Using the Web to improve government services

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Using the Web to improve government services - by W3C CEO - Jeffrey Jaffe

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Using the Web to improve government services

  1. 1. The Promise of eGovernment Jeff Jaffe <jeff@w3.org>
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Goals and Challenges of eGovernment
  3. 3. A Web agenda for government
  4. 4. The value of standards and W3C's role </li></ul>
  5. 5. Goals of eGovernment <ul><li>Empower citizens
  6. 6. Increase trust
  7. 7. Improve efficiency / lower cost </li><ul><li>Government-to-Citizen
  8. 8. Government-to-Business
  9. 9. Government-to-Government </li></ul></ul>W3C report: Improving Access through BetterUse of the Web
  10. 10. Expectations for eGovernment <ul><li>Digital access is becoming a “right” not a privilege
  11. 11. Government must keep up with other sectors of society regarding user expectations
  12. 12. Digital infrastructure is critical infrastructure
  13. 13. Digital infrastructure key to cost-cutting (e.g., smart grid, Web as flexible distribution channel) </li></ul>
  14. 14. Challenges <ul><li>Social </li><ul><li>status quo inertia, laws may need to change
  15. 15. factionalism and vested interests, fear of job loss
  16. 16. diverse tools, skills of target audiences
  17. 17. Big Brother shadow </li></ul><li>Technology </li><ul><li>integration of technology (wifi, rdfid, biometric, TV, mobile, ...)
  18. 18. rapidly changing technology landscape
  19. 19. tools usability
  20. 20. accessibility </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. A Web Agenda for Government <ul><li>Regulatory Environment </li><ul><li>Net neutrality, broadband, privacy, ... </li></ul><li>Good Governance </li><ul><li>Accountability, transparency, participation, government leadership ... </li></ul><li>Digital Inclusion </li><ul><li>Accessibility, usability, aging population, ... </li></ul><li>Efficiency </li><ul><li>Easier collaboration, lower costs through open standards, easy growth path, ... </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. The Value of Open Standards <ul><li>Lowers costs (seamless integration)
  23. 23. Promotes reuse of data (colleagues, departments, agencies, citizens, companies, other governments, other partners)
  24. 24. Promotes longevity of information
  25. 25. Shifts focus from software to data (avoiding vendor lock-in)
  26. 26. Encourages research </li></ul>
  27. 27. W3C and eGovernment <ul><li>Create standards of interest to government
  28. 28. Convene relevant communities (policy-makers, data experts, citizens)
  29. 29. Good practices (see our technical reports )
  30. 30. Education and Outreach </li><ul><ul><li>Tim Berners-Lee direct work with UK, US govts
  31. 31. Egovernment Interest Group
  32. 32. Participation in conferences </li></ul></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Web Standards of Interest <ul><li>Web for ubiquitous services
  34. 34. Browser as application platform (HTML5, CSS, SVG, ...)
  35. 35. Linked Data (Semantic Web)
  36. 36. Mobile Web
  37. 37. Accessibility (WCAG), Internationalization
  38. 38. Privacy, Security
  39. 39. ...in other words, much of what we do </li></ul>
  40. 40. Web 1.0: Browsing <ul><li>URLS + HTTP + HTML
  41. 41. Passive experience; no interaction
  42. 42. Limited bandwidth
  43. 43. Few devices (no mobile) </li></ul>
  44. 44. Web 1.0 for Government <ul><li>Document distribution
  45. 45. Online forms (tax returns, grant applications)
  46. 46. Public notifications (holidays, service announcements) </li></ul>
  47. 47. Web 2.0: Interaction <ul><li>Same architecture + CSS + Javascript + Flash
  48. 48. People (user content)
  49. 49. Bandwidth (video, ...)
  50. 50. Explosion of devices (mobile web, ...)
  51. 51. Beginnings of data (mashups) </li></ul>
  52. 52. Web 2.0 for Government <ul><li>Citizen-provided data
  53. 53. Campaign tools
  54. 54. Mobile Access (“bus tracker”)
  55. 55. Twitter, blogging, etc.
  56. 56. Lots of success stories, including some dramatic </li></ul>
  57. 57. Internet Response to Haiti Earthquake <ul><li>World used Open Street Map to locate services
  58. 58. Mobile access to maps helped people on the ground </li></ul>Image: Open Street Map
  59. 59. Colombian Mission in Haiti Response See more: Tim Berners-Lee's TED talk “ The Year Open Data Went Worldwide “ “ I was able to use OSM maps on my GPS. Thanks to everyone who has helped to upgrade the Port a Prince platform and its environs. After several days of intense work, three (3) lives rescued under the buildings and more than 5,000 patients that Colombian doctors and nurses have treated are another reason to thank all the support silent and anonymous people around the world have provided our humanitarian teams.” FredyRivera
  60. 60. Web 3.0?: Web of Data <ul><li>Build on Web 2.0
  61. 61. Full integration of linked data into the Web
  62. 62. Highly dynamic, data-driven, user-configurable applications (“Mashups on Steroids”) </li></ul>
  63. 63. Web 3.0 for Government <ul><li>Success stories beginning to appear
  64. 64. Open Data Example – Ordnance Survey (UK map data) </li></ul>
  65. 65. Why Linked Open Government Data <ul><li>Allows machines to do useful work (efficiencies, capabilities)
  66. 66. Well-suited to social realities </li><ul><li>Distributed (Web-scale) creation, ownership of data
  67. 67. Data merging (like databases) at global scale (RDF more adapted to merging than XML)
  68. 68. Serendipitous reuse (e.g., cross department)
  69. 69. Evolving data models
  70. 70. Evolving human relations (e.g., changes in groups of people or relations to other groups) </li></ul></ul>
  71. 71. Semantic Web: W3C's Open Standards for Linked Data Linked Open Data cloud
  72. 72. Principles for Public Data <ul><li>Complete: All Public data is made available online.
  73. 73. Primary: Public data is as collected at the source
  74. 74. Timely: Public data is made available right away
  75. 75. Accessible: Public data is available to all
  76. 76. Machine readable: Public data allow automated processing.
  77. 77. Non-discriminatory: Public data is available to anyone, no registration
  78. 78. Non-proprietary: Public data is encoded using Open Standards.
  79. 79. License-free: Public Data is available at no cost.
  80. 80. More in original open government data paper </li></ul>
  81. 81. W3C eGovernment Activity <ul><li>Past: W3C held several Workshops on eGovernment
  82. 82. Current: Interest Group with international participation
  83. 83. In discussion: Working Group focused on good practice for publishing data. See early work on publishing open government data </li></ul>
  84. 84. W3C Value Proposition – One Member's view <ul><li>international organization
  85. 85. track record
  86. 86. patent policy that works
  87. 87. neutral ground to do things that benefit the entire industry
  88. 88. mobile and internet industries both represented
  89. 89. strong academic credentials
  90. 90. participatory and strong staff
  91. 91. developer clout
  92. 92. strong sense of community </li></ul>
  93. 93. W3C Members &quot;...Deutsche Telekom...is an active participant in W3C activities. Deutsche Telekom's Internet Media Technology - using open standards - allows for flexibility and speed in adapting new technologies.&quot; &quot;Ericsson is committed to the use and development of W3C Recommendations to continue mobilizing the World Wide Web.&quot; &quot;Fujitsu supports many W3C specifications in its products and services.&quot; &quot;Nokia sees that contribution to, and adoption of, W3C specifications are essential for widespread use of the Web, with any user device.&quot; &quot;We believe the W3C's open, consensus-driven process and associated rigorous public reviews make it uniquely positioned to guide the Web's technical evolution.&quot; More Member Testimonials .
  94. 94. W3C Approach to Standards <ul><li>Work directly with industry, research leaders
  95. 95. Engage global community; liaisons
  96. 96. Maintain vendor neutrality
  97. 97. Coordinate work via expert staff
  98. 98. Provide safe IPR environment
  99. 99. Balance speed, quality, transparency, accountability </li></ul>
  100. 100. Input to the Standards Process <ul><li>W3C Workshops (Video, Augmented Reality, Privacy, ...)
  101. 101. Member Submissions (WOFF, SPARQL Update, ...) </li><ul><li>Many Submissions have moved to Rec track </li></ul><li>Incubator Groups (Library Linked Data, Audio, Social Web, ...) </li><ul><li>About ½ of XG work moves to Rec Trac </li></ul><li>Process includes public feedback, accountability
  102. 102. Research – staff connectivity, research institutes see W3C as bridge from research to standards </li></ul>
  103. 103. Vision for W3C <ul><li>Strengthen core mission
  104. 104. Make W3C the place for new standards
  105. 105. Drive a global and accessible Web
  106. 106. Increase the value proposition for users </li></ul>

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