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D Alary Dalton Coaching To Win And Teaching Positive Life Skills Through Competitive Sports
 

D Alary Dalton Coaching To Win And Teaching Positive Life Skills Through Competitive Sports

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  • “…Winning is important and trying to win is essential”
  • RQ’s: What meaning does winning hold for them? What life skills do they emphasize? How do these understandings about winning and life skills shape their coaching practice?

D Alary Dalton Coaching To Win And Teaching Positive Life Skills Through Competitive Sports D Alary Dalton Coaching To Win And Teaching Positive Life Skills Through Competitive Sports Presentation Transcript

  • d’Alary Dalton, Ed.D.
    Power of Sport Summit
    Coaching to win and teaching positive life skills in competitive sports
    dalary.dalton@duxburyreef.net
    6/7/2010
  • “Sports best achieves its positive impact on participants and society when everyone plays to win.”
  • Research shows that what matters is the way sports are designed and delivered.
    S.U.P.E.R.
    GOAL
    (VCU Life Skills Center)
    Hokowhitu Program
    (New Zealand)
  • Coacheschoose where to place the emphasis
    (Siegel, 2007)
  • Coaches’choices matter
  • What’s inside the “black box” of sports?
    (Holt & Sehn, 2008)
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Picture by Hay Kranen / PD
  • A Study of 8 WomenCoaches
  • High school coaches emphasize three important concepts:
    3
  • Winning is an important goal.
    1
  • “I just don’t always think you can control the winning… I mean, the winning is a result, it’s not the process. The process is what interests me more than the result. I love to win. I’m super competitive. So that happens naturally. I think it’s why I need to focus more on the other things.”
    (Elaine, lacrosse coach)
  • “…the girls had no idea whether they were winning or losing during the game. That shocked me. They were just so excited that they played a game of lacrosse they didn’t realize we had lost. They were so excited.”
    (Rachel, lacrosse coach)
  • 2
    Sports offer a wide varietyof life skills…
  • Trying to win is a life skill.
    3
  • “I believe that if you put in the work, sometimes you get the result you want, and sometimes you don’t, and that’s life, and that’s soccer, and I think you can learn as much from losing as you do from winning. Sometimes you learn more from losing.”
    (Sharon, soccer coach)
  • “There are some times when we lost, we put it all out there, we did our best… I always try to bring the kids back to that after the game. How did we play? Not did we win, did we lose, but how did we play?”
    (Olivia, water polo coach)
  • How do athletes understand “trying to win”?
    How does “trying to win” influence coaching?
    What are the costs of “trying to win”?
    What do we need to know?(Issues of concern…)
  • Questions?
    6/7/2010
    dalary.dalton@duxburyreef.net
  • d’Alary Dalton, Ed.D.
    Power of Sport Summit
    Coaching to win and teaching positive life skills in competitive sports
    dalary.dalton@duxburyreef.net
    6/7/2010
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