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UC Expo 2010 - Best Practices: Deploying Microsfot OCS on Brocade Network Infrastructure

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  • Packet loss - Several factors make packet loss requirements somewhat variable. Even with the same average packet loss, the way the packets are lost influences the impact on Voice Quality:There are two types of packet loss: random packet loss over time (where single packets might be dropped every so often during the call) and “bursty” packet loss (where several, contiguous packets can be lost in a short time window). Losing ten contiguous packets is worse than losing ten packets evenly spaced over an hour time span.Packet loss may be also be more noticeable for larger voice payloads (i.e. packets representing a longer time sample) than for smaller ones, because more voice is lost in a larger payload.Packet loss may be more tolerable for one codec over another, because some codecs have some loss concealment capabilities.Packet loss requirements are tighter for tones (other than DTMF) than for voice. The ear is less able to detect packet loss during speech (variable-pitch), than during a tone (consistent pitch).Even small amounts of packet loss can greatly affect traditional TTY devices’ ability to work properly as well as transmission of faxes using the usual fax protocol T.30 over IP networks; standards such as T.38 have been developed to reduce the impact of network impairments on the reliability of faxing over IP, but in practice they are not always supported, or the IP network may not be detected.
  • Processing delay includes the time required collecting a frame of voice samples before processing by the speech encoder can occur, the actual process of encoding, encrypting if appropriate, packetizing for transmission, and the corresponding reverse process on the receiving end, including the jitter buffer used to compensate for varying packet arriving delay on the receiving end. The complete end-to-end processing delay is often in the 60 ms to 120 ms range when all of the contributing factors are taken into account. The processing delay is essentially within a fixed range determined by the vendor’s technology and implementation choices. Encoding and decoding might be repeated several times however if there is any inline transcoding from one codec to another, for example for some hand-off between networks, in which case accumulated processing delay can become disruptive.Serialization delay is a fixed delay required to clock a voice or data frame onto a network interface, placing the bits onto the wire for transmission. The delay will vary based on the clocking speed of the interface. A lower speed circuit (such as a modem interface or smaller transmission circuit) will have a higher serialization delay than a higher speed circuit. It can be quite significant on low-speed links and occurs on every single link of a multi-hop network.Network delay is mostly caused by inspecting, queuing and buffering of packets, which can occur at traffic shaping buffers (such as “leaky bucket” buffers) sometimes encountered at various network ingress points, or at various router hops encountered by the packet along the way. Network delay on the internet generally averages less than 40 ms when there is no major congestion. Modernization of routers has contributed to reducing this delay over time.Propagation delay is the distance traveled by the packet divided by the speed of signal propagation (i.e. speed of light). Propagation delay on transcontinental routes is relatively small – typically less than 40 ms – but propagation delay across complex intercontinental paths can be much larger. This is especially true when satellite circuits are involved or on very long routes such as Australia to South-Africa via Europe, for example, which might incur up to 500 ms of one way propagation delay. Propagation delay can only be optimized by designing the shortest possible path links.
  • For microsoftocs known clients use active directory group policy, otherwise ensure demarkation point set to untrusted on the ports
  • Processing delay includes the time required collecting a frame of voice samples before processing by the speech encoder can occur, the actual process of encoding, encrypting if appropriate, packetizing for transmission, and the corresponding reverse process on the receiving end, including the jitter buffer used to compensate for varying packet arriving delay on the receiving end. The complete end-to-end processing delay is often in the 60 ms to 120 ms range when all of the contributing factors are taken into account. The processing delay is essentially within a fixed range determined by the vendor’s technology and implementation choices. Encoding and decoding might be repeated several times however if there is any inline transcoding from one codec to another, for example for some hand-off between networks, in which case accumulated processing delay can become disruptive.Serialization delay is a fixed delay required to clock a voice or data frame onto a network interface, placing the bits onto the wire for transmission. The delay will vary based on the clocking speed of the interface. A lower speed circuit (such as a modem interface or smaller transmission circuit) will have a higher serialization delay than a higher speed circuit. It can be quite significant on low-speed links and occurs on every single link of a multi-hop network.Network delay is mostly caused by inspecting, queuing and buffering of packets, which can occur at traffic shaping buffers (such as “leaky bucket” buffers) sometimes encountered at various network ingress points, or at various router hops encountered by the packet along the way. Network delay on the internet generally averages less than 40 ms when there is no major congestion. Modernization of routers has contributed to reducing this delay over time.Propagation delay is the distance traveled by the packet divided by the speed of signal propagation (i.e. speed of light). Propagation delay on transcontinental routes is relatively small – typically less than 40 ms – but propagation delay across complex intercontinental paths can be much larger. This is especially true when satellite circuits are involved or on very long routes such as Australia to South-Africa via Europe, for example, which might incur up to 500 ms of one way propagation delay. Propagation delay can only be optimized by designing the shortest possible path links.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Infrastructure & Delivery Management Theatre
      Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networksa best practice Guide
      Harry PettyDirector, Product Marketing
      UC EXPO
      March 11, 2010
      © 2010 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc.
    • 2. Legal Disclaimer
      All or some of the products detailed in this presentation may still be under development and certain specifications, including but not limited to, release dates, prices, and product features, may change. The products may not function as intended and a production version of the products may never be released. Even if a production version is released, it may be materially different from the pre-release version discussed in this presentation.
      NOTHING IN THIS PRESENTATION SHALL BE DEEMED TO CREATE A WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NONINFRINGEMENT OF THIRD-PARTY RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO ANY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES REFERENCED HEREIN.
      Brocade, the B-wing symbol, BigIron, DCX, Fabric OS, FastIron, File Lifecycle Manager, IronPoint, IronShield, IronView, IronWare, JetCore, MyView, NetIron, SecureIron, ServerIron, StorageX, and TurboIron are registered trademarks, and DCFM and SAN Health are trademarks of Brocade Communications Systems, Inc., in the United States and/or in other countries. All other brands, products, or service names are or may be trademarks or service marks of, and are used to identify, products or services of their respective owners.
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      2
    • 3. Abstract
      Is your Network Infrastructure Ready for Voice and UC Services?
      While typical enterprise networks have sufficient bandwidth to accommodate VoIP services, voice and video calls demand low latency with high Quality of Service (QoS)
      Additionally, there are other aspects of the network infrastructure that need to be considered in the process of planning for a successful VoIP or UC deployment
      This session will explore the challenges of deploying voice and UC services in legacy enterprise networks and how to UC-enable your network infrastructure
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      3
    • 4. Agenda
      • Unified Communications Challenges
      • 5. Office Communications Server Deployment Models
      • 6. Designing OCS Network Infrastructure
      • 7. Layer 2-3 Network Infrastructure
      • 8. Layer 4-7 Application Delivery
      • 9. The Best Practice for the Best ROI
      Is your Network Infrastructure Ready for Voice and UC Services?
      4
      March 11, 2010
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
    • 10. Unified Communications Challenges
      Packet Loss
      Packet loss occurs when packets fail to reach their destination, and is expressed as the percentage of packets lost en-route across the network
      IP backbones and LANs are designed to prevent packet losses greater than 0.5%, whereas Internet routing can result in losses exceeding 10%
      WiFi-connected devices can experience packet loss in excess of 15%
      Jitter
      Expressed in milliseconds, jitter is a measure of the time variability in the arrival of successive packets
      Jitter can result from packets taking different routes, or from congestion on certain routes causing packets to get delayed in queues
      Microsoft OCS 2007 R2 offers ‘time-warping’ jitter buffer control
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      5
    • 11. Unified Communications Challenges
      Delay/Latency
      Delay is the measure of the time required for the packets of a voice signal to traverse the network
      The four types of delay include processing, serialization, network, and propagation
      Propagation delay can be adversely impacted by increased distance and connection type (e.g. satellite), but can be improved by selecting the shortest path
      150 milliseconds of total one-way delay is the upper limit for the best voice quality, and any delay exceeding this will lead to echo and talk-over effects
      Bandwidth
      The measure of bandwidth of an end-to-end network path that is actually available at a given point in time to applications or network flows
      Not having enough bandwidth on uplinks or the WAN
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      6
    • 12. Enterprise Deployment Models
      Internet
      Firewall
      Standard Deployment
      OCS 2007 R2 Standard Edition is deployed with the Frontend Server, Backend Database, A/V Conferencing Server, Web Conferencing Server, and Web Components Server installed on a single physical computer
      Recommended for small to medium size companies
      Can support up to 5000 users per server
      Add more servers as demand increases
      DMZ
      OCS Edge
      OCS Edge
      OCS Antivirus
      OCS Antivirus
      OCS Edge
      OCS Antivirus
      Firewall
      Data
      Center
      Campus
      LAN
      Aggregation/ Core
      NetIron MLX
      Access -
      FastIron CX-PoE+
      Access – FCX
      SQL Server
      OCS Frontend, AV, Monitoring, Web Conferencing
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      7
    • 13. Large EnterpriseDeployment Models
      Internet
      Expanded Deployment
      OCS 2007 R2 Enterprise Edition in the consolidated configuration, one or more Enterprise Edition servers are deployed, each running the Frontend Server, A/V Conferencing Server, Web Conferencing Server, and Web Components Server
      Recommended for most organizations
      Provides high performance and high availability with easy scalability
      A hardware load balancer is required when two or more Enterprise Edition servers make up a pool
      Firewall
      Access – FastIron CX
      DMZ
      OCS Edge
      OCS Edge
      OCS Antivirus
      OCS Antivirus
      Firewall
      Core - NetIron MLX
      Internal Network
      Aggregation – FastIron SX
      Load Balance – ServerIron ADX
      OCS Frontend, AV, Monitoring, Web Conferencing
      SQL Server
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      8
    • 14. Data Center Layer 2-3 OCS Network Design
      CampusLAN
      Multi-tier
      Depending on size of network, use three-tier architecture
      Redundancy
      Provide redundancy at all levels
      Link Aggregation Groups
      Provide at least 10GbE dynamic LAGs between each layer
      Monitor LAGs and WAN link to see if congestion is occurring
      NetIron MLX
      Core
      FastIron SX
      Aggregation
      ServerIron ADX
      OCS Servers
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      9
    • 15. Data Center Layer 4-7 OCS Network Design
      High Availability
      ServerIron ADX switch pairs in front of Enterprise Edition pools of OCS Directors, Frontend and Edge servers maximize application uptime and server farm utilization
      Security
      Shield applications from malicious attack without performance degradation
      Scalability
      ADX receives all client requests, performing health checks to identify outages and direct client connections to the most available resource, while servers are added or subtracted from the network in real time
      ServerIron ADX HA Pair
      server virtual EDVIP 10.5.57.90
      server virtual DIRVIP 10.5.57.90
      server virtual FEVIP 10.10.57.13
      OCS 2007 R2
      Edge Servers
      server real ED1 10.5.57.11
      server real ED2 10.5.57.12
      OCS 2007 R2
      Directors
      server real DIR1 10.10.57.8
      server real DIR2 10.10.57.9
      OCS 2007 R2
      Frontend Servers
      server real FE1 10.10.57.11
      server real FE2 10.10.57.12
      Ports Load Balanced
      server port 5060 tcp
      server port 5061 tcp
      server port 5063tcp
      server port 135 tcp
      server port 80 tcp
      server port 443 tcp
      server port 444 tcp
      server port 5069 tcp
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      10
    • 16. Best Practice—Layer 2-3
      Deploy Rapid Spanning Tree to speed up convergence time
      Configure ports that are connected to other switches as point-to-point and all other ports as edge devices
      Leverage VRRP-e
      Increases availability of default gateways servicing the clients
      Internet
      VRID1
      Router1 = Master
      Interface IP = 192.53.5.2
      VIP = 192.53.5.1
      Priority = 110
      VRID1
      Router1 = Master
      Interface IP = 192.53.5.3
      VIP = 192.53.5.1
      Priority = 100
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      11
    • 17. Best Practice—Layer 2-3
      Use Quality of Service (QoS) throughout
      Assign higher priority to voice than video traffic
      Apply QoS on all switches so that QoS is maintained on each hop
      Helps reduce jitter on voice and video traffic
      Assign DSCP values within Active Directory Group Policy so that all clients apply the same level of QoS
      Use Link Aggregation Groups (LAG)
      Both sides of a LAG automatically negotiate and configure themselves
      Load balances traffic across dynamic LAGs
      Use QoS and dynamic LAGs throughout the network
      12
      March 11, 2010
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
    • 18. Best Practice—Layer 2-3
      Service quality:
      Provision network capacity for the demanding voice/video applications
      Monitor service quality through S-Flow monitoring tools
      Power delivery:
      All phones are PoE powered
      Access layer switches can deliver max PoE power on all ports
      March 11, 2010
      © 2010 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc.
      • Auto-configuration:
      • 19. Device configured automatically: LLDP-MED based phone configuration
      • 20. Phones auto discover voice VLAN
      • 21. Availability:
      • 22. Redundant components across the board power supplies, management modules, fabric modules …
      • 23. Redundant network topology
    • Best Practice—Layer 4-7
      Always use ADX HA pairs to eliminate a single point of failure
      Active Hot Standby: One ADX active, the other is standby with shared MAC address
      Active-Standby VIP – both ADXs can receive traffic buy only one VIP is acting in standby
      Active-Active: Both ADXs are active allowing for oversubscription
      Use Global Server Load Balancing in multi OCS R2 Server farms to distribute services transparently across multiple sites
      Use one-arm, or DSR mode, which is less network-intrusive
      UC Expo | Deploying Microsoft OCS on Brocade Networks
      March 11, 2010
      14
    • 24. Branch / Remote Sites
      Internet
      New York
      Brocade MLX
      OSPF 11
      Brocade FCX
      OSPF 20 - 50ms Latency
      Corporate Site
      San Francisco
      Brocade SX
      Austin
      SQL, Exchange, and SharePoint Clusters
      Brocade ADX
      OSPF 30 - 25ms Latency
      Brocade FCX
      Brocade
      FC SAN
      OCS R2
      Monitoring
      Seattle
      OCS R2 Edge Server
      DMZ
      OSPF 40 - 5ms Latency
      Brocade FCX
      OCS R2 Director
      OCS R2 Front End
      Fabrikam Sports
      Network Topology
      March 11, 2010
      UC Expo | Scaling and Securing Your Microsoft OCS Investment
      15
    • 25. Best Practice for the Best ROI
      • For Campus LAN,
      • 26. Use high performance edge, use QoS, monitor sFlow
      • 27. Push L3 to the edge, use RST for L2
      • 28. For Data Center LAN,
      • 29. Design topology and network elements for reliability
      • 30. Use flat L2 for servers, RST for L2 access
      • 31. For Application Delivery
      • 32. Design for app availability and reliability
    • THANK YOU
      For more information, please visit www.brocade.com