IS-Wireless is an IPR provider and software developer specializing in OFDM/OFDMA-         Course feedback    based radio i...
Our courses are targeted at a vast group of LTE specialists working for telecom vendors, mobile   operators, system integr...
Introduction to LTE                                         LTE Network versus Other Networks 2G to 4G radio and core net...
Introduction to Evolved Packet System (EPS)                 Quality of Service in LTE Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems...
Introduction to Evolved Packet System (EPS)                    UE-originated signals and PHY channels: DRS, SRS, Evoluti...
Introduction to E-UTRA TDD                                  Signal Processing for the TDD User Equipment Evolution steps ...
Introduction to E-UTRA                                              Uplink processing chain including channel coding and ...
Introduction to EPS                                                 MAC level identities mapping Evolution steps of the ...
Introduction to EPS                                              IMS Procedures and Services Evolution steps of the 3GPP ...
Introduction to EPS and Interoperability                      Combined Routing and Tracking Area Updates Evolution of 3G...
Radio Propagation Overview and Antenna                          Classification of multiple-user scenarios for MIMO usage...
Introduction to LTE Advanced                                        Idle and Connected mode issues (System info acquisiti...
LTE RF Design Process                                           Site sharing options RF Planning workflow               ...
LTE and SON Introduction                                       3GPP support for self-optimization (X2 interface, Feature...
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LTE/LTE-Advanced Training Catalogue from IS-Wireless

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To learn more about out LTE/LTE-Advanced courses, please visit our webpage: http://is-wireless.com/trainings/lte-lte-advanced

Why our courses?

The are several reasons to choose our courses. Here are the most important ones:
- all our trainers are also experienced engineers — we talk about the systems that we build ourselves
- the courses are very interactive and practical, enriched by a number of hands-on exercises
- we broadly utilize tools supporting the process of analysis, planning and evaluation of the LTE radio interface and network, while at the same time keeping the course independent from the choice of any particular tool (we are aware that our customers utilize various tools)
- the tools include link-level simulator, system-level simulator and RNP tool (set of tools depends on the course)
- we provide unrivalled post-course support

To check the upcoming courses, please visit the website: http://is-wireless.com/trainings/public-schedule.

Want to set-up an in-house course? Email us: info@is-wireless.com

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LTE/LTE-Advanced Training Catalogue from IS-Wireless

  1. 1. IS-Wireless is an IPR provider and software developer specializing in OFDM/OFDMA- Course feedback based radio interfaces. Our portfolio includes implementations of PHY layers for 3GPP Here is what course LTE and mobile WiMAX. This is complemented by a set of design services targeted participants say about our mainly at 4G operators and manufacturers. As experts working with OFDM/OFDMA courses: since 1998, we truly believe in the success of these techniques and are fully committed „Instructor was very to 3GPP LTE, aiming at solutions for LTE Advanced. knowledgeable – no such thing as a hard question!” As a part of our business routine we deliver technical courses in the area of 3GPP LTE, WiMAX, OFDM, OFDMA, MIMO, radio network planning and radio interface design. By „His experience in the field being active in system design and network planning for LTE and WiMAX, we are able to was a welcome bonus.” provide a rare mixture of great theoretical treatment together with a very practical approach. This truly leads to a solid return on investment for our customers. As an „The LTE instructor was very outcome, we continuously receive great course evaluations. Last, but not least, we are good, clear and always had providing unrivalled post-course support. an answer for all the doubts and questions.” „Very good presentations and We are proud to offer a complete and comprehensive coverage of radio-related topics good interaction with the audience. Presenter VERY describing LTE system. skilled in the subject and could explain discuss about all subjects/questions arising. Highly recommendable!” LTE Essentials „Extremely good instructor. LTE System Very competent and Overview professional.” „Excellent instructor! Very LTE Protocols clear and always withLTE PHY Layer LTE Antennas LTE Air Interface LTE Advanced answers when a doubt was and Procedures raised.” TD-LTE PHY EPC Protocols LTE RF Planning LTE SON „As a new designer I got a Layer and Procedures really good insight to the theoretical stuff, knowing what Im actually doing.” LTE Parameters LTE Interworking and Optimization* with GSM & UMTS
  2. 2. Our courses are targeted at a vast group of LTE specialists working for telecom vendors, mobile operators, system integrators, consultancies, regulators and research institutions. Depending on the course, prospective participants may be interested in the overall description of the Evolved-UTRAN (E-UTRAN) or Evolved Packet Core (EPC), in the details about E-UTRA interface and its component techniques, in protocols and procedures of the E-UTRAN and EPC network, or finally in the process of planning and optimization of the LTE network. Hence, our courses are suitable for all implementation engineers, system architects, network planners, system testers, tool developers, product managers, technical managers working with LTE or with competing systems such as WiMAX. Most of our courses require general knowledge about wireless. Should you need a customized design, modifications to the offered course or the development of some new parts, do not hesitate to let us know! We would be delighted to adapt our content to your particular needs.The are several reasons to choose our courses. Here arethe most important ones: all our trainers are also experienced engineers — we talk about the systems that we build ourselves the courses are very interactive and practical, enriched by a number of hands-on exercises we broadly utilize tools supporting the process of analysis, planning and evaluation of the LTE radio interface and network, while at the same time keeping the course independent from the choice of any particular tool (we are aware that our customers utilize various tools) the tools include link-level simulator, system-level simulator and RNP tool (set of tools depends on the course) we provide unrivalled post-course support
  3. 3. Introduction to LTE LTE Network versus Other Networks 2G to 4G radio and core network evolutions  Network migration possibilities from 2G/3G to (GSM, UMTS, HSPA, LTE and LTE Advanced) LTE 3GPP requirements imposed on LTE  LTE interworking with UMTS/GSM and (throughputs, network capacity, delays) WiMAX/WiFi Spectrum bands, bandwidths, system  LTE international roaming parameters and mobile terminal capabilities  LTE compared to WiMAX IMT-Advanced requirements for 4G system  Evolution of LTE towards 4G system (LTE advanced – features, differences, possibilities)LTE System Overview LTE network elements: terminals (mobile phone, laptop, PC), access network, core network and IMS IP in the network: All IP and always-on concepts QoS concept and parameters Security in the LTE network (IPsec and LTE security) Common IP intersystem part: IMS and its relation to IP-CANs Radio access network technologies (OFDMA, MIMO, spectrum flexibility)LTE Practical Aspects LTE performance requirements Practically achievable LTE performance (range, coverage, throughputs, number of users) Current status of LTE trials and commercial deployments Current status of spectrum auctions Possible LTE deployment scenarios Available handsets and possible evolutionLTE Services Potential 4G services Flexibly policy and charging options for operators SMS and 2G/3G voice in LTE (problems and solutions) Packet services: MBMS (mobile TV), internet access, VoD, online gaming, location services LTE as competition for fixed networksNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  4. 4. Introduction to Evolved Packet System (EPS) Quality of Service in LTE Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for  Bearer architecture including EPS bearer and end- LTE to-end service LTE bandwidths, bit rates and UE categories  Guaranteed and Non-Guaranteed Bit Rate Bearer Summary of radio access techniques  QoS Classes and QoS Class Identifier  Allocation and Retention PriorityEPS Network Architecture and Interfaces  Bit Rate limitations E-UTRA and Evolved Packet Core network  Bearer setup, service data flows and traffic flow architecture templates Nodes: UE, eNB, SGW, MME, PGW, PCRF Interfaces: Uu, X2, S1, S11, S5, Gx, S6a, SGi, Rx Evolved Packet Core IP connectivity, user plane and control plane  Overview of EPS protocols: PDCP, RRC, GTP, X2AP, Access Stratum signaling and Non-Access Stratum S1-AP, S1-MME, GTP, Diameter signaling  NAS protocols (EMM and ESM)  UE states (LTE-idle, LTE-active, LTE-detached)OFDMA, SC-FDMA and MIMO  Subscriber identities and their relations (IMEI, IMSI, Fundamentals of multipath propagation (selectivity GUTI, S-TMSI, RNTIs) in time, frequency and space)  Security and keys derivation Serial vs. parallel transmission, multicarrier  IMS network and nodes (CSCF, AAA, DNS, AS, HSS) transmission  Call establishment via IMS OFDM subcarriers and subcarrier separation, cyclic  Voice in LTE (CS Fallback, Voice Call Continuity, prefix, IFFT/FFT processing VoLGA) OFDM transceiver processing Multiuser diversity and OFDMA LTE Cross-system Procedures SC-FDMA as a subclass of OFDMA, comparison  Network Attach and Detach between SC-FDMA and OFDMA  Call setup (Dedicated bearer establishment) Multiple access with OFDMA and SC-FDMA  Tracking Area Update Multiple antenna concept  Paging Open and closed loop spatial multiplexing  Handover over X2 Multi-user MIMO  Handover over S1E-UTRA and E-UTRAN LTE Features Roadmap (Rel. 8-10) E-UTRAN protocol stack and channel architecture  Overview of features in the 3GPP E-UTRAN Release Downlink FDD frame structure and its elements 8 (sub-frames, slots, resource elements, physical  Enhancements expected in 3GPP E-UTRAN release resource blocks, PHY channels and signals) 9 including MBMS Adaptive Modulation and Coding, QPSK, 16-QAM,  Features in 3GPP E-UTRAN Release 10 i.e., LTE 64-QAM Advanced: spectrum aggregation, relay concept, Use of MIMO in 3GPP-LTE Release 8 MIMO improvements Uplink FDD frame structure and its elements (sub- frames, slots, resource elements, physical resource LTE Interworking Considerations blocks, PHY channels and signals)  Roaming E-UTRAN L3 and L2 protocols: RRC, PDCP, RLC,  Inter-working with 3GPP and non-3GPP networks MACNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  5. 5. Introduction to Evolved Packet System (EPS)  UE-originated signals and PHY channels: DRS, SRS, Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for PUCCH, PUSCH, PRACH LTE E-UTRA and Evolved Packet Core network Evaluation of the eNB and UE Transceiver architecture Operation Under Various Conditions Nodes: UE, eNB, SGW, MME and interfaces: Uu, X2,  Impact of uncorrected multipath channels S1, S11  Peak-to-average-power-ratio and its influence on Summary of the radio access techniques the transmitted signal E-UTRAN protocol stack  Pulse shaping and filtering in the time domain and System parameters (bandwidths, bands, its influence on the transmitted signal throughputs)  Synchronization mismatches in the time and frequency domain and their influence on theSignal Processing for OFDMA, SC-FDMA and received signal MIMO  Influence of various types of interferers (single- Fundamentals of multipath propagation (selectivity dominant, non-single-dominant) on the received in time, frequency and space) signal OFDM transmission, orthogonality, subcarriers, separation between subcarriers Radio Interface Procedures Time-domain and frequency-domain representation  Various traffic allocations for the FDD downlink and of the OFDM signal uplink EUTRA radio frame Guard interval and Cyclic Prefix (CP) role  Various traffic allocations for the TDD downlink and Equalization for OFDM uplink E-UTRA radio frame IDFT/DFT, IFFT/FFT  Synchronization and random access procedures Multiuser diversity and OFDMA  Scheduling for FDD SC-FDMA as a subclass of OFDMA, comparison  ARQ operation and feedback consideration between SC-FDMA and OFDMA Multiple antenna concept and related signal Processing Improvements in E-UTRA 3GPP Rel. processing 9 and Rel. 10 Open and closed loop spatial multiplexing  Usage of 8 antennas in the downlink for spatial Single-user and Multi-user MIMO multiplexing  Transmit diversity in the uplinkSignal Processing for the Evolved Node B  Spatial multiplexing in the uplink Architecture of the eNB transmitter and receiver  Coordinated MIMO including processing blocks and signals  Bandwidth aggregation E-UTRA radio frame for FDD Downlink channel architecture eNB-originated signals and PHY channels: RS, P-SS, S-SS, PBCH, PCFICH, PHICH, PDCCH, PDSCH 3GPP Rel. 8 MIMO processing with layer mapping, pre-coding and feedbackSignal Processing for the User Equipment LTE UE categories Architecture of the UE transmitter and receiver including processing blocks and signals Uplink channel architectureNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  6. 6. Introduction to E-UTRA TDD Signal Processing for the TDD User Equipment Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for  LTE UE categories LTE  Architecture of the UE transmitter and receiver E-UTRA and Evolved Packet Core network including processing blocks and signals architecture  Uplink channel architecture Nodes: UE, eNB, SGW, MME and interfaces: Uu, X2,  UE-originated signals and TDD PHY channels: DRS, S1, S11 SRS, PUCCH, PUSCH, PRACH Summary of the radio access techniques  Evaluation of the eNB and UE Transceiver E-UTRAN protocol stack Channel bandwidths and RF limitations for FDD and Operation Under Various Conditions TDD  Impact of uncorrected multipath channels  Peak-to-average-power-ratio and its influence onSignal Processing for OFDMA, SC-FDMA and the transmitted signal MIMO  Pulse shaping and filtering in the time domain and Fundamentals of multipath propagation (selectivity its influence on the transmitted signal in time, frequency and space)  Synchronization mismatches in the time and OFDM transmission, orthogonality, subcarriers, frequency domain and their influence on the separation between subcarriers received signal Time-domain and frequency-domain representation  Influence of various types of interferers (single- of the OFDM signal dominant, non-single-dominant) on the received Guard interval and Cyclic Prefix (CP) role signal Equalization for OFDM  TDD DL and UL sub-frame mismatches IDFT/DFT, IFFT/FFT Multiuser diversity and OFDMA Radio Interface Procedures SC-FDMA as a subclass of OFDMA, comparison  Various traffic allocations for the TDD downlink and between SC-FDMA and OFDMA uplink Multiple antenna concept and related signal  E-UTRA radio frame processing  Synchronization and random access procedures Open and closed loop spatial multiplexing  Scheduling for FDD and TDD Single-user and Multi-user MIMO  Hybrid ARQ operation for FDD and TDD; feedback considerationSignal Processing for the TDD Evolved Node B  TDD HARQ bundling and multiplexing Architecture of the eNB transmitter and receiver including processing blocks and signals Processing Improvements in E-UTRA 3GPP Rel. E-UTRA radio frame for FDD 9 and Rel. 10 TDD Radio frame and special sub-frame  Usage of 8 antennas in the downlink for spatial configuration multiplexing Coexistence with TD-SCDMA  Transmit diversity in the uplink Downlink channel architecture  Spatial multiplexing in the uplink eNB-originated signals and TDD PHY channels: RS,  Coordinated MIMO P-SS, S-SS, PBCH, PCFICH, PHICH, PDCCH, PDSCH  Bandwidth aggregation TDD synchronization signal mapping 3GPP Rel. 8 MIMO processing with layer mapping, pre-coding and feedbackNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  7. 7. Introduction to E-UTRA  Uplink processing chain including channel coding and rate Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for LTE matching, modulation, resource element mapping and E-UTRA and Evolved Packet Core network architecture SCFDMA signal generation Nodes: UE, eNB, SGW, MME  PUSCH hopping procedure and UE SRS procedure Interfaces: Uu, X2, S1, S11 LTE bandwidths, bit rates and UE categories LTE MAC Layer Summary of radio access techniques  MAC architecture and functions E-UTRAN protocol stack  Priority handling and multiplexing Alternative systems: Mobile WiMAX  Hybrid ARQ (HARQ) operation (Chase combining and incremental redundancy)Overview of OFDMA and SC-FDMA  HARQ processes and processing HARQ ACKs and NACKs by Fundamentals of multipath propagation (selectivity in time, PHY layer frequency and space)  Discontinuous Reception (DRX) and Semi-Persistent Basics of OFDM transmission, subcarriers, cyclic prefix, Scheduling (SPS) IFFT/FFT processing  Adaptive Modulation and Coding OFDMA and SC-FDMA as extension of OFDM  Timing Relationship and Timing Advance Multiple access with OFDMA and SC-FDMA  Scheduling Advantages and disadvantages of OFDM, OFDMA and SCFDMA LTE RRC, PDCP and RLC Layers  RRC procedures including system info broadcasting, paging,LTE Downlink PHY Layer Processing RRC connection establishment, security establishment, NAS Downlink channel architecture (radio bearers, logical, message transport and RRC connection reconfiguration transport and physical channels)  Types of radio bearers Downlink FDD frame structure and its elements (sub-frames,  RRC connection establishment: from RRC Idle to RRC slots, resource elements, physical resource blocks, PHY Connected channels and signals)  PDCP architecture and functions: robust header PHY channels and signals including: PBCH, PCFICH, PHICH, compression, ciphering and integrity protection PDCCH, PDSCH, Primary and Secondary Synchronization  RLC architecture and functions including segmentation / Signals, Reference Signals) concatenation, retransmissions Various antenna pilot patterns and Reference Signals for  RLC modes: Transparent, Unacknowledged, Acknowledged MIMO  Example LTE data flow and transport block sizes MIMO processing in 3GPP-LTE Release 8 Placement of control channels (PCFICH, PHICH, PDCCH) in Radio Interface Procedures the control region  Downlink resource assignment, resource allocation types, Downlink processing chain including channel coding and rate resource block grouping matching, modulation, layer mapping, pre-coding, resource  Modulation and transport block size determination element mapping and OFDMA signal generation  Synchronization and system info acquisition Downlink control information, PDCCH formats, mapping of  RRC measurement reporting DCI into PDCCH  UE mobility states PDCCH blind decoding  Measurements: RSRP, RSSI, RSRQ PHICH assignment  Overview of E-UTRA reporting events  Cell selection / reselectionLTE Uplink PHY Layer Processing  Random Access procedure Uplink channel architecture (radio bearers, logical, transport  MIMO feedback reporting (PMI and RI) and physical channels)  CQI, PHR and BSR reporting Uplink FDD frame structure and its elements (sub-frames,  Uplink power control, open loop and closed loop, types of slots, resource elements, physical resource blocks, PHY transmit power commands channels and signal)  Downlink power control - operation and parameters PHY channels and signals including PUCCH, PUSCH, SRS,  X2 interference management and load balancing procedures DRS, PRACH PUCCH formats LTE Air Interface Demo and Experiments (tool-based) Creation of SRS  OFDMA and SC-FDMA waveforms Random Access Preamble formats  Chosen eNB and UE signals and PHY channels shown in the Location of PRACH in the uplink frame time and frequency domain  Complete downlink and uplink radio frame shown as time- frequency gridNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  8. 8. Introduction to EPS  MAC level identities mapping Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for LTE LTE bandwidths, bit rates and UE categories LTE PHY Layer  Logical, Transport and Physical channels and their relation toEPS Network Architecture the radio interface protocol stack (i.e. Channel architecture) E-UTRA and Evolved Packet Core network architecture  Adaptive Modulation and Coding, QPSK, 16-QAM, 64-QAM Nodes: UE, eNB, SGW, MME, PGW, PCRF  Principles of OFDM/OFDMA/SCFDMA Interfaces: Uu, X2, S1, S11, S5, Gx, S6a, SGi, Rx  Principles of MIMO Overview of EPS protocols: PDCP, RRC, GTP, X2AP, S1-AP,  Downlink and uplink frame structure and its elements (PRB, S1-MME, GTP, Diameter RE, CCE) IP connectivity, user plane and control plane  L1 control information, formats and signaling Access Stratum signaling and Non-Access Stratum signaling  Resource mapping to radio frame E-UTRAN protocol stack and channel architecture  PHY layer related scheduling principles (including ”maximum E-UTRAN L3 and L2 protocols: RRC, PDCP, RLC, MAC, PHY SNIR”, ”round robin” and ”proportional fair” schedulers)Non-Access Stratum (NAS) Protocols S1 Interface Procedures NAS protocols (EMM and ESM)  S1 CP and UP protocol stacks UE states and state transitions (LTE-idle, LTE-active, LTE-  S1 Application Protocol (S1-AP) detached)  S1-AP identifiers Subscriber identities and their relations (IMEI, IMSI, GUTI,  S1-AP procedures: S1 association and SON related STMSI, RNTIs) procedures, UE related procedures Security and keys derivation  GTP-U protocol (including tunneling concept and TEID) Integrity and Encryption - SNOW 3G, AES EPS Authentication and Key Agreement; Key Hierarchy X2 Interface Procedures Key distribution and mobility  X2 CP and UP protocol stacks NAS message structure  X2 Application Protocol (X2-AP)  X2-AP identifiersRadio Resource Control (RRC) Protocol  X2-AP procedures: X2 association procedures, UE related RRC procedures including system info broadcasting, paging, procedures, SON related procedures RRC connection establishment, security establishment, NAS message transport and RRC connection reconfiguration S11, S5/S8, S10 Interface Procedures Types of radio bearers  CP and UP protocol stacks for each interface RRC States & State Transitions  GTP-C (eGTP) protocolPacket Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP)  GTP-C message header and tunneling concept PDCP architecture  Functions and procedures related to each interface (UE PDCP Functions (robust header compression, ARQ at context exchange, call establishment, bearer management, handover, status reporting ciphering and integrity protection) etc.) PDCP message structure for Data and Control IMS and End-to-End SignalingRadio Link Control (RLC) Protocol  IMS architecture (S-CSCF, P-CSCF, I-CSCF, HSS, AS, etc.) RLC architecture (Transparent Mode, Unacknowledged Mode,  IMS security and PCC considerations Acknowledged Mode)  SIP Basics - registration, session establishment Functions (segmentation / concatenation, ARQ procedures)  IMS end-to-end protocol stack RLC PDU formats (RLC user plane and control PDUs)  IMS end-to-end call establishment  Voice in LTE (CS Fallback, Voice Call Continuity, VoLGA)MAC Protocol MAC Architecture Interworking with 3GPP and non-3GPP networks MAC PDU: user plane and control plane parts  Roaming Scheduling procedures for downlink and uplink resource  Inter-working with 3GPP and non-3GPP networks assignments  Inter-RAT handover: example of handover between LTE and Scheduling Requests, Buffer Status Reports and Power UMTS Headroom Reports Hybrid-ARQ processes and HARQ operation Mapping of Logical Channels to Transport ChannelsNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  9. 9. Introduction to EPS IMS Procedures and Services Evolution steps of the 3GPP systems, the goals for LTE/SAE  Service Control and the IMS Current status of the EPS standardization process  Charging Requirements and Functionality (AAA charging example)EPS Network Architecture  IMS discovery IP in the Core Network  SIP signaling procedures – registration, invitation, security Nodes and their roles: UE, eNB, SGW, MME, PGW, PCRF,  End-to-end call establishment via IMS HSS  Services: SMS, Voice (CS Fallback, Voice Call Continuity, Interfaces: Uu, X2, S1, S11, S5, Gx, S6a, SGi, Rx VoLGA) Overview of EPC protocols: GTP, X2AP, S1-AP, S1-MME, GTP, Diameter Security in EPS and IMS IP connectivity, user plane and control plane  Security architecture (key hierarchy) and keys derivation Access Stratum signaling and Non-Access Stratum signaling  Integrity and encryption - SNOW 3G, AES  Key distribution and mobility aspectsEvolved Packet Core Protocols  EPS authentication (AAA procedures) NAS protocols (EMM and ESM)  User-to-Network security mechanisms EMM, ECM and RRC states and state transitions  Network domain security mechanisms (IPsec in EPS and IMS Subscriber identities and their relations (IMEI, IMSI, GUTI, with ESP and IKE) S-TMSI, RNTIs)  The IMS security architecture Control plane EPC protocols: S1-AP and GTP-C over SCTP  Diameter protocol, commands, applications and Attribute User plane EPC protocols: GTP-U over UDP Value Pairs S1 Application Protocol (S1AP) procedures  Diameter nodes and 3GPP extensions Main GTP procedures in EPS  MME - HSS interface (S6a) and signaling with the use of The GTP version 2 protocol (eGTP) Diameter General message headers  S-CSCF - HSS interface (Cx) and signaling with the use of DiameterEvolved Packet Core Procedures Policy and Charging Control in EPS and IMS Mobility management (Tracking Area Update)  IP Connectivity Access Networks (IP-CANs) relation to PCC MMEs in the Pool (pool area, MME selection and addressing,  IP-CAN bearer establishment procedure load balancing, overload control)  IMS based charging principles (PCC rules and high level PCC Network Attach and Detach operation) Session establishment and control (call establishment  PCC nodes and functions (PCRF, PCEF, AF and SPR) procedure)  QoS handling and authorization (filtering of user data and QoS related procedures (default and dedicated bearer, QoS gating) Parameters, PDN Connectivity Request and EPS Bearer  QoS parameter mapping and management functions Establishment)  User plane handling in the PCEF User data transfer (GTP tunneling concept, tunnel  Charging architecture (including CDR) establishment)  Online, offline and roaming charging Service request procedure (UE- and network-triggered) EPC Interworking with Other NetworksIMS Protocols  Inter-working with 3GPP and non-3GPP networks IMS architecture and nodes (S-CSCF, P-CSCF, I-CSCF, AS,  S3 interface and protocol stack (MME and SGSN) HSS, MRFC, MRFP, etc)  S4 interface and protocol stack (SGW and SGSN) Control plane protocols: SIP and SDP  Example interworking procedures (handover between LTE User plane protocols: RTP and RTCP and UMTS, ISR concept and operation) End-to-end IMS protocol stack  Roaming scenarios (local breakout and home routed access) UICC and ISIM and USIM (Subscriber modules)  Interworking security considerations (example of untrusted Public and private user identities non-3GPP access) IP in the EPS/IMS (IETF Dependence, dynamic UE address  Access Network Discovery and Selection Function (ANDSF) allocation) functionality and operation User profiles (IMS service profile) and filter criteriaNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  10. 10. Introduction to EPS and Interoperability  Combined Routing and Tracking Area Updates Evolution of 3GPP systems (GSM, UMTS, LTE)  Context transfer between MME and SGSN (including Evolution of 3GPP2 systems (IS95, cdma2000, eHRPD) UE capabilities for GERAN, UTRAN and Evolution of IEEE systems (WiFi, Fixed WiMAX, Mobile E-UTRAN) WiMAX)  Paging procedures for PS and CS domain EPS basic interworking architecture for 3GPP, non-  Inter-RAT signaling flows including attach, paging, 3GPP trusted and untrusted access location registration (GPRS / EPS attach, inter-RAT Main LTE interoperability scenarios (network selection, location registration) idle mode mobility, PS and CS handovers) EPS Connected Mode Interworking for Packet3GPP Interworking System Architecture Switched (PS) Domain E-UTRAN and EPC nodes and internal interfaces  PS mobility between E-UTRAN and UTRAN / GERAN GSM and UMTS architectures (pre-Rel. 8 and Rel. 8) (PS handover and NACC) Interfaces between GSM / UMTS and EPS (S3, S4,  QoS control for interoperability within 3GPP systems S12, S6d, etc.)  QoS parameters translation between EPS and UMTS GSM / UMTS / EPS protocol stacks (including “language” (bearer mapping – PDP to EPS bearer) interworking protocols – GTP-C / GTP-U / SCTP)  Policy and charging control for PS interoperability GSM / UMTS / EPS bearers concepts and configuration  Signaling flows of E-UTRAN inter-RAT handover to / UE identities within GSM / UMTS and EPS from UTRAN / GERAN and comparison to intra-LTE TIN concept – mapping between GUTI/S-TMSI and handover RAI/P-TMSI  LTE roaming issues (home routed and local breakout) Security interoperability aspects (ciphering / integrity protection keys conversion and authentication vectors EPS Connected Mode Interworking for Circuit transfer) Switched (CS) Domain  Plain CS voice, SMS services and challenges resultingRadio Interface Related Interoperability Issues from PS/CS domain transfer System information for interworking control (cell  IMS role in the interoperability between PS and CS selection / reselection parameters for E-UTRAN, (including IMS architecture and SIP signaling) GERAN, UTRAN, cdma2000, etc.)  CS voice solutions in EPS and IMS networks (CS UE measurements for cell selection / reselection (cell fallback, SR-VCC) search procedures for GERAN, UTRAN, E-UTRAN)  SMS solutions in EPS and IMS (CS fallback, SMS-over- Cell selection / reselection algorithm for Inter-RAT IP) (inter-RAT priority based cell reselection)  GSMA solutions for CS services: voice and SMS over UE measurements and reporting for intra LTE and LTE (VoLTE) inter-RAT handover (periodic and event-triggered)  Signaling flows for CS voice mobility between EPS and Measurement gaps configuration for inter-RAT GSM / UMTS (e.g. CSFB call setup) measurements Handover related RRC signaling (RRC connection LTE Interworking with non-3GPP Networks reconfiguration, Mobility from E-UTRA command)  Interfaces for interoperability between E-UTRAN and RRC States (E-UTRAN and Inter-RAT RRC state eHRPD, WiMAX and WiFi machines and state changes)  Mobility between E-UTRAN and eHRPD (a.k.a. 1xEV- DO)EPS Idle Mode Interworking  Mobility between E-UTRAN and Mobile WiMAX PLMN selection  Interworking with untrusted WiFi access UE location – Location Areas (GERAN), Routing Areas  Security issues for interworking with non-3GPP trusted (UTRAN), Tracking Areas (E-UTRAN) and untrusted networks Idle-mode signaling reduction (ISR) and combined  The use of Access Network Discovery and Selection attach Function (ANDSF)Note: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  11. 11. Radio Propagation Overview and Antenna  Classification of multiple-user scenarios for MIMO usage Fundamentals  3-dimensional scheduling in LTE system Propagation in dispersive multipath channels  Coordinated MIMO transmission from more than one Basic antenna characteristics (time, frequency and base station angular spread) Vertical, horizontal and circular polarization of Combination of MIMO with OFDMA and SC-FDMA electromagnetic wave  OFDMA and SC-FDMA as the key transmission techniques Basic antenna structures (isotropic and dipole), their in the LTE specs characteristics and parameters  MIMO-related synchronization and channel estimation Sector antenna pattern, influence of down-tilting aspects Line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight propagation  Combination of STBC and OFDMA  Combination of SM/BF and OFDMASpatial Diversity Methods  Possible allocations of transmit diversity and spatial Three domains for providing diversity (time, frequency multiplexing and space)  Receive beamforming with SC-FDMA Diversity combining schemes: MRC for receive diversity, Alamouti for transmit diversity and selection combining E-UTRA Release 8 MIMO Processing for both  Downlink and uplink scenarios for Rel. 8 MIMO Combination of spatial diversity (RAKE receiver and cyclic  Pilot patterns for 1, 2 and 4 antenna ports at the eNB delay diversity)  Signal processing chain for MIMO including eNB Use of space time coding (STBC, STTC) transmitter and UE receiver  MIMO mapping including transport blocks, codewordsBeamforming and layers Fundamentals of creating adaptive antenna patterns  MIMO operation for SFBC, spatial multiplexing and Transmit and receive beamforming (DoD and DoA) beamforming Physical vs. mathematical beamforming  MIMO modes and feedback (PMI, RI) Switched multibeam vs. adaptive antenna array Optimal usage of beamforming (desired signal E-UTRA Release 10 and Beyond MIMO enforcement, interference suppression or cancellation) Enhancements Combination of beamforming with spatial diversity or  8x8 spatial multiplexing in downlink and new reference spatial multiplexing signals Practical examples of range increase  4x4 spatial multiplexing in uplink  SU-MIMO for PUSCH and transmit diversity for PUCCHSpatial Multiplexing  Coordinated multipoint transmission in downlink Basic idea of creating independent spatial channels  Coordinated multipoint reception in uplink General mathematical model for spatially multiplexed channels LTE MIMO in Network Deployment Encoder and decoder for Horizontal Layered Space (H-  Antenna system elements and site configurations BLAST)  Practical realization of MIMO configurations Encoder and decoder for Vertical Layered Space (V-  MIMO impact on coverage, capacity, reliability and BLAST) interference Encoder and decoder for Diagonal Layered Space (D-  Influence on link budgets and capacity budgets BLAST)  Typical design trade-offs in application of MIMO Spatial multiplexing with feedback (closed loop) Water-filling concept in closed loop MIMO Numerical Experiments (tool-based) Zero-forcing receiver and singular value decomposition  MIMO processing at eNB transmitter (including SISO, TX (SVD) Diversity, Spatial Multiplexing)  MIMO related reference signalsMIMO in Multiple-user Scenario  Channel correlation influence on spatial stream Extension of spatial multiplexing concept to multiple-user separation scenariosNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  12. 12. Introduction to LTE Advanced  Idle and Connected mode issues (System info acquisition Evolution path of 3GPP LTE systems (standardization time and RRC signaling for CA usage, RRC idle-to-connected state plan in 3GPP) change and HO timing requirements) Features of LTE releases  CA challenges (scheduling and Handover aspects) Requirements and performance targets of LTE Advanced and  MAC issues with relation to CA: user data allocation and its relation to requirements of IMT Advanced for 4G systems signaling aspects (including cross carrier scheduling) Identified IMT-Advanced spectrum allocations  Additional L1 signaling formats (PUCCH format 3 and DCI Release 8 and 9 air interface features format 4) Summary of LTE-Advanced enhancements on the radio interface E-UTRA Rel. 10 Relays LTE Bands, bandwidths, throughputs and UE categories  Relay concept and roles for capacity and coverage Possible services for LTE-Advanced (e.g. positioning, internet enhancements of things, MBMS, broadband access, etc.)  Types of relays (Repeaters and Relay Nodes)  L3-Relay Node (RN) in LTE-Advanced specifications (protocolEPS Network Architecture Improvements stacks, architecture and roles of DeNB) Release 8 nodes and interfaces (UE, eNB, MME, SGW, PGW)  RN procedures (activation and relaying operation) Release 9 scenarios (MBMS, Positioning)  L1 issues (R-PDCCH & MBSFN sub-frame usage for relay Release 10 enhancements in EPS (added Relays and link) enhanced Home eNodeB)  Timing requirements for relay linkE-UTRA Rel. 9 Features E-UTRA Rel. 10 Home eNBs, HetNets and SON Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Service (MBMS)  LTE HeNB architecture possibilities (HeNB, HeNB GW and MBMS architecture and PHY issues SeGW) Self-organizing and self-optimizing networks (SON)  Access control and CSG management (types of cells: open, SON architecture and functionalities hybrid and closed) LTE Positioning concept, architecture and possible location  Heterogeneous Network (HetNet) concept (Macro, Pico, services Femto cells and relays)  Interference scenariosE-UTRA Rel. 10 PHY Enhancements  LTE inter cell interference coordination (ICIC) in time and Multicarrier transmission (OFDM/OFDMA/SCFDMA) frequency Refreshment of the Rel. 8 E-UTRA (including protocol stacks, downlink and uplink radio frames, PHY channels and signals) E-UTRA Release 11 and Beyond Features Clustered SCFDMA for uplink in Rel. 10  Cooperative Multipoint Transmission/Reception Bandwidth extension by carrier aggregation (use of  CoMP downlink and uplink scenarios component carriers)  Mobile Type Communications (MTC) concept and possible Processing of Component carriers services Various scenarios of carrier aggregation  Mobile Relays concept RF aspects related to carrier aggregation Enhanced Downlink MIMO (for up to 8 antennas) LTE Advanced Deployment Additional Downlink MIMO reference symbols for higher  Backward compatibility to LTE Rel. 8 requirements order MIMO (CSI-RS, DM-RS)  Transparency of Relay nodes (and RNs deployment issues) Processing chain for DL MIMO (and comparison to Rel. 8  Migration from LTE Rel. 8 to LTE Advanced Rel. 10 processing chain)  HetNet deployment New UL MIMO schemes (SU-MIMO for PUSCH and TX Diversity for PUCCH) LTE Advanced Demo and Experiments (tool-based) Processing chain for UL MIMO (and comparison to Rel. 8  Usage of 8 antennas in the downlink for spatial multiplexing processing chain)  Spatial multiplexing in the uplink  Bandwidth aggregationE-UTRA Rel. 10 Protocols and Procedures Protocol stack for Carrier Aggregation CA procedures (addition and release, activation and deactivation of component carrier) Primary and Secondary Component Carriers for Downlink OFDMA and Uplink SCFDMANote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  13. 13. LTE RF Design Process  Site sharing options RF Planning workflow  Improving coverage with the use of repeaters Inputs to and targets for the planning process; expected  LTE downlink and uplink link budget exercises outputs  Planning tool configuration and simulations Coverage and capacity requirements Planning constraints Frequency Reuse and Interference Management Significant differences in planning for GSM and UMTS (tool-based)  Interference avoidance, cancellation and coordinationEPS Overview and E-UTRAN Consideration (tool-  Considerations for Single Frequency Network (SFN) based)  Frequency-parallel schemes (OFDMA, SC-FDMA) in SFN Evolved Packet System architecture  Classical frequency reuse concept (integer reuse) E-UTRAN architecture: nodes and interfaces  Fractional frequency reuse (FFR) methods including soft eNB and UE architecture reuse and partial reuse Radio frame for E-UTRA FDD and TDD  Comparison of FDD and TDD co-channel interference Reference signals and pilots: RS, P-SS, S-SS, DRS, SRS scenarios PHY channels in the downlink: PBCH, PDCCH, PCFICH,  Role of X2 interface between eNBs in coordination of PHICH, PDSCH interference and load balancing PHY channels in the uplink: PRACH, PUCCH, PUSCH  Frequency planning performance evaluations and Link-level radio interface simulations simulationsRadio Propagation Principles (tool-based) LTE Capacity Planning (tool-based) Spectrum considerations and LTE frequency bands  EPS bearers and QoS concept RF requirements imposed on UE and eNB transceivers  Traffic types and device types Large-scale and small-scale propagation effects; path-  Capacity planning with MIMO loss, shadowing and fading  Influence of Modulation and Coding Scheme distribution Propagation models: statistical, empirical and on sector capacity deterministic  Overview of backhaul network options and requirements Configuration and tuning of the propagation model  Exercises in capacity calculationsAntenna Considerations and MIMO RAN Procedures Configuration Antenna properties – size, gain, beam-width, polarization,  Self-Organizing Network (SON) front-to-back ratio  Synchronization signals distribution (PHY cell ID planning) LTE diversity techniques  Random access preamble allocation and dimensioning of Spatial multiplexing, single-user and multi-user MIMO PRACH opportunities Transmission modes and MIMO feedback signaling  Cell reselection and handover parameters Impact on LTE link budget and capacity  Uplink and downlink transmit power control Antenna system sharing options  Feedback reporting configuration (CQI, PMI, RI)Coverage Planning and Link Budgets (tool-based) LTE Inter-working with 2G, 3G Link budgets, gains and losses  Roaming Role of adaptive modulation and coding scheme  Inter-working with 3GPP and non-3GPP networks Requirements for signal-to-noise-and-interference ratio (SNIR) and receiver sensitivity Thermal noise calculations and interference estimation Maximum allowed path loss Impact of normal and extended cyclic prefix Impact of antenna configuration Range determination and site-to-site distance estimation Signal level and best server coverage plots SNIR and spectrum efficiency coverage plots Key measurements: RSSI, RSRP and RSRQNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.
  14. 14. LTE and SON Introduction  3GPP support for self-optimization (X2 interface, Features of LTE Releases and main radio procedures and messages, UE reports for self- parameters optimization) LTE / LTE-Advanced network architecture (UE,  Self-optimization for HetNets (interference eNB, HeNB, RN, MME, S-GW, P-GW, HSS, etc.) management, macro-network traffic offload, SON concept range expansion, etc.) SON history and features evolution over 3GPP Rel. 8, 9 and 10 LTE Self-Healing SON architecture types (centralized, distributed  Automatic network failure detection, diagnostics and hybrid) and recovering Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) in the  Cell degradation detection and improvement context of SON  Cell outage compensation / mitigationSON Frameworks in NGMN, 3GPP and SON in Evolved Packet CoreResearch Projects  ANR and S1-flex (MME Pools) in the context of NGMN SON use cases – self- EPC optimization planning/configuration, self-deployment and fault  Signaling and latency optimization management  Voice network monitoring and resource 3GPP SON use cases – self-configuration, self- optimization optimization and self-healing 3GPP Management Reference Model (NM, DM, 3GPP Multi-RAT SON EM)  Self-planning issues for 2G (GSM) / 3G (UMTS) / SON versus RRM (large and small scale resource LTE management)  SON 2G - frequency planning, SON 3G – SON research projects (e.g. SOCRATES) scrambling codes planning, SON LTE – PCI planningLTE Self-Configuration (Plug & Play)  Cross-technology self-planning (spectrum Auto-connectivity (including X2 and S1 setup) management, antenna settings optimization, Automated configuration of Physical Cell Identity neighbor list management) (PCI) – confusion and collision free  Future of SON – Cognitive Radio Networks (SON Automatic Neighbor Relation function (ANR) to CRN evolution) Self-configuration for HetNets (ANR, auto- connectivity) Relay Node auto-connectivityLTE Self-Optimization Coverage and Capacity Optimization (CCO) Mobility Load Balancing (MLB) Mobility Robustness Optimization (MRO) RACH optimization Energy saving management Inter-cell interference coordination (ICIC) Minimization of Drive Tests (MTD) Coordination of SON functionsNote: the course content is subject to minor changes and adaptations to the customer needs.

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