and associated impact pathways provide a practical framework and process to drive integrated multi-sectoral and multi- partner research strategies towards development goals 2. Emphasis on research users 4. Emphasis on iteration and learning 5. Emphasis on accountability for contributions to development, specific measureable targets 6. ISPC recognition of the challenges of attribution, particularly for NRM research
  • 31. WLE Reflections on CGIAR Strategy Results Framework Requires: Well-articulated planning, clarity, support and time Meaningful multi-institution change management is a long- term process that requires changes at several levels Structures, practices, processes, personnel, policies
  • 32. WLE Reflections on CGIAR Strategy Results Framework Unless results can be attributed to research, development outcomes are not a valid performance measurement instrument CRPs should be accountable for: √ Understanding factors that determine uptake → designing research products and processes on this basis √ Producing high quality and timely research outputs √ Understanding whether research was relevant and was used √ Determining whether research outcomes were realized and why/why not Accountability of CRPs
  • 33. WLE Reflections on CGIAR Strategy Results Framework √ Development change processes and the role of research within them √ Validation of the Impact Pathway and Theory of Change approaches → Guidance for CRPs to effectively influence the conditions by which change is achieved More research is required to better understand the processes and approaches by which research contributes to positive development outcomes
  • 34. Thank You