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Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension
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Case Study:Field Proven Innovations for Impact Protection and Life Extension

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Franck Legerstee, Regional Offshore Project Manager, SEA Bureau Veritas gives his view on the field proven innovations for impact protection and life extension.

Franck Legerstee, Regional Offshore Project Manager, SEA Bureau Veritas gives his view on the field proven innovations for impact protection and life extension.

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  • 1. Health, Safety and Environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals Singapore 28-29 September 2010 F. LEGERSTEE Project Manager Offshore Rules Development franck.legerstee@bureauveritas.com
  • 2. AGENDA► Introduction► Identification of main hazards Comparison with classic FPSO► Tools and methodology Risk analysis Regulations► A few word on Regulation, statutory requirements and norms► Conclusions Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 2
  • 3. Introduction
  • 4. BV active involvement in the LNG Industry BV services are provided throughout the LNG Chain Onshore Gas treatment RegasificationRaw Storagegas Liquefaction Sea transport Salesentry LNG LNG gas LPG/Ethane Condensate Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 4
  • 5. Main Idea Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 5
  • 6. Identification of main Hazards
  • 7. FLNG main Hazards► Health Hazardous products from the production or the process Cryogenic► Safety: Fire Explosion Cryogenic► Environment Release of gas (methane, propane, etc…) Release of liquid (condensate) Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 7
  • 8. Hazard Events Rupture of tanks, Leak during Impact pressure vessel, offloading piping, valves, etc… Loss of containment Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 8
  • 9. Hazard Identification Loss of containment Cryogenic Release Gas Release Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 9
  • 10. Hazard Identification Loss of containment Cryogenic Release Gas Release Steel rupture RPT explosion Evaporating to gas Potential Escalation Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 10
  • 11. Hazard Identification Loss of containment Cryogenic Release Gas Release Dispersion Fire Explosion (depending of gas density) (with ignition (with ignition source) source) Potential Escalation Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 11
  • 12. Feedback from LNG industry► 40 years of LNG transportation by sea With regular trading routes Worldwide involvement • Europe – Africa • Asia Pacific► No major accident► A few LNG incident, mainly in the the 1st years (1970’s) Most of incidents happened at harbour, during loading / offloading At sea most of the incident lead to gas dispersion, without fire or explosion. But sometimes with high damage on steel structure due to cryogenic temperature Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 12
  • 13. Rapid Phase Transfer► In case of LNG leakage to sea LNG leakage in water in a process system (vaporizer)► Quick vaporisation of LNG to gas, leading to physical explosion► Air and underwater blast RPT spillage of 9m3 of LNG at Sea (1984) (Courtesy of GdfSuez) ► Phenomena studied in the past by gas companies but still difficult to model ► Concern for offloading system Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 13
  • 14. LNG dispersion► LNG is a liquid: driven by gravity► LNG will vaporise immediately and “slowly” (except for RPT)► Vaporised gas will ignite only if quantity of methane and oxygen are matching Too rich in methane: no ignition Too poor in methane: no explosion► Vaporised gas is lighter than air, and will go downwind► Dispersion analysis to be done to define Safety area at sea level Safety area at helicopter level Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 14
  • 15. Environmental Aspect
  • 16. Installations phase► Selection of the location Close to shore: Far from shore • in someone backyard • Expensive subsea systems • Shallow water is where most of • LNG transfer offshore marine life are • Evacuation in offshore condition • High impact in case of accident ► Installation activities Disturbance of sea bed, water turbidity • Long term consequences on marine organism Emission from installation boats (to air and to sea) • Short term local consequences on marine life Traffic disruptions (Commercial of leisure boat) • Short term local consequences on human activites Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 16
  • 17. Operations phase► Sea pollution Oil leakage (from process and machinery) Heavy metal from coating Sewage water Hull disposal to sea • Temperature of cooling water (or warming water in case of vaporizer) • Produced water • Ballast water from export LNG carriers Long term consequence to the environment: Disease/disappearance of some species Development of new species Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 17
  • 18. Operations phase► Air pollution Combustion engines • Oil fired for boilers, diesel engines, etc.. But CH4 emits less CO2 and heavy particles than • Gas fired for boilers, gas turbines other hydrocarbon fuel Venting • Methane is stronger greenhouse gas than CO2 Long term consequence to the environment Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 18
  • 19. Operations Phase► Management of other field products For LNG FPSO, critical production by-products may have to be managed: • Heavier hydrocarbons • Mercury • H2S • Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials • Etc…► Management of process products Methanol, glycol, etc… In case of leakage, consequences may impair locally environment and health Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 19
  • 20. Operations phase► Traffic disruption Asset Safety Area Continuous movement of boat (tug, supply, workboat, etc…) Shuttle LNG carriers operations (huge vessels) Subsea systems: Fishing and anchoring limitations► Impairment of visual environment During operation impacts on public resentment During operation on commercial traffic Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 20
  • 21. Decommissioning► Similar effect to installations: Disturbance of sea bed, water turbidity • Long term consequences on marine organism Emission from installation boats (to air and to sea) • Short term local consequences on marine life Traffic disruptions (Commercial of leisure boat) • Short term local consequences on human activites► Dismantling of the hull and process Toxic materials Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 21
  • 22. Regulation, statutory requirements and norms
  • 23. Applicable RulesRules that are applicable : - Coastal State Regulations - Flag State Regulations - Class Rules - IMO (International Maritime Organisation) Conventions Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 23
  • 24. Applicable Rules Coastal State Regulations FPSO-LNG must comply with coastal state regulations in the territorial seas it is operating (from the boundary of a State’s internal waters to twelve miles from its baselines) The Coastal State also possess some rights in the EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone) which consists of a 200 mile- broad strip between the Coast and the High Seas Coastal States may require FPSO-LNG to be flagged and classed. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 24
  • 25. Applicable Rules Flag State Regulations Ships and Mobile Offshore Units trading internationally are to comply with safety regulations of the Maritime Authority in the country whose Flag the unit is flying (the Flag State) Flag States adopt and implement the safety regulations given in conventions issued by IMO An owner has normally the choice to select the flag Production/storage units do not need to carry a flag (except when required by Coastal State) but are free to move in international waters when carrying a flag Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 25
  • 26. Applicable Rules Relations between Coastal State, Flag and Class Flag State requires classification Delegation of authority from Flag State to Class is a common practice For operation in territorial waters there are additional local regulations Delegation of authority from Coastal State to Class is rare Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 26
  • 27. IMO International Maritime Organisation (IMO) United Nations body for maritime affairs From its earliest days, the IMO’s most important objectives have been the improvement of maritime safety and the prevention of marine pollution It is responsible for developing new regulations and procedures for the shipping industry, or revising existing ones. Most of these will subsequently be incorporated in national legislation. At present the IMO consists of 162 Member States, often referred to as Flag States Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 27
  • 28. IMOThe main IMO documents that could be applicable to LNG-FPSOs are: - SOLAS 1974 - IGC Code - MARPOL 73/78 - MODU Code - Load Line Convention 66 - COLREG 1972 - Tonnage 1969The degree to which an IMO regulation is enforced depends on the FlagState : it is important to check Flag Authority’s position early in a project Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 28
  • 29. IMO SOLAS (International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea)The main objective of the SOLAS Convention is to specify minimum standards forthe construction, equipment and operation of ships, compatible with their safety.Flag States ratifying the Convention are responsible for ensuring that ships undertheir flag comply with its requirements, and a number of certificates are prescribedin the Convention as proof that this has been done.SOLAS scope includes the construction, the safety equipment, the life savingappliances and the radio communications Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 29
  • 30. IMOCOLREG (Convention on the International regulations for preventingof collision at sea)The Convention defines the arrangement regarding steering and sailing rules, lightsand shapes, sounds and light signals to be provided onboard the unit in order toprevent collision.Technical requirements concerning lights and shapes and their positioning, soundsignalling appliances and international distress signals are included in theConvention. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 30
  • 31. IMOMARPOL (International Convention for the Prevention of Pollutionfrom Ships)The MARPOL Convention covers most if not all the technical aspects of pollutionfrom ships, and applies to ships of all types.The Convention has six annexes which contain regulations for the prevention ofvarious forms of pollution. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 31
  • 32. IMOLOAD LINES 66Early naval architects and shipbuilders recognized long ago that, by limiting thedraft to which a ship may be loaded, they could make a significant contribution tothe safety of that ship. Such a limit or “freeboard” relates to the stability and thestructural strength of the hull, the reserve buoyancy, and amount of waterreaching the weather deck; hence to the degree of water tightness required tostop it entering the hull. These are the main objectives of the LOAD LINESConvention.All assigned load lines must be marked amidships on each side of the ship,together with the deck line as follows: Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 32
  • 33. IMOIGC CODE (International Code for the construction and equipment ofships carrying liquefied gas in bulks)The Code covers the following areas: ship survival capability & location of cargotanks, ship arrangements, cargo containment, piping systems, materials ofconstruction, cargo pressure / temperature control, cargo tank vent systems,environmental control, electrical installations, fire protection & fire extinction,mech. ventilation in cargo area, instrumentation (gauging, gas detection),personnel protection, filling limits for cargo tank, use of cargo as fuel, operatingrequirements. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 33
  • 34. IMOMODU (Code for the Construction and Equipment of Mobile OffshoreDrilling Units)IMO MODU Code specifies safety technical requirements applicable to offshoredrilling units in addition to SOLAS general requirements.This Code has been developed to provide an international standard for mobileoffshore drilling units of new construction which will facilitate the internationalmovement and operation of these units and ensure a level of safety for such units,and for personnel on board, equivalent to that required by SOLAS 1974 and theICLL 1966, for conventional ships engaged on international voyages. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 34
  • 35. Class Societies Origin ► Societies set up by marine insurers ► To meet the need of marine insurers : rating of the ships to covered by hull insurance ► First class societies Lloyd’s Register (1760) Bureau Veritas (1828) American Bureau of Shipping (1862) Det Norske Veritas (1864) Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 35
  • 36. Actors of the marine safety FLAG STATE PORT STATE CLASS SOCIETY SHIPOWNER CHARTERER HULL INSURER Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 36
  • 37. Definition of class ► Classification is the appraisal on the level of compliance of a vessels to the rules set up by the class society ► This appraisal is represented by class notations entered on the certificate and periodically transcribed in the society’s register Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 37
  • 38. The classification Rules ► The Rules published by the society give the requirements for the assignment and maintenance of classification for seagoing ships ► Aim = to protect a ship as a piece of property ► Various types of rules Steel ships Offshore units Inland navigation vessels Submarine craft Yachts High speed craft Navy ships Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 38
  • 39. Field of the classification RulesCOVERED BY CLASS NOT COVERED BY CLASS► Materials ► Mode of propulsion► Structural strength ► Power of propulsion unit► Main & auxiliary machinery ► Manning► Electrical installations ► Comfort on board► Cargo installations ► Requirements for ‘user friendliness’► Fire protection ► Requirements for maintenance friendliness► Stability Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 39
  • 40. THE CLASSIFICATION PROCESS► Approval of drawings► Inspection of materials► Survey of the hull and the control equipment► Issuance of class certificates► Once in service, periodical, occasional and class renewal surveys Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 40
  • 41. THE DESIGN CHECKING PROCESS► At the preliminary stage, subdivisions and preliminary stability booklet may be checked► Second, scantlings are checked for local elements and the primary structure► The final phase consists of an analysis of structural details, machinery diagrams and outfit falling within the scope of classification Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 41
  • 42. NEW CONSTRUCTION Shipyard LPO center ManufacturerClass Certification Office Equipment manufacturer CLASS RULES Shipyard Ship-owner ClassClass Plan Approval Office Surveillance at yard Office Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 42
  • 43. CLASSIFICATION INTERVENTION : SHIPS IN SERVICE► During their live, ships are submitted to regular surveys for the maintenance of class in accordance with IACS Unified Requirements► Within a cycle of 5 years there are : Annual survey Intermediate survey Renewal survey► In addition occasional surveys► Enhanced Survey Programme for bulk carriers and tankers Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 43
  • 44. DEFINITION OF CLASS Selective surveys 1 WHAT IS CLASS Selective “Risk Based Inspection” with Focus on ”Critical Areas”► XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX Qualification of surveyors XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX • XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX • XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX • XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX • XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXO Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 44
  • 45. IACSOn the 11th September 1968: the International Association of Classificationwas createdThe IACS is composed of 10 members: - American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) - Bureau Veritas (BV) - China Classification Society (CCS) - Det Norske Veritas (DNV) - Germanisher Lloyd (GL) - Korean Register of Shipping (KRS) - Lloyd’s Register (LR) - Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NK) - Registro Italiano Navale (RINA) - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (MRS) Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 45
  • 46. Delegation to class► 130 Flag States have delegated their statutory activities to recognised organisations including class► Main delegations : IMO conventions Technical inspections of vessels Issuance of certificates► Delegation for ISM Code regulations Assessment of the Safety Management System (SMS) of the shipping company by audits and reports Periodical verifications Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 46
  • 47. Examples of development followed by Bureau Veritas
  • 48. EN 1474 for offshore LNG► Development of European norm regarding LNG transfer 3 parts to qualify the LNG transfer systems • 1) Rigid arms at quay • 2) Flexible hoses at quay • 3) Additional requirements for offshore use► Norm used by some of the major LNG transfer system FMC for rigid arms Technip for aerial flexible hose SBM for floating flexible hose► BV Rules for offshore gas terminal (NR 542) is making reference to this norm Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 48
  • 49. CONVENAV - CONception et cycle de Vie Environnemental des NAVires► 01/2008 – 09/2010 ANR funded (Pôle Mer Bretagne label) Rejets & Partners: DCNS (leader), BUREAU VERITAS, Émissions Déchets ENSAM, IFREMER, SITA Goals: Cycle de Vie • Develop a method for assessing the environmental impacts of a ship • Develop an eco-design tool for ships Énergies Matières • Develop a ship environmental performance Improvement of monitoring tool New Ship Materials End of Life scenario Design Status: Improvement of Dismantling • Data collection and structuring achieved Techniques Definition of best disposal or recycling routes • Preliminary LCA of a frigate completed How to improve How to avoid these How to avoid these • Definition of specific eco-indicators in these Techniques? problems? problems? progress • Eco-design tool specification in progress Analysis of Environment Environment Coming next: problems in Economy Safety Economy Material End of Life Analysis Dismantling Safety • Complete eco-design and monitoring tools specifications. Dismantling Waste Techniques Dismantling Materials • Development and tests of these tools Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 49
  • 50. GALERNE - Evaporating GAs/Liquids and Risk for life and Environment► 2006-2009 ANR founded (PRECODD) Partners : CEDRE, INERIS, BV, Meteo France, IRSN, Gaz de France, BEA mer, Marine Nationale, TOTAL Goals • Define accident scenarios for early decision making of French coast guards in their first approach • Provide experimental data • Provide quick simulation tools CEDRE pictures Status • BV achieved scenario definition • Small scale experiments in laboratory (Ineris) • Large scale experiments in Brest harbour Coming next • Simulation of toxic/flammable cloud dispersion • Quick intervention sheet Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 50
  • 51. Some details of BV Rule Note 542 for Offshore Gas Units Tospides and Transfer systems
  • 52. NI 542 - Principles Semi-probabilistic approach; generally, PSF based criteria Net scantlings approach Environmental loads with a return period of 100 years Mandatory sloshing study : direct calculation or model tests Prescriptive criteria for hull girder strength and local scantlings FEM 3D models are mandatory for hull and independent tanks assessment Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 52
  • 53. NI 542 - Principles►Approach similar to FPSO Rules; unit’s areas are defined as : “offshore area” “ship area” ► Structural members of offshore areas are categorized as : Special category First category Secondary category Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 53
  • 54. NI542 - Principles Sloshing assessment Hydrodynamic analysis Temperature in the Design loads Cargo containment design condition Load parameters -Independent tanks (A, B, C) -Membrane tanks -Integral tanks Steel grade -Supports and keys selection Hull girder Hull Other 3D FEM Fatigue strength scantlings structures model assessment -Plating -Offshore areas - Primary -Spectral -Ordinary -Local structural supporting fatigue stiffeners improvements members -Deterministic Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 54
  • 55. NI542 - Cargo containment system ► Scantlings of inner hull are to comply with the hull requirements Membrane tanks ► Specific allowable stresses or hull deflections indicated by the Designer are to be taken into account ► Internal pressures to be calculated as for the hull structure, using the hydrodynamic analysis and direct calculation for sloshing ► Specific requirements for scantlings of plates and ordinary stiffeners covering: IMO Type A Minimal gross thickness Independent tanks Subject to lateral pressure Testing condition ► 3D finite element model assessment is mandatory for the primary supporting members Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 55
  • 56. NI542 - Cargo containment system ► Internal pressures to be calculated as for the hull structure, using the hydrodynamic analysis and direct calculation for sloshing ► Scantlings of plating and ordinary stiffeners subjected to lateral pressure ► Buckling assessment (plating and stiffeners) ► 3D FEM model assessment is mandatory for primary supporting members (PSM)IMO Type BIndependent tanks ► Yielding criteria for PSM: ► Tanks primarily constructed of bodies of revolution (ex MOSS) ► Tanks primarily constructed of plane surfaces (ex SPB) ► Buckling criteria for PSM ► Fatigue analysis is to be performed for areas specified by Designer and agreed by BV; the analysis is to comply with the requirements for hull structure ► Crack propagation analysis : reference to Steel Ships Rules for gas carriers, using the loads in offshore environment defined in NI 542 Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 56
  • 57. NI542 - Cargo containment system ► Internal pressures to be calculated as for the hull structure, using the hydrodynamic analysis and direct calculation for sloshing ► Scantlings of pressure vessels class 1 ► Assessment of stiffening rings in way of tank supports; the loads used for this check are those defined in NI 542IMO Type CIndependent tanks Stiffening rings in way of tank supports Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 57
  • 58. NI542 - Cargo containment system ► Supports of independent tanks are to be assessed through FEM calculations ► The following types of supports are covered: Antirolling supportsTank supports Antipiching supports Anticollision supports Antiflotation supports ► Checking criteria are in accordance with IGC Code (BV interpretation) ► Extent of secondary barrier ► InsulationOther itemscovered by NI ► Insulation materials542 ► Material of construction for tanks – reference to IGC Code ► Construction and testing Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 58
  • 59. NR542 – Topside systems► Requirements for the design approval of : • Process systems – class notation “PROC” • Liquefaction plant – class notation “gas liquefaction” • Revaporization plant – class notation “RV” • Transfer systems – class notation “liquefied gas offloading”► Qualification of unproven technology► Principles and typical recommendations relating to topside layout Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 59
  • 60. NR542 – Topside systems ► New technology or existing technology in new environmentUnproven technology ► The qualification is requested before design approval in order to identify criticality levels ► Risk based methodology proposed in the guidance note NI 525 F Annual Frequency Definition 5 SC -4 1 < 10 Extremely improbable: not expected in the system life 2 -4 10 - 10 -3 Improbable: not anticipated in the system life 4 HC -3 -2 F- Factor 3 10 - 10 Extremely remote: should not happen in the system life 4 -2 10 - 10 -1 Remote: expected few times in the system life 3 MC -1 5 > 10 Reasonably probable: expected several times in the system life 2 LC SA Severity Definition 1 Negligible No damage to personnel, safety functions fully available 1 NC 2 Minor Light injuries to personnel and/or local damage to safety functions 3 Severe Serious injuries to personnel and/or large local damages to 1 2 3 4 5 safety functions 4 Critical Fatalities amongst personnel locally, impairment of safety S Factor functions 5 Catastrophic A large number of fatalities amongst personnel also outside the event area, total impairment of safety functions Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 60
  • 61. NR542 – Topside systems ► Common body of requirements in BV Offshore Rules (Part C) : • Pressure vessels • Heat exchangers • Piping systems • Gas turbines • Electrical installationsDesign requirements ► Additional requirements from IGC Code for equipments andConstruction survey components in direct contact with liquefied gas or vapoursTesting ► Additional requirements for process systems (PROC) in BV NR459 ► Other recognized codes and standards for items not covered above: • EN 1473 • NFPA 59A • NFPA 59 Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 61
  • 62. NR542 – Topside systems Topside layout Risk analysis► Safety assessment based on FSA techniques► Structural fire integrity► Fire fighting equipments► Emergency control stations► Life saving appliances► Methodology based on: • API RP 14J • EN ISO 17776 Formal safety assessment process (FSA) Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 62
  • 63. NR542 – Topside systems ► Requirements coherent with API RP 14J, EN ISO 13702, NORSOK S-001, IGC Code ► Safety principles, grouping of equipments, partition into fire zonesTopside layout ► System arrangement, explosion mitigation ► Requirements for accommodations, temporary refuge and means of escape Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 63
  • 64. NR542 – Transfer systems► New additional notation : liquefied gas offloading Covers the classification of transfer systems for liquefied gas► The notation covers transfer arms in : Side-by side configuration Tandem configuration Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 64
  • 65. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Principles : Overall requirements coherent with EN 1474 (1 to 3) Structural requirements coherent with BV Offshore Rules and NR526 (Lifting Appliances) ► Items covered : Materials (with respect to IGC Code) Clearance study, envelope Dimensions of product lines Design loads and structural safety Safety systems and features Type approvals Manufacturing and testing Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 65
  • 66. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Risk assessmentDesign principles ► Clearance study, balancing ► Materials ► Product line dimensions ► Relative motions and accelerations assessed by model test or direct calculations ► Dead load ► Cargo loadDesign Loads ► Design pressure ► Ice accumulation ► Wind loads ► Thermal loads ► Standard stowed and operating conditions: combination of loads ► Criteria for yielding, buckling, fatigue ► Assessment of supporting structure and pedestalStructural safety ► Assessment of product line ► Assessment of swivels ► QCDC body Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 66
  • 67. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Risk assessment study to be submitted for information ► The study has the following objectives: Failure modes identification Evaluation of the design, based on operational procedures Definition of limiting conditions for offloading operations Identification of safety critical elements – selection based on consequence of failure Record of accidental loading conditions related to safety critical elements Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 67
  • 68. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Limiting conditions for offloading operations to be specified by the Owner, in agreement with the risk assessment report ► Minimum parameters : Maximum allowable wave height Limiting metocean conditions (wind, current, ice and snow) Limiting air temperatures Configurations of gas carrier (ex: manifold position) Limiting draughts of the unit Envelopes of the transfer system Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 68
  • 69. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Clearance study is to include : Fabrication and erection tolerances Maximal deflections of the transfer system during operations ► Checkpoints are chosen case-by-case, based on general arrangement Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 69
  • 70. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Design temperatures based on direct calculation, taking into account : Specified cargo temperature Local environmental conditions – air temperature ranges ► Steel grades of supporting structure in compliance with BV Offshore Rules, as for special category elements ► Materials for piping and elements in contact with cargoes in compliance with IGC Code, Ch 6 Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 70
  • 71. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Assessment of combined motion of unit and gas carrier ► Parameters of interest: Relative motions between checkpoints Absolute accelerations at checkpoints ► Checkpoints : On riser or pedestal of transfer arm At gas carrier manifold Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 71
  • 72. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Design wind velocity to be taken at 10 m above sea level, as a 3 seconds gust speed : For stowed conditions – 100 years wind velocity and not less than 51.5 m/s For operating conditions – wind velocity at the probability level of limiting conditions ► Wind force : Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 72
  • 73. NR 542 – Transfer systems ► Structural criteria are defined for the following loading conditions Stowed position Operating conditions Maintenance conditions Hydrostatic test Emergency release conditions Accidental conditions Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 73
  • 74. Bureau Veritas Services for Offshore Gas Terminals Introduction
  • 75. Bureau Veritas Services for FLNG► Classification, Certification, 3rd party verifications Concept or basic approval Review of the project at each progress phases with regards to the local law, international codes and standards► New technologies evaluation and qualification Evaluate the new technologies with regards to their functional requirements Quantify their associated risk Define qualification needs and qualification program► Technical assistance Marine Pipes and offshore structure Process Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 75
  • 76. SELECTED OFFSHORE LNG TERMINALS BV involved in several on-going OFFSHORE LNG projects as follows: ► Australia: Prelude for SHELL Generic LNG FPSO for GDFSUEZ ► Africa: FLSO project for SHELL ► Europe: OLT (Livorno) for SAIPEM and E-ON Triton for GDF ► South America: Brazil: Tupi for PETROBRAS Small scale terminals for various with contractors for utility companies ► China: Projects of offshore LNG terminals in cooperation with MARIC (Small and large scale LNG FPSO, large scale FSRU) ► South-East Asia 1 LNG FPSO project with Saipem Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 76
  • 77. Bureau Veritas Services for Offshore Gas Terminals Classification, certification and 3rd part verification
  • 78. Concept Appraisal► Concept appraisal principles, a close follow-up of designer work: Basic concept approval Design approval Final approval► Concept approval provides at each project stage a confirmation of the feasibility considering both the current state of the art and applicable Rules Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 78
  • 79. Concept Appraisal► Basic concept approval Mainly refers to qualitative studies Confirmation that project outlines are in line with current state of the art and applicable rules States the applicable laws, rules and code► Design approval Refers to the first quantitative studies States that the design is in accordance with the rules and criteria considered List the calculations and tests that will be required for the final concept approval► Final concept approval All calculations and tests required have been done, reviewed and approved Fabrication process and limitations are mentioned States the concept limitations Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 79
  • 80. Bureau Veritas Services for Offshore Gas Terminals New technologies review and risk analysis
  • 81. Risk analysis Constraint Flux In Functions Functional Functional Analysis Analysis Main Functions Flux Out HAZID/ Components FMECA FM AW EC orksheet Report n°XXX Operational M : ode D : ate RecommendationsN° Itemdescription FailureDescription FailureEffect R R isk educing Rating Actions/ Function C p om Mode Cause Local End Measures F S D C R arks em Inspection Maintenance Design Qualification Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 81
  • 82. Example of application► Marine systems NGL Fractionation Hull Liquefaction Containment system End Flash Gas system Mooring system Utilities Anchoring system ► Interface► Process Offloading facilities Inlet Facilities Turret system Acid Gas Removal Risers CO2 Disposal Gas Dehydration Mercury Removal NGL Recovery Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 82
  • 83. Example of methodology: Technology Qualification► Technology assessment: Evaluate the novelty of each technology used in the project • New ; Extrapolated from proven ; few references ; proven • Used in similar conditions or different conditions► FMECA (Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis) workshop: Gather technology experts Quantify the risks of each new technology Determine the main need for qualifications► Qualification plan requirements From novelty ranking and FMECA, list the critical qualification actions Based on this document the Engineer can build the qualification plan► Fitness for purpose evaluation As a conclusion of the above work, the fitness for purpose of each technology is evaluated.► Reference document: BV NI 525 Risk Based Qualification of Unproven Technology Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 83
  • 84. Example of methodology: Project Preparation► Benchmarking of technologies: Pros and Cons of each technology Building a benchmarking method► Help to prepare a FEED dossier Applicable Rules and regulations Required certificates Main studies and qualifications that will necessitate a special attention Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 84
  • 85. Bureau Veritas Services for Offshore Gas Terminals Technical Assistance
  • 86. Additional services: risk and safety studies (at FEED stage)► Marine ► Risk and safety studies Hydrodynamic analysis Computational Fire Simulation Mooring and anchoring Computational Simulation of Gas Leakage and Dispersion Structural analysis Design of Deluge Systems► Process Noise and Vibration Analyses Review of design of equipments Design of Public Address and General Alarm Certification Systems Risk analysis Static and Dynamic Structural Analyses► Riser, flexible hoses and structure Preliminary Hazard Analysis Review of design Hazard and Operability Analysis - HAZOP Certification Collision Assessment Risk analysis Dropped Object Analysis Quantitative Risk Analysis Other studies Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 86
  • 87. Technical Assistance Marine
  • 88. Hydrodynamic analysis►Hydrodynamic analysis is mandatory for gas terminals►Hull girder loads, unit motions and accelerations are to be determined for 100 years return period ► Provisions of Offshore Rules Environment data ► Scatter diagram ► Specific loading conditions for offshore permanent units Loading conditions ► Sensitivity analysis and heading study may be requested 300° 270° 240° 210° 330° 0° = 360° Y X Scatter Diagram Unit response 180° 30° Occurrence 150° 60° 90° 120° 1.0 0.9 0.8 RAO 0.7 (s) Pitc h RAO [d g /m] 0.6 Design values for 0.5 Tm Design values for 0.4 structural analysis structural analysis 0.3 d rio 0.2 Signi 0.1 ficant Pe 0.0 W ave H eight 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 Wave freq. [rad/s] (m) Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 88
  • 89. Hydrodynamic analysis► Heading analysis Waves, wind and current effects Action from anchoring, mooring of other vessel, riser…► Sea keeping motion analysis: 3D diffraction radiation theory Model tests Effect of partially filled tanks LNG Carrier Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 89
  • 90. Sloshing, Membrane tanks 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 SEA KEEPING RAO Pitch RAO [dg /m] 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 MOTIONS Wave freq. [rad/s] Scatter Diagram MODEL TESTS CFD SIMULATIONS PM EK,VI,PQS ) PI, ∆t Calibration PI, PQS, ∆t DROP TESTS MembranePI Qualification PI BV Rule Verification Dynamic Structural Analysis V Hull Scantlings t ∆t Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 90
  • 91. Relative motions► Tandem Offloading Fish tailing effect Minimum distance between unti and shuttle► Side-by-side Multi-body interaction Linear Energy Dissipation Expression of velocity potential Integration equation extended to a part of the free surface Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 91
  • 92. Alongside Mooring► The mooring between the vessels must be considered: Wires Tails Quick release hooks Fenders Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 92
  • 93. Mooring - Anchoring► Time domain simulations of mooring and anchoring Extreme Fatigue► Heading analysis Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 93
  • 94. Structural Analysis► Complete ship analysis Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 94
  • 95. Structural Analysis► 3 holds analysis Y X Z Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 95
  • 96. Structural Analysis► Details analysis Hull details Topsides / hull interface Turret Interface with containment system Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 96
  • 97. On site fatigue analysis Structural Mesh Hydrodynamic Calculation Coarse Mesh Calculation Fine Mesh Calculation Spectral Calculation Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 97
  • 98. Fatigue Analysis Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 98
  • 99. Technical AssistanceProcess & Structure
  • 100. Offshore Structures Certification ► Structure certification Structural Design Review • Jacket • Topsides structure Construction survey locally Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 100
  • 101. Classification/certification of structural equipment Structural and lifting facilities : ► Topsides Flares ► Burner boom ► Cranes (NR526) ► Spreader bars ► Topside modules ► Subsea Modules (PLEM, PLET) Reference Codes : API, Eurocode, FEM, Client specifications, Classification Societies Rules Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 101
  • 102. Classification/Certification of process equipment Offshore Pressure and mechanical equipment : ► Pressure Vessels ► Boilers ► Heat Exchangers ► Pumps and Compressors ► Piping and fitting ► Subsea systems ► Pressure Safety valves ► Atmospheric tanks Reference Codes : Class Rules, ASME VIII, PD 5500, Onshore CODAP, TEMA, API Standards, EN 13445 & 13480, ASME B31.3, CODETI, Client specifications…. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 102
  • 103. Classification/Certification of safety equipment ► ESD System, Instrumentation ► Fire and gas detection system ► Fire fighting equipment (deluge, fixed fire- extinguishing system…) ► Life saving appliances ► Passive fire protection of shelters/topside modules ► Ventilation system (H.V.A.C.) Reference Codes : Class Rules, API Standards, NFPA, SOLAS, MODU Code, Client specifications, National Regulations…. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 103
  • 104. Shop inspections & expediting, pre-shipment inspection…Inspection and Expediting of Equipment :► Pressure vessels, heat exchangers, pipingand fittings atmospheric tanks, pumps andcompressors.► Fire-fighting equipments, life-saving appliances.► Structural items, cranes and lifting equipment.► Quality control of materials, welding & heattreatment and Non-destructive testing services.► Assistance in assessment, approval & surveillanceof performance of contractor’s staff.► Worldwide shop inspection and expediting at vendors andexpediting of the purchase orders.. Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 104
  • 105. Risk-Based Inspection Inspection plan to be validated 5 Approved 4Inspection plan 3 2 1 A B C D E Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 105
  • 106. Technical AssistanceRiser, Flexible hoses
  • 107. Pipelines, Risers & Umbilicals : Our services► Assessment and verification of design on SURF projects (IRC) : rigid pipelines systems : single pipe or pipe-in-pipe, onshore and offshore flexible risers and flowlines : bonded and non-bonded type umbilicals, fiber optic cables ancillary items : bend stiffeners, buoyancy modules, bend restrictors independent calculations capabilities► Type approval certification of flexible pipe / umbilical / ancillary items manufacturers (TAC) assessment of material dossiers, material compatibility evaluation of design rules and design tools► Coordination of second and third party inspections (COC) during qualification testing (small & full scale tests and dissections) in laboratories / institutes fabrication at manufacturer’s plant offshore and onshore installations and pre-commissioning activities► Evaluation of new solutions (Concept Approval) cryogenic rigid and flexible pipes reinforced thermoplastic pipes (plastic + aramid tapes)► Appraisal of : material selection report, cathodic protection & corrosion studies fitness-for-service studies, flow assurance studies► Risk Analyses, FMECA, HAZID, for pipeline systems Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 107
  • 108. Technical AssistanceInspection Tools for Asset Integrity Management
  • 109. VeriSTAR AIMS on-service follow-up UNIT DELIVERY Unexpected Inspection SURVEYS RESULTS & Maintenance Program Modifications CORRECTIVE MAINTENANCE Improvements BORN AS DESIGNED LIVING AS IS VeriSTAR AIMS application Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 109
  • 110. Hull Life Cycle Make Thickness measurements Hull monitoring Offshore operating unitUpdate dwg HLC model Build HLC model drawings Health, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 110
  • 111. Thank You for Your Attention Move Forward with ConfidenceHealth, Safety and environmental aspects of Gas offshore Terminals – FPSO Congress - Singapore 28-29 September 2010 111

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