0
Enhancing community
connections for older people
18/03/2014
www.iriss.org.uk
Vivien.moffat@iriss.org.uk
2
Loneliness and
social isolation
3
Life changes
4
10% of over 65s are
lonely
Victor C (2011) Loneliness in old age: the UK perspective. Safeguarding the
convoy: a call to...
5
50% of over 80s are
lonely
Age UK (2010) Loneliness and isolation evidence review, London: Age UK
6
Poor health and
wellbeing
7
15 Cigarettes a day?
15 Cigarettes a day?
8
Prevention
9
Who?
Shaping the Future
Choreography of Care of
Older People
everyon
e
11
Building strong
communities
www.iriss.org.uk
Plan P: New approaches to
prevention of loneliness and
social isolation for older people
Find out more
• Iriss Insight -
http://www.iriss.org.uk/resources/preventing-loneliness-
• Plan P blog: http://blogs.iriss...
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Enhancing community connections for older people (S2)

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Session that highlights key principles for health and social care practice that have been shown to enhance older people’s independence and social connectedness. People with more social connections are likely to experience better health and wellbeing and to remain independent for longer. A key aspect of prevention for older people is, therefore, enhancing community connections. Contributed by: IRISS and Irene Weeden, Development Officer for Moray Council.

Published in: Healthcare, Health & Medicine
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  • I am VM etc
    Joined by Irene Weeden etc
    This session is about enhancing community connections for older people
    I am going to start by telling you about some of the work we’ve been doing at IRISS around preventing social isolation and loneliness in older people
    And then I’ll hand over to Irene who will describe some of her work with older people in Moray
    Then we will have the opportunity for some discussion, for you to share your own experience. We hope that we will all be able to learn from each other and leave this session with some new ideas.
    So, enhancing community connections why do we want to do this – one of the reasons to to address…
  • What are the issues around loneliness and social isolation for older people
    This is a common problem
    There are lots of reasons why…
  • Older people may be widowed after many years of partnership, may lose sight or hearing or physical ability to get out in the community, may become a carer and not be able to leave the cared for person, may find themselves moved to a care home away from their own community, may lose confidence, may develop dementia, for BME groups may begin to lose english language
  • There are strong links with poorer physical and mental health and well being for people who are lonely and isolated.
    Associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, stress, poor sleep, depression – increased mortality
    This may be linked to increased levels of alcohol or tobacco use, poor eating habits, lack of exercise
    Although infact loneliness and social isolation has a greater effect on mortality than any of these behaviours
  • Or image of a cigarette or of people smoking
    The detrimental effects of loneliness and social isolation have been compared with the smoking 15 cigarettes a day.
    As well as being not what we want for our society, our own families or for ourselves, it also represents a cost in terms of increased health care needs and admission to hospital or residential care.
    So what are going to do about it?
  • What does prevention mean on this context?
    The traditional approach has been to wait until things go horribly wrong and then call in services and support try and put it right
    Prevention in this context means looking at building resilience so that people are less likely to become lonely and isolated in the first place
  • Who needs to be involved –not just services any more - the community and older people themselves are a significant part of the solution – asset based approach
    People must work together – co-production
  • Raising awareness – building strong and resilient and connected communities
    Universal prevention
    Our review of evidence suggests that flexible support based within the community and involving older people, particularly in group activities is most effective
    Which brings us back to enhancing community connections
  • Iriss project in partnership running over 2.5 years
    Aims to improve understanding about what prevention means
    Try out new ideas
    Build on evidence
    Involve everyone
    Make a difference
  • Transcript of "Enhancing community connections for older people (S2)"

    1. 1. Enhancing community connections for older people 18/03/2014 www.iriss.org.uk Vivien.moffat@iriss.org.uk
    2. 2. 2 Loneliness and social isolation
    3. 3. 3 Life changes
    4. 4. 4 10% of over 65s are lonely Victor C (2011) Loneliness in old age: the UK perspective. Safeguarding the convoy: a call to action from the Campaign to End Loneliness, Oxfordshire:Age UK
    5. 5. 5 50% of over 80s are lonely Age UK (2010) Loneliness and isolation evidence review, London: Age UK
    6. 6. 6 Poor health and wellbeing
    7. 7. 7 15 Cigarettes a day? 15 Cigarettes a day?
    8. 8. 8 Prevention
    9. 9. 9 Who?
    10. 10. Shaping the Future Choreography of Care of Older People everyon e
    11. 11. 11 Building strong communities
    12. 12. www.iriss.org.uk Plan P: New approaches to prevention of loneliness and social isolation for older people
    13. 13. Find out more • Iriss Insight - http://www.iriss.org.uk/resources/preventing-loneliness- • Plan P blog: http://blogs.iriss.org.uk/planp/ • IRISS FM episode - What does prevention mean in an ageing population: http://irissfm.iriss.org.uk/episode/068 www.iriss.org.uk
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