IPM In Tomatoes Peas Beans Asparagus Afvga2010

  • 1,940 views
Uploaded on

This presentation was delivered on February 20, 2010 at the Alabama Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association meeting at Auburn, AL.

This presentation was delivered on February 20, 2010 at the Alabama Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association meeting at Auburn, AL.

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,940
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5

Actions

Shares
Downloads
142
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • SL population greater than CL in the deep south.
  • There were at least two generations detected one month apart of BAW in north central AL. Three peaks could be detected one month apart in south AL along the Gulf Coast. Trends were unclear in northern AL.
  • Trends in FAW population were stronger than BAW seen before. FAW pressures were high in all parts of AL. There were at least two generations detected one month apart of FAW in north central AL. Three peaks could be detected one month apart in south AL along the Gulf Coast. Impact of weather parameters was also stronger on FAW populations than BAW.

Transcript

  • 1. IPM in Tomatoes, BEANS & Peas, ASPARAGUS
    Dr. Ayanava Majumdar
    Ext. Entomologist, State SARE Coordinator
    Gulf Coast Research & Ext. Center
    8300 State Hwy 104, Fairhope AL 36532
    Tel: (251) 331-8416
    bugdoctor@auburn.edu
  • 2. Presentation layout
    Status of IPM in vegetables (AL)
    General listing of insect pests:
    Pest ID
    Insect monitoring/forecasting program
    Insecticidal recommendations*
    Non-insecticidal management of insects
    New insecticidal mode of action
    Extension resources in Alabama
  • 3. General listing of pests
  • 4. Why practice IPM?
    • Integrated pest management (IPM) is a threshold based decision management system which leads to judicious use of multiple pest control tactics.
    • 5. IPM is currently insecticide-intensive…
    • 6. Loss of tomatoes in the absence of insecticides: 95% (AL)*
    • 7. Nationally, average gain from IPM is $19 for every dollar spent (field crops)*
    • 8. Insecticide use in AL, 1992-2002: asparagus (-30%), green peas (-73%), green beans (-36%), tomatoes (-20%)…
    • 9. Major damage to crop is caused by:
    • 10. Lack of early detection
    • 11. Insecticide resistance
    *L. Gianessi, 2009. Crop Protection Research Institute.
  • 12. Insect monitoring project
    (new in 2009)
    • Use traps for early detection of pests
    • 13. What does trap catch tell you?
    Catch = pop. density x activity
    • Commercial traps/lures used
    • 14. Trapping period: June-October
    • 15. Trapping interval (2009): 14 days
  • Why use pheromone traps?
    Generate information you can use WITHIN SEASON
    Know WHAT to scout for
    Know WHEN to scout
    Automatic identification of insects
    Prediction models will be avail. with more study
    Stink bug trap
    Wing trap
    Pherocon trap
    Bucket trap
  • 16. TOMATO INSECT PESTS
  • 17. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Sample ten plants in several locations
    Yellow sticky traps at edge of field
    Like cool, dry weather
    Watch for ants and lady beetles
    ET = 50% leaves with aphids
    Potato aphid, Macrosiphumeuphorbiae
    Green peach aphid, Myzuspersicae
  • 18. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Use sticky cards (yellow, blue)
    Bag and shake technique
    No action threshold
    Use resistant varieties (BHN 444, 589, 640, Bella Rosa)
    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis
    Tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca
  • 19. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Monitor level of defoliation
    Sample small plants with sweep net during morning hours
    Observe activity of parasitoids, predators (sweep net)
    ET = 5-10% defoliation early season, 25-30% defoliation mid-season
    Flea beetles (tobacco-Epitrixhertipennis, pale striped, etc.)
  • 20. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Start looking on border rows
    Scout intensely short crop (<6 inch)
    Estimate no. of insects on 10 plants
    ET = 5 beetles per 10 seedling or 10% defoliation in short crop
    Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsadecemlineata
    Larva of lady beetle (beneficial insect!)
  • 21. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Examine green fruit, stem terminals
    Scout for egg masses or larvae
    Use pheromone traps to detect first flight; ET = 5-10 moths per night when temp. is <85F
    ET is ½ if temp. is >85F
    Threat is high if one fruit each plant is damaged
    Tomato fruitworm, Helicoverpazea
    Tobacco budworm, Heliothisvirescens
  • 22. Corn earworm
    Insect density (overall) per site
    6
    3
    17
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    10
    8
    25
    3
    7
    12
    5
    8
    16
    11
    Year 2009
  • 23. Tobacco budworm
    Insect density (overall) per site
    3
    3
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    2
    1
    7
    6
    20
    3
    6
    15
    3
    Year 2009
  • 24. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Minor foliar pest (ET = 5 larvae per 10 plants)
    Easy to collect & identify – shake and collect
    Watch for sun scald on fruits, esp. 20% defoliation
    Look for fecal pellets on leaves
    Cabbage looper, Trichoplusiani
    Soybean looper, Pseudoplusiaincludens
  • 25. Cabbage looper
    5
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    3
    3
    10
    2
    3
    12
    9
  • 26. Soybean looper
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    2
    6
    1
    2
    15
    14
  • 27. What is it?
    Southern green stink bug, Nezaraviridula
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Know the good species (next slide)
    Use a sweep net
    Use pheromone trap (expensive?)
    Intensify scouting at fruit setting
    ET = 0.25 bugs per 10 plants (green fruit stage)
    Green stink bug, Acrosternumhilare
    Brown stink bug, Euschistusservus
  • 28. Predacious stink bugs
    • Typically have short beak (plant bugs have long beaks)
    • 29. Abundant in orchards, thick crop canopies, weedy borders
    • 30. Voracious feeders of caterpillars
    • 31. Watch numbers: a sudden increase may indicated pest presence
    SB feeding on armyworm
    Podisusmaculiventris
    Euthyrhynchusfloridanus
    Alcaeorrhynchusgrandis
    Source: R. Mizell, UFL Extension. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in534
  • 32. BEAN/PEA INSECT PESTS
  • 33. International experience
    India is a major producer of beans in the world. A farm family sorts extra-long green beans in India before sale in market.
  • 34. Uniqueness of Pea/Bean plants
    Produce abundant foliage (30% leaf loss prior to bloom is OK)
    Rapid growing, profusely flowering…attracts many insects
  • 35. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Sample ten plants in several locations
    Yellow sticky traps at edge of field
    Like cool, dry weather
    ET = 50% leaves with aphids
    Potato aphid, Macrosiphumeuphorbiae
    Green peach aphid, Myzuspersicae
  • 36. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Use sticky cards (yellow, blue)
    Bag and shake technique
    No action threshold
    Use resistant varieties
    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis
    Tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca
  • 37. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Late planted crop in dry areas!!
    Uproot the plant and look near the soil line
    Look for silken tubes near entrance hole in stem
    Use pheromone traps (strongly recommended)
    Our finding: very high moth activity throughout the southern and central counties
    Lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpuslignosellus
  • 38. Why early detection of pests is useful?
    Lesser cornstalk borer in many crops (Clarke, Washington, Escambia Co., Henry Counties)
  • 39. Lesser cornstalk borer
    Insect density (overall) per site
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    142
    119
    76
    46
    77
    116
    143
    Year 2009
  • 40. What is it?
    Mexican bean beetle, Epilachnavarivestis
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Extensive defoliation (ladder form)
    Look for yellow to orange clusters of eggs
    Intensify scouting during June-July
  • 41. What is it?
    Pod damage on soybean
    Bean leaf beetle, Cerotomatrifurcata
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Beetles appear in red or yellow, use sweep net
    Watch for damage on pods
    Round holes on leaves, root damage by larvae
  • 42. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Minor foliar pest (ET = 5 larvae per 10 plants)
    Easy to collect & identify – shake and collect
    Watch for sun scald on fruits, esp. 20% defoliation
    Look for fecal pellets on leaves
    Cabbage looper, Trichoplusiani
    Soybean looper, Pseudoplusiaincludens
  • 43. What is it?
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Very destructive on peas (pod damage)
    Check field edges, shelter belts
    Difficult to control insect – timely detection vital
    Cowpea curculio, Chalcodermusaeneus
  • 44. What is it?
    Southern green stink bug, Nezaraviridula
    Monitoring/scouting techniques:
    Direct pod damage – leaves a scar on pods/seed
    Watch for aborted flowers due to injected toxins
    Use a sweep net to estimate populations (ten swings)
    ET = 1 per six feet row (South Carolina)
    Lygus bug, Lyguslineolaris
  • 45. Insect pests of Asparagus
    Beet armyworm, Spodopteraexigua
    Common asparagus beetle, Criocerisasparagi
    Asparagus aphid, Brachycorynellaasparagi
    Fall armyworm, Spodopterafrugiperda
  • 46. Outbreak of armyworms in soybean, peanuts (2009)
  • 47. Beet armyworm
    Insect density (overall) per site
    4
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    10
    27
    21
    19
    33
    25
    25
    8
    49
    36
    Year 2009
  • 48. Fall armyworm
    Insect density (overall) per site
    20
    17
    Monthly average activity (statewide)
    19
    29
    15
    27
    32
    16
    12
    13
    48
    36
    Year 2009
  • 49. Diagnosis of A Pest Problem
    Five steps to be a smart scout
    Step 1. Define the problem (ecosystem approach)
    Step 2. Look for patterns (early detection)
    Step 3. Use recommended scouting procedures (econ. threshold)
    Step 4. Monitor problem development (sample frequently)
    Step 5. Determine causes of injury , insect identification
  • 50. NEW ONLINE RESOURCES
  • 51. IPM COmmunicationREsources
    (IPM-CORE) Project
    Goal: Synchronized rapid IPM information delivery to growers
    • Project archive: www.aces.edu/go/85 or www.aces.edu/go/88
    • 52. “AU Pest Alert” (direct email): May-October
    • 53. Web outreach: Blogs, YouTube, AlabamaCrops.com, AGFAX.COM
    • 54. IPM Hotline (messages): 1-800-446-0375
    • 55. Make sure you see the AL IPM EXHIBIT
    • 56. Timely revisions to Extension bulletins
  • IPM Trapping Coordinators:
    A. Majumdar
    H. Fadamiro
    K. Flanders
    IPM Team Members:
    Lloyd Chapman
    Neil Kelly
    Michael Reeves
    Gary Gray
    James Miles
    William East, Jr.
    Brandon Dillard
    Leonard Kuykendall
    Chris Becker
    Timothy Reed
    Acknowledgements
    Thank you very much.
    Signup for email Pest Alerts in 2010!