Electric Power Steering For The Future
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Electric Power Steering For The Future

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Electric Power Steering For The Future Electric Power Steering For The Future Document Transcript

  • Electric Power Steering for the future Brought to you by Automotive IQ By: Peter Els Steering a vehicle is no longer only about control and driver feedback; in a world of ever diminishing resources, it’s as much about conserving energy and reducing fuel consumption. All of this without diminishing the driving experience. Using a system of electric motor(s), electronic control modules and torque sensors Electric Power Steering may just fulfill these requirements! Electric power assisted steering (EPS) uses an electric motor to provide directional control for the driver, without any power-draining hydraulic systems, resulting in an improvement in fuel economy of between 3 and 9 %. Current EPS architecture With EPS, sensors detect the motion and torque of the steering column and a computer module applies assistive power via an electric motor coupled directly to either the steering gear or steering column. Most modern EPS systems have variable assist, which provides speed sensitive assistance to improve steering effort and feel for the driver. This functionality requires a delicate balance of power and control that has only been available in recent years. Besides electro-hydraulic steering, the most common EPS configurations are: Column-assist: The electric motor is mounted on the steering column. The advantage of this is that, because it’s not mounted in the engine compartment, it’s not exposed to water and heat. However, noise (often as a result of Cogging torque in the permanent magnet motor) can be a problem as it’s in close proximity to the driver. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3274 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit Automotive IQ for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses and conferences: www.automotive-iq.com
  • Pinion-assist: The electric motor is mounted where the pinion gear of the rack and pinion steering system connects to the rack. This system has better Noise Vibration and Harshness characteristics than the Column mounted motor. Rackassist: The electric motor is mounted on the rack. An advantage of this system is that the motor can be mounted anywhere on the rack, thereby simplifying packaging and fitment. Image credit: Automotive design and production Due to their high power density and efficiency, long life, low torque ripple and ease of torque control, permanent–magnet synchronous DC motors are widely used in EPS systems. However these motors also have disadvantages such as noise and mechanical vibration as well as cost. Many of these disadvantages can be reduced or even eliminated by careful engineering and production of the magnets. Development of permanent magnets ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3274 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit Automotive IQ for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses and conferences: www.automotive-iq.com