Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI) Summary V.2.4

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The REI Summary was created by a team of people from the Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI) at Case Western Reserve University in the Spring of 2005. This document provides an overview of the …

The REI Summary was created by a team of people from the Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI) at Case Western Reserve University in the Spring of 2005. This document provides an overview of the transformative work begun at the Center from 2003-2005 under the leadership of Ed Morrison, Executive Director, REI.

The REI Summary tells the story of the important role of colleges and universities in regional economic development. The Summary provides a clear picture of the objectives, activities, and results of investing in a small team of research and practitioner leaders in Source Economic Development at a University to accelerate regional transformation.

Working with community leaders and consultants, the REI team - Ed Morrison, Betsey Merkel, Susan Altshuler, Matt Kozink, and Dennis Coughlin - coached, mentored, and trained leaders from business, civic, academic, and government to understand how to work in open systems, and to build open economic networks to increase regional social capital and strengthen emergent industry clusters in Northeast Ohio.

The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) is the not for profit spin off of REI. I-Open is based in Northeast Ohio and continues to work in collaboration with colleges, universities, libraries, organizations and government with citizens to advance regional transformation.

You can learn more about I-Open's work at http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net

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  • The REI Summary was created by the Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI) team at Case Western Reserve University in the Spring of 2005. This document provides an overview of the transformative work begun at the Center from 2003-2005 under the leadership of Ed Morrison, Executive Director, REI.

    The REI Summary tells the story of the important role of colleges and universities in regional economic development. The Summary provides a clear picture of the objectives, activities, and results of investing in a small team of research and practitioner leaders in Source Economic Development at a University to accelerate regional transformation.

    Working with community leaders and consultants, the REI team - Ed Morrison, Betsey Merkel, Susan Altshuler, Matt Kozink, and Dennis Coughlin - coached, mentored, and trained leaders from business, civic, academic, and government to understand how to work in open systems, and to build open economic networks to increase regional social capital and strengthen emergent industry clusters in Northeast Ohio.

    The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) is a not for profit spin off of REI. I-Open is based in Northeast Ohio and continues to work in collaboration with colleges, universities, libraries, organizations and government with citizens to advance regional transformation.

    You can learn more about I-Open’s work at http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
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  • 1. BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR CASE REI CASE CENTER FOR REGIONAL ECONOMIC ISSUES 216.368.5110 June 6, 2005 111 9 B e l l f l o w e r R d . C l e v e l a n d , O H 4 4 1 0 6 • t e l e p h o n e : 2 1 6 . 3 6 8 . 5 11 0 • w w w. r e i . c a s e . e d u
  • 2. Table of Contents Executive Summary 3 A Brief History of REI 4 The REI Strategy 6 REI’s Major Accomplishments Since 2003 8 Testimonials of REI’s Performance 10 Open Source Economic Development Model 20 Current REI Initiatives 21 REI.Tuesdays 24 Alignment of REI with Open Source Economic Development 29 Alignment of REI Initiatives with University Strategy 33 C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 1
  • 3. Alignment of REI Initiatives with Weatherhead Strategy 38 APPENDIX: Estimating the Marketing Value of REI to Case 41 APPENDIX: The University Strategy 42 APPENDIX: The Emerging Weatherhead Strategy 45 C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 2
  • 4. Executive Summary Purpose This document provides insights into the role that the Case Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI) plays at the Uni- versity. This document is a companion to the REI business plan. REI has begun building clusters of innovative businesses in Northeast Ohio. The model of Open Source Economic Devel- opment, developed by REI’s Executive Director Ed Morrison, generates the strategy maps needed to build these clusters. These clusters include businesses forming around: • A new approach to preventive health care and disease management; • Creative digital media; • Bio-fuels production and distribution, as well as other new energy sources; • Hybrid electric vehicles; • Advanced logistics education and training; • Tele-working with advanced IT infrastructures; • Automation and training for component manufacturing. Next Steps Weatherhead and the University should determine how they will support REI’s strategy for growth. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 3
  • 5. A Brief History of REI • Founded in 1983 by the business leadership in Cleveland, following the recommendation of a Rand report. The recommendation encouraged the city’s leadership to establish an analytic capability to shape economic develop- ment policies and programs. • The REI concept sought a unique mix of research and practice. The original purpose of REI was to 1) monitor the Cleveland metropolitan economy; 2) develop a research agenda that identifies the long-term, structural causes of change inthe regional economy; and 3) provide a forum for informed policy choices. • The Cleveland Foundation made a ten year commitment to REI. The commitment was to provide investment that could be leveraged to develop REI into a permanent community resource. • Cleveland State University provided the original home for REI. Michael Fogarty appointed as the first director. In 1984, REI moved to the Federal Reserve Bank after a dispute with CSU. • REI moved to Case in 1986 as a new Center for Regional Economic Issues at the Weatherhead School. REI re- flected a partnership among Case, the Federal Reserve Bank, and the Cleveland Foundation. • In 1987, REI received a five year grant from the Ameritech Foundation (now the SBC Foundation). In 1994, Amer- itech established an endowed chair. The original purpose of the chair were 1) to provide funds to support REI and 2) to support a person with sufficient publications to warrant the title of professor. Fogarty held the Amer- itech chair from 1994 to 1998. • In 1998, Richard Shatten was appointed director of REI. Shatten, a former McKinsey consultant, refocused REI on the practical aspects of economic development strategy. Case agreed to change the title of the chair to “Ameritech Chair for the Practice” so the funds could be used to support Shatten and REI. • In 2002, Richard Shatten died. At the time of his death, Shatten had built the Center into the permanent commu- nity resource originally envisioned by the founders. The Cleveland and Gund Foundations were continuing to C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 4
  • 6. each provide $100,000 a year in funding. In addition, prior to Shatten’s death SBC Foundation announced a four year $1 million grant to REI. At the time of his death, REI held reserve balances in excess of $400,000. • In 2002, the administration of the Weatherhead School decided to split the position of director into two positions: an executive director with practical experience in economic development and an academic director. In 2003, the Dean of the Weatherhead School recruited Ed Morrison to be executive director and Scott Shane to be the aca- demic director. Morrison assumed his position in August, 2003. • To refocus REI as a “think and do” tank, Morrison reorganized REI’s activities around the model of Open Source Economic Development. This model demonstrates to civic leaders how to build regional economies based on open innovation systems, sometimes called “clusters”. Morrison developed the model during his twenty years of practice as an economic development consultant to cities, states and regions. • To cut costs, Morrison filed a reorganization plan with the University to reduce the permanent University posi- tions at REI from six to two. In March 2004, Morrison submitted core funding requests to The Cleveland Founda- tion and the Gund Foundation to assist in rebuilding REI. These funding requests are still pending. • To build a foundation for cluster development in Northeast Ohio, Morrison worked with Steve Minter at Cleve- land State University to launch the Universities Collaborative, a practical economic development partnership among the region’s colleges and universities. • To meet REI’s obligations to the SBC Foundation, REI began a series of weekly events, REI.Tuesdays that launched the Open Source model in Northeast Ohio; doubled the number of “annual meetings” to two a year; and strengthened its relationship with ideastream, the local public television station. In 2004, ideastream and REI announced a new partnership with MacNeił Lehrer Productions to conduct citizen deliberations on education and the economy in Northeast Ohio. • REI accepted an invitation from the Indiana Humanities Council to introduce the Open Source model at twelve regional forums in Indiana in 2005. As part of this work, REI has formed a partnership with Purdue’s new Center for Regional Development. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 5
  • 7. The REI Strategy Vision Establish Case, Northeast Ohio and REI as global leaders in advanced regional economic development. Mission Provide the practices and tools to transform regional economies and achieve sustainable growth. Strategic Activities • Conduct research.-- Create and grow a portfolio of actionable hypotheses for building REI’s intellectual property; • Build open innovation networks.-- Incubate and support innovative, collaborative networks -- “clusters” -- that im- prove regional economic performance; • Develop products and services.-- Create and market a portfolio of products and services to increase advanced regions’ economic development effectiveness; • Educate.-- Conduct civic discussions, classroom activities and public policy debates to promote creative, innovative and sustainable development practices. Metrics • Building Case’s national brand • Generating funds for the University Sample Initiatives • Conducting research ‣ Analyze cost structure of Cuyahoga County government ‣ Analyze workforce development systems in Northeast Ohio ‣ Analyze Ohio aerospace markets C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 6
  • 8. ‣ Design a Cleveland innovation zone • Building open innovation networks ‣ Incubate a new Center for Health and Disease Management ‣ Incubate a new bio-diesel distribution business in East Cleveland ‣ Build network of sustainability organizations in Northeast Ohio ‣ Develop open innovation system for small component manufacturers in Northeast Ohio • Developing products and services ‣ Promote Open Source Economic Development model ‣ Publish EDPro Weblog ‣ Develop electronic magazine on innovation in Northeast Ohio • Educating civic leaders ‣ Conduct weekly dialogues on creativity and innovation in Northeast Ohio ‣ Conduct semi-annual meetings on regional economic development in Northeast Ohio ‣ Promote the policy connection between early child care and economic development ‣ Develop framework for regional, national and international energy policy analysis C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 7
  • 9. REI’s Major Accomplishments Since 2003 • Created the Universities Collaborative, an economic development partnership among Case, Cleveland State Uni- versity, Kent State University, Lorain County Community College, The University of Akron, and Youngstown State University. The Universities Collaborative, developed in consultation with the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education (NOCHE), provides the foundation for cluster development in Northeast Ohio. • Launched a strategy to build innovative networks (“clusters”) in Northeast Ohio. These initiatives include: ‣ A new cluster in “predict and prevent” health care; ‣ A new cluster for bio-fuels production and distribution; ‣ A partnership with TransTech to develop a hybrid electric vehicles demonstration project; ‣ A new cluster in creative digital media; ‣ An innovation and training consortium among small component manufacturers; • Conducted 78 REI.Tuesday forums to launch the Open Source Economic Development model. REI.Tuesdays gen- erated over 2,700 visits to the Peter B. Lewis Building by members of the community. • Incubated a series of economic development initiatives, based on discussions at REI.Tuesdays: ‣ A new cluster of businesses involved in supporting teleworking ‣ REAL NEO, a new community-based platform for collaboration based on the model of Open Source Eco- nomic Development; ‣ A new partnership among area schools, led by Baldwin Wallace, to develop a stronger network to support international students; ‣ A car sharing project for University Circle that has been funded by the Civic Innovation Lab; ‣ A new network of sustainability organizations in Northeast Ohio called the Green City Blue Lake network; ‣ An emerging partnership among REI, the Center on Poverty and The Schubert Center for Child develop- ment on early childhood development and economic development; C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 8
  • 10. ‣ The New Energy Roundtable, an innovative initiative to structure an on-going public dialogue on energy technology assessments for regional, national and international markets. • Established a partnership with ideastream and MacNeil Lehrer Productions to conduct an annual Deliberation Day on critical public policy issues. • Continued partnership with ideastream to produce the “Making Change” series on public radio, which explores alternatives to “The Quiet Crisis”. • Established a partnership with the Indiana Humanities Council to conduct twelve regional forums throughout Indiana to encourage regional economic development using the Open Source Economic Development model. • Established a partnership with the Center for Regional Development, a new initiative of Purdue University. • Managed a process to develop initiatives for East Cleveland 2010. These initiatives include a partnership with Cleveland State and Kent State University to provide support to East Cleveland; an initiative to upgrade com- puter systems to improve tax collections and water fees; and other initiatives. • Published the EDPro Weblog, a publication that reaches 1,300 economic development professionals throughout the U.S. each week. • Developed a new electronic magazine on innovation in Northeast Ohio. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 9
  • 11. Testimonials of REI’s Performance • REI’s focus on building networks and on magnifying the effectiveness of existing networks in NE Ohio provides exactly the kind of practical activity that makes best use of our resources in our program (foreign students and business professionals) and opens immediate ways that we can contribute through internationalization to the re- gion’s development. My initial excitement on affiliating with REI has already been justified, and I am very confi- dent and optimistic about our future together.   Malcolm Watson Director, International MBA Baldwin-Wallace College • It is with great pleasure that I write in unequivocal support of Ed Morrison and REI. Ed and his staff have been tireless in their efforts to reach out and communicate with the surrounding community. I cannot applaud these important efforts enough. Their success in doing this is demonstrated in the energetic collaborations between in- dividuals and institutions where none existed before. I think that the fact that three “Tuesdays at REI” have been held at the Natural History Museum clearly demon- strates that the invisible walls that, in the past, impeded communication between CWRU and University Circle are being razed through greater communication. Ed and his REI colleagues are helping make this long needed transition. I was very flattered to have been invited to participate in three REI events, again showing increased communication between our respective institutions. Another example is the recent “Cultural Collaborative” between the Western Reserve Historical Society, the Cleveland Botanical Garden, and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. This event represents not only a novel and unique partnership in University Circle but to North America as well. This developing collaborative was assisted by Ed and one of his students. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 10
  • 12. In sum, I fully support the work being done by Ed Morrison and REI. I look forward to working with them in the future. Bruce Latimer, Ph.D. Executive Director Cleveland Museum of Natural History • Thank you very much for the opportunity to share how impressed I am with what you and Betsey Merkel have done at REI – your organization has changed my life. When I moved into Cleveland Heights, I had misgivings, because the distance to work is farther, and the taxes are higher; but now I am overjoyed. Your organization has introduced me to high caliber people who make things happen and get things done. I can’t wait to have a party for the new friends I have made through REI. Furthermore, I am impressed with the more immediate projects that REI has inspired. People like Herb Crowther and Phil Lane are developing bio-fuel plants and electric cars. You also have other energy-related initiatives, along with ways to improve Cleveland’s infrastructure. You are doing a great job, and I am proud to be part of it. I am copying this note to Art Anton, the President and CEO, of Swagelok Company, where I have worked for 38 years. Art, like me, is a Case grad who is very interested in serving the city of Cleveland and North East Ohio. I’m sure he will be very impressed with your accomplishments as he learns more about them. Richard Medvik Standards and Regulatory Compliance Engineer Swagelok Company • REI is the vehicle that gives concerned Clevelanders access to one another. It is not only the place where conver- sations begin, but an organization providing the resources needed to take the next steps. Our personal experi- ence began with a discussion at REI. That forum planted the seed of an idea, which led to a concept, and began a collaboration. That collaboration developed the RAMTEC proposal which we believe can revitalize the manufac- C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 11
  • 13. turing industry in North East Ohio, and potentially, the United States. As our team works to take the next steps toward making the proposal a reality, we would like to gratefully acknowledge REI’s role as incubator and men- tor. Marybeth Mathews Tom Strbac Dave Watson RAMTEC • REI and CSU’s Center for Economic Development are partnering on two projects. The first project consisted of a partnership between the two university centers and Jack Kleinhenz. The project was undertaken for the Ohio Department of Developnment and Ohio Aerospace Institute. The project was successfully completed in the Spring of 2005. The second project is at its initial stages. REI and CSU’s Center for Economic Development are partnering on work for Cuyahoga County’s Department of Development and the Blue Ribbon Committee. The lead on this project is REI and CSU is a subcontractor to REI. The two centers, along with other universities in Northeast Ohio, submitted two proposals to the Fund for Our Economic Future. The universities were not selected as the lead consultant on these projects. The two centers have different expertise and bring different sets of skills to the projects and clients. The partnership between the two centers works well. Ziona Austrian Director Center for Economic Development Cleveland State University C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 12
  • 14. • REI has done a great job connecting various groups within the region. They have truly been the leader in net- working in NEOhio. NEOSA has worked with the staff at REI on the Future Forum. They are a group of creative thinkers who are able to get a lot done with a very small staff. I believe they have been invaluable to the region and look forward to working with them in the future. James B. Cookinham President Northeast Ohio Software Alliance NEOSA • REI has been a great partner in the work to create a broad network for sustainability in Northeast Ohio. REI regu- larly convenes some of the most innovative people in the region -- bringing new faces to the table and providing a conceptual framework for the transformation of economic development practices. It’s a model for how universi- ties can engage the community. David Beach Executive Director EcoCity Cleveland • REI is a catalyst that helped us understand the potential for libraries to intentionally engage in regional economic development. Substantial civic space, social networks, skilled staff and information resources are already in place--REI helped us understand how to “host the party” rather than wait to be invited! Cathy Monin President Board of Trustees Cleveland Area Metropolitan Library System C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 13
  • 15. • The Center for Regional Economic Issues, under the leadership of Ed Morrison, is a vital strategic partner with the Indiana Humanities Council and IHC-Leadership Indiana™.  Working with 2,000 of Indiana’s top corporate, government, education, foundation, and nonprofit leaders, the Humanities Council is partnering with REI and Purdue University to develop competitive economic strategies, human capital strategies, and shared vision among the public, private, and nonprofit sectors for the Next Indiana.  The Center’s model of Open Source Economic Development and its emphasis on civic networks and dialogue as competitive strategies are truly innovative practical tools that our research shows to be unique in the nation.  IHC and key Indiana leaders specifically sought out REI as one of our most critical strategic partners to help Indiana become more globally competitive. Open Source Economic Development is remaking Indiana’s economic land- scape. Scott Massey , Ph.D. President and CEO Indiana Humanities Council • I am overwhelmed with the willingness of the members of REI to so graciously volunteer their time, energy and talent to help my administration and the citizens of East Cleveland in our critical time of need. My gratitude is beyond measure. I cannot thank REI enough for what they have done and are proposing to do for my city. Their support is truly bringing to reality “a new day in East Cleveland”. Saratha Goggins. Mayor City of East Cleveland C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 14
  • 16. • REI plays a very important “honest broker” function of bringing resources, and people, together around impor- tant and exciting ideas. In this regard, you are unique in the scope of your interests and competence you bring to the table. I think of you as one of Case’s “community outreach” departments in terms of serving as a focal point for economic development and education issues in the community. Thank you for your leadership on these issues. Paul Sears Dean, College of Business Ashland University • Partnering with Ed Morrison and the REI team could not have come at a better time. Our Center for Regional Development was just in the infancy stage, and this partnership allowed us to (a) work with REI on a high-profile project in Indiana and (b) bounce around ideas about our centers, how they can be helpful to their respective uni- versities and how they can be most effective in making a difference in the economic development arena. The lat- ter discussion led to the joint submission of a proposal to the National Outreach and Scholarship Conference at the University of Georgia (October 2005). The proposal has been accepted and we look forward to working with REI on the conference presentation and on other future projects and ventures. REI has a very impressive vision, products and services. We are delighted to have such a close working relationship with Ed and REI. Sam Cordes Co-Director, Center for Regional Development Purdue University C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 15
  • 17. • The Schubert Center for Child Development has been delighted to establish a working relationship with REI on the multitude of issues impacting children in our city and region. This was evident in your recent presentation on the relevance of research on children at Case’s recent Research ShowCase. You and REI have been invaluable in bringing to the University and surrounding community the critical viewpoint that investment in early childhood is an economic development issue. This is a topic that is receiving increasing interest nationally and we are de- lighted to have someone with expertise in this area on the Case campus. The Schubert Center looks forward to continuing and developing work with you. Jill Corbin, Ph.D. Director The Schubert Center for Child Development Case Western Reserve University • “Regionalism” and “economic development” have never been greater topics of conversation or higher public pol- icy priorities than today in Greater Cleveland. REI has brought substance and form and focus to this imperative community-wide dialog. Diverse ideas and opinions on a myriad of critical subjects are invited to REI, dissected by the audience and used to advance our community’s knowledge and momentum in practical and innovative ways. Paul Oyaski Director of Economic Development Cuyahoga County Commission C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 16
  • 18. • A report from Kentucky states that just a 20% substitution of conventional, high pollution imported diesel fuel with clean burning, American made biodiesel will create 10,600 jobs in a region of 4.4 million people. We are do- ing this in Northeastern Ohio, and it started in East Cleveland through the collaboration made possible by Ed Morrison and REI. There is not space enough here to describe the next set of success stories we are creating through these synergistic efforts, but they will redefine and return our region to its full potential. Phil Lane Chief Technology Officer Midwest Biofuels LLC • I am delighted to respond to Ed Morrison’s request for a testimonial about REI and its impact on me and my pro- grams at Case Western Reserve and in the community, like The Intergenerational School. I think REI is a exceed- ingly valuable resource for Case and our community that spurs us on to think creatively and deeply about com- munity and academic networking in service to enhancing the viability of this region. The programs I participated in concerning environmental sustainability, technology, early childhood development intergenerational learning and cognitive science were top notch. Ed and his staff (also to be lauded) attract the key players and their process stimulates people to go to the limits of their creative powers. REALNEO and its open source software compliments the appreciative and inquiring process at REI. I am sure REI is a challenge to some in Cleveland who currently purport to control the economic development space and think in limited ways about entrepreneurship; so it should be and Ed and staff have done that job well. Peter J. Whitehouse M.D.-Ph.D. Director Integrative Studies, Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University University Hospitals of Cleveland C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 17
  • 19. • REI is a treasure and an invaluable resource for the Greater Cleveland region. The value of having nationally recognized experts right in our own neighborhood should not be underestimated or taken for granted. Issues ranging from government structure to regional cooperation to economic and workforce development, I can count on REI to be on the forefront of issues facing our region and economy. In my position, I depend on the re- search and expertise of REI nearly everyday. Hugh B. Shannon Government Service Coordination Manager Cuyahoga County Commission • REI provides the intellectual underpinnings to the practice of open source economic development. The signifi- cance is this is of incalculable value, in the context of the industrial policy-derived solutions practiced in the re- gion by others. The world’s successful regions use IT-empowered networks and their presence is the factor dif- ferentiating regions of growth from others, in the United States. My perspectives are those arising from a near 20-year career in Washington, DC and from having learned the re- gion’s enterprise culture from my father, Allen C. Holmes. Close to home, his legacy is remembered through the Weatherhead School’s annual community service award. As a former chairman of Case and national managing partner of Jones Day, his networking practices imbued those close to him with a core appreciation of their value. Moreover, the commercial and not-for-profit enterprises that I have founded in the past year, rely upon open source technology. Your vision is an asset to the region: Keep up your continued support and encouragement. Peter Holmes Founder, Regional Economic Action Links North East Ohio (REALNEO) http://realneo.us C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 18
  • 20. • REI is a great platform which connects us with regional business and industry leaders on many levels. REI also provides a great window for our interests in bridging the gap between academia and the real world. I hope that REI will continue grow as the important player in NEO to bridge academia and business. Jurgen Faust Chair, T.I.M.E Digital Arts Cleveland Institute of Art • “Open Source Economic Development”, developed and taught by Ed Morrison, is an important tool for Leader- ship Indiana as we move our network of regional leaders to action. Globalization is a big concept that can leave the individual feeling powerless as huge forces wash over the world. REI’s model helps frame a conversation where leaders can determine the action steps that will make their community more competitive. Ed Durkee Director of Leadership Programs Indiana Humanities Council C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 19
  • 21. Open Source Economic Development Model Ed Morrison has developed a new model for regional economic development, Open Source Economic Development. The Open Source model views economies as networks embedded in other networks. The model provides the analytical tools that civic leaders need to build open innovation systems in regional economies. These open innovation systems are also called “clusters”. The Open Source model posits that competitive regional economies need collabora- tions in the following areas: Brainpower • Building brainpower; •Translating brainpower into wealth through entrepreneurship and in- novation networks; •Building quality, connected places to attract and retain talented peo- ple; Purposeful •Promoting the story of the region through effective brands; and Dialogue •Building strong civic habits of purposeful dialogue. Quality, Innovation REI is developing tools to assist civic leaders in implementing this Connected Networks Places model within neighborhoods, communities and regions. In the past year, REI has organized the economic development discussions around this approach in East Cleveland, the Cuyahoga County Commission and Branding the state of Indiana. REI aligns all of its activities with the Open Source model. Morrison distributes the Open Source model under a Creative Commons license. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 20
  • 22. Current REI Initiatives I N I T I AT I V E DESCRIPTION PA RT N E R REI.Tuesday Weekly forum to discuss various aspects of the Various. Currently webcasting REI.Tuesdays to Youngstown. emerging innovation economy in NEO Discussing webcasts with Indiana Humanities Council for the fall. Charleston (SC) Digital Corridor is adopting the model. Making Change A series of semi-annual meetings, radio spots and SBC Foundation and ideastream TV broadcasts that highlight the emerging innova- tion economy in NEO Deliberation Day An on-going series of citizen deliberations on criti- ideastream, MacNeil Lehrer Productions cal issues facing the U.S. economy. Next Delibera- tion Day will be on the Case campus in October. Part of a national network of 16 sites. Community of Minds Monthly forum of new thinking on the emerging Thompson, Hine innovation economy in Northeast Ohio. East Cleveland 2010 A strategy to apply Open Source Economic Devel- City of East Cleveland, The Cleveland Foundation, Cleveland opment model to the challenges of building brain- State University, Kent State University. Immediate focus on power and wealth in East Cleveland. We are improving operational effectiveness of East Cleveland City launching Midwest Biofuels, the first bio-diesel government (CSU taking the lead). Case REI is focused on distribution company in Northeast Ohio. business development. KSU is focused on physical develop- ment. New Energy Roundtable Development of a framework for a regional, na- Swagelok tional, and international dialogue on our energy future. Based on a new framework for conducting orderly technology assessments. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 21
  • 23. I N I T I AT I V E DESCRIPTION PA RT N E R Center for Health and Disease Man- Formation of a cluster of companies involved with Eight companies agement new model of health care: disease management TransTech Development of a cluster of advanced transporta- TransTech, Thompson, Hine tion businesses. First business: Midwest Biofuels. Second business: Pilot launch of fleet of electric hybrid commuter vehicles. Ramtech Development of a consortium (“cluster”) of small Fifteen small component manufacturers in NEO, Thompson, component manufacturers to accelerate automa- Hine tion and improve training. Indiana Humanities Council Advisory and speaking engagement for Leader- Indiana Humanities Council ship Indiana, an initiative of the Indiana Humani- ties Council Purdue Center for Regional Develop- Partnership with the new Center for Regional De- Purdue Center for Regional Economic Development ment velopment at Purdue to develop practical tools for civic leaders to implement the Open Source Eco- nomic Development model Universities Collaborative Collaboration of colleges and universities across Case, Cleveland State, Kent State, University of Akron, Lorain Noertheast Ohio to provide the infrastructure to County Community College, Youngstown State build knowledge-based clusters Regional Leadership Task Force Partnership with 14 leadership groups across Youngstown State Northeast Ohio to implement Region Day and build a collaborative network of regional leaders Libraries in economic development Reframing the role of the public library system in Cuyahoga Area Metropolitan Library System (CAMLS), East supporting civic dialogue in economic develop- Cleveland Public Library ment C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 22
  • 24. I N I T I AT I V E DESCRIPTION PA RT N E R Green City Blue Lake Network Establish a network of organizations across North- EcoCity Cleveland east Ohio that are committed to establishing the region as a global leader in sustainable develop- ment Early Child Care and Economic Devel- Emerging partnership to establish Case as a na- The Schubert Center for Child Development, Center on Urban opment tional leader in an emerging area of economic de- Poverty and Social Change velopment: Early child care International student initiative Development of stronger linkages among interna- NOCHE, Baldwin Wallace College tional students in Northeast Ohio to improve ca- reer and business development opportunities Cuyahoga County Commission Strate- Develop strategic framework for the Cuyahoga Cuyahoga County Commission, Cleveland State University gic Action Plan for Economic Develop- County Commission’s economic development ment budget C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 23
  • 25. REI.Tuesdays C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 24
  • 26. REI.Tuesdays C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 25
  • 27. REI.Tuesdays C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 26
  • 28. REI.Tuesdays C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 27
  • 29. REI.Tuesdays C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 28
  • 30. Alignment of REI with Open Source Economic Development I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N T R E P R E N E U R- Q U A L I T Y, C O N- D I A L O G U E A N D I N- I N I T I AT I V E BRAINPOWER SHIP NECTED PLACES BRANDING CLUSION REI.Tuesday Using principles of Appreciate Inquiry, these forums explore different topics in each of these areas Making Change Making Change also The primary focal point of the Making Change series has The Making Change series develops themes been on innovation and globalization is also helpful in rebrand- relating to early ing the region and estab- childhood develop- lishing Case’s thought ment and economic leadership in regional eco- development nomic development Deliberation The Deliberation Day in October 2005 will focus on Deliberation Day links the Deliberation Day is a proc- Day the global impacts on the Northeast Ohio economy region and Case to ess of deliberative discus- MacNeił/Lehrer Produc- sion, close to Appreciative tions Inquiry Community of These sessions highlight These sessions provide Minds new business develop- another effort to change ment opportunities emerg- the regional conversation ing in Northeast Ohio’s away from “The Quiet economy Crisis” East Cleveland Focus on building new businesses in an inner city location, similar to Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (http://www.icic.org), the East 2010 Cleveland 2010 project is using the Open Source model as a strategic map for different initiatives C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 29
  • 31. I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N T R E P R E N E U R- Q U A L I T Y, C O N- D I A L O G U E A N D I N- I N I T I AT I V E BRAINPOWER SHIP NECTED PLACES BRANDING CLUSION New Energy By framing the issue of our energy future in terms of an on-going, global dialogue, the New Energy Roundta- Vision of developing a Roundtable ble touches all dimensions of the Open Source model global dialogue on energy technology assessments RAMTEC By developing a consortium (“cluster”) of small component manufacturers to accelerate automation, improve training and compete effec- tively against low cost manufacturing bases, this initiative touches on all dimensions of the Open Source model TransTech By developing a consortium (“cluster”) of advanced transportation businesses, this initiative touches on all dimensions of the Open Source model Indiana Hu- Development of a new model for regional economic development, based on Open Source Economic Development and Appreciative Inquiry manities Coun- cil Purdue Center Development of practical tools for Open Source Economic Development and Appreciative Inquiry for Regional Development Universities Collaboration of colleges and universities across Northeast Ohio to provide the infrastructure to build knowledge-based clusters Collaborative Center for A proposal that has emerged from REI’s research into evolving models of health care among self-insured companies Health and Dis- REI has identified an emerging high growth cluster in NEO ease Manage- ment Libraries in eco- Reframing the role of the public library system in supporting all dimensions of the Open Source model nomic devel- opment C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 30
  • 32. I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N T R E P R E N E U R- Q U A L I T Y, C O N- D I A L O G U E A N D I N- I N I T I AT I V E BRAINPOWER SHIP NECTED PLACES BRANDING CLUSION Green City Blue Establish a network of organizations across Northeast Lake Network Ohio that are committed to establishing the region as a global leader in sustainable development Early Child Care Emerging partner- Establish a national lead- and Economic ship to establish Case ership position for Cuya- Development as a national leader hoga County and the re- in an emerging area gion of economic devel- opment: Early child care Economic Land- Partnership with 14 lead- scape project ership groups across Regional Lead- Northeast Ohio to imple- ership Task ment Region Day and Force build a collaborative net- work of regional leaders International Development of stronger linkages among international students in Northeast Ohio to improve career and student initia- business development opportunities tive C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 31
  • 33. I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N T R E P R E N E U R- Q U A L I T Y, C O N- D I A L O G U E A N D I N- I N I T I AT I V E BRAINPOWER SHIP NECTED PLACES BRANDING CLUSION Cuyahoga Addresses the issue Addresses the issue of Addresses the issue of Addresses the issue of Creates a new forum for County Com- of how Cuyahoga how Cuyahoga County how Cuyahoga County how Cuyahoga County inclusion in developing mission Strate- County can expand build open, flexible net- can compete in a global can become a national economic strategies for gic Action Plan its emerging cluster works of innovative busi- economy leader in sustainable de- Northeast Ohio for Economic of fast growth disease nesses velopment Development management compa- nies C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 32
  • 34. Alignment of REI Initiatives with University Strategy UNIVERSITY MISSION: C R E AT E A C U LT U R E O F T R A N S F O R M A- UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND I N I T I AT I V E TION VA L U E S LEARNING RESEARCH S E RV I C E REI.Tuesday Making Change These activities in- Deliberation Day volve visitors com- Community of ing to campus and Minds experiencing a new These activities In these activities, REI is build- type of learning promote university ing Case’s reputation for civic East Cleveland through doing values, especially leadership by translating the 2010 These activities are partnership and “think globally, act locally” New Energy designed following social responsibility REI is developing a new maxim into practice Roundtable the principles of framework for technol- Appreciative In- ogy assessments quiry Policy development with national and global im- pact C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 33
  • 35. UNIVERSITY MISSION: C R E AT E A C U LT U R E O F T R A N S F O R M A- UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND I N I T I AT I V E TION VA L U E S LEARNING RESEARCH S E RV I C E Center for Health REI is building new REI is promoting a new and Disease tools to apply the theory model of “predict and Management of clusters prevent” health care: Policy development with Integration of theory national and global im- In these initiatives, and practice pact REI is building new TransTech clusters of innova- By working to build new clus- tive companies in ters of innovative businesses in RAMTEC REI is developing the Northeast Ohio, REI is promot- Northeast Ohio first consortium of com- ing Case’s civic leadership Excellence and in- ponent suppliers dedi- novation cated to open systems of automation and training Policy development with national and global im- pact C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 34
  • 36. UNIVERSITY MISSION: C R E AT E A C U LT U R E O F T R A N S F O R M A- UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND I N I T I AT I V E TION VA L U E S LEARNING RESEARCH S E RV I C E Indiana Humani- In promoting partnerships with ties Council leading institutions in Indiana, REI is building Case’s national Purdue Center With these activities, leadership role in regional eco- for Regional De- REI is building net- nomic development velopment works with outside Universities Col- organizations that REI promotes the vision that laborative promote values of economic transformation will partnership and come through open networks of social responsibility collaboration with colleges and universities in the middle of these networks With this vision, REI is project- ing Case’s civic leadership Regional Leader- Partnership and By supporting the first consor- ship Task Force social responsibility tium of leadership groups, REI is promoting Case’s civic lead- ership C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 35
  • 37. UNIVERSITY MISSION: C R E AT E A C U LT U R E O F T R A N S F O R M A- UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND I N I T I AT I V E TION VA L U E S LEARNING RESEARCH S E RV I C E Libraries in eco- By outlining the evolving role of nomic develop- Partnership and public libraries in the knowl- ment social responsibility edge economy, REI is promoting Case’s civic leadership Green City Blue Partnership and REI is promoting the vision of Lake Network social responsibility Northeast Ohio as a global leader of sustainable develop- ment with colleges and univer- sities as leaders in this strategy Early Child Care Excellence and in- Integration of theory In this initiative, REI is and Economic novation and practice combining Case’s na- Development tional recognition in early child research and eco- nomic development Policy development with national and global im- pact C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 36
  • 38. UNIVERSITY MISSION: C R E AT E A C U LT U R E O F T R A N S F O R M A- UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND I N I T I AT I V E TION VA L U E S LEARNING RESEARCH S E RV I C E International stu- Mentorship and By working with the region’s dent initiative diversity international students, REI is translating the “think globally, act locally” into specific initia- tives Cuyahoga Partnership and By working with the County County Commis- social responsibility Commission, REI is translating sion Strategic the “think globally, act locally” Action Plan for into specific initiatives Economic Devel- opment C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 37
  • 39. Alignment of REI Initiatives with Weatherhead Strategy I N I T I AT I V E H E A LT H C A R E I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N- G L O B A L I Z AT I O N B AW B TREPRENEURSHIP REI.Tuesday Using principles of Appreciate Inquiry, these forums explore different topics in each of these areas Making Change The primary focal point of the Making Change series has been on innovation and globalization Deliberation Day The Deliberation Day in October Deliberation Day is a process of 2005 will focus on the global im- deliberative discussion, close to pacts on the Northeast Ohio Appreciative Inquiry economy Community of These sessions highlight new Minds business development opportu- nities emerging in Northeast Ohio’s economy East Cleveland 2010 Focus on building new busi- nesses in an inner city location, similar to Initiative for a Com- petitive Inner City (http://www.icic.org) New Energy Round- Vision of developing a global dialogue on energy technology assess- table ments RAMTEC Development of a consortium (“cluster”) of small component manu- facturers to accelerate automation, improve training and compete effectively against low cost manufacturing bases C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 38
  • 40. I N I T I AT I V E H E A LT H C A R E I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N- G L O B A L I Z AT I O N B AW B TREPRENEURSHIP TransTech Development of a cluster of advanced transportation businesses. First business: Midwest Biofuels. Second business: Pilot launch of fleet of electric hybrid commuter vehicles. Indiana Humanities Development of a new model for regional economic development, based on Open Source Economic De- Council velopment and Appreciative Inquiry Purdue Center for Development of practical tools for Open Source Economic Development and Appreciative Inquiry Regional Develop- ment Universities Collabo- Collaboration of colleges and rative universities across Northeast Ohio to provide the infrastruc- ture to build knowledge-based clusters Center for Health A proposal that has emerged from REI’s research into evolving and Disease Man- models of health care among self-insured companies agement REI has identified an emerging high growth cluster in NEO Libraries in eco- Reframing the role of the public nomic development library system in supporting civic dialogue in economic de- velopment C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 39
  • 41. I N I T I AT I V E H E A LT H C A R E I N N O VAT I O N A N D E N- G L O B A L I Z AT I O N B AW B TREPRENEURSHIP Green City Blue Lake Establish a network of organiza- Network tions across Northeast Ohio that are committed to establishing the region as a global leader in sus- tainable development Early Child Care and Emerging partnership to estab- Economic Develop- lish Case as a national leader in ment an emerging area of economic development: Early child care Economic Landscape Partnership with 14 leadership project Regional groups across Northeast Ohio to Leadership Task implement Region Day and build Force a collaborative network of re- gional leaders International student Development of stronger link- initiative ages among international stu- dents in Northeast Ohio to im- prove career and business devel- opment opportunities Cuyahoga County Addresses the issue of Addresses the issue of how Addresses the issue of how Addresses the issue of how Commission Strate- how Cuyahoga County Cuyahoga County build open, Cuyahoga County can compete Cuyahoga County can become a gic Action Plan for can expand its emerging flexible networks of innovative in a global economy national leader in sustainable Economic Develop- cluster of fast growth dis- businesses development ment ease management compa- nies C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 40
  • 42. APPENDIX: Estimating the Marketing Value of REI to Case The marketing value to Case of REI is well over $300,000: AUDIENCE E S T I M AT E D VA L U E COMMENTS REI.Tuesdays Regional 90,000 1,800 impressions per year at $50 per impression Making Change: Reinventing Our Economy Regional 100,000 20 per year at $5,000 per spot radio spots Making Change: Reinventing Our Economy Regional 30,000 1 per year at $30,000 TV shows Deliberation Day: PBS MacNeil Lehrer National 10,000 1 mention in a national broadcast Deliberation Day: PBS MacNeil Lehrer Regional 50,000 1 hour show per year Indiana Regional Leadership Summits Indiana 48,000 960 civic leaders in regional summits at $50 per impression Indiana State Leadership Summit Indiana 20,000 400 civic leaders at state summit at $50 per impression Estimated Total Value to Case $348,000 C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 41
  • 43. APPENDIX: The University Strategy University Vision The University vision is captured in the phrase: “Case Western Reserve University strives to be the most powerful learn- ing environment in the world”. The University translates this vision into the following key dimensions: • Responsible risk-taking • Aspirations for national and global leadership • Experiential learning • Preparing morally and socially responsible life-long learners • Productive partnerships with other outstanding institutions • A diverse, challenging, supportive, entrepreneurial, and interdisciplinary environment of openness, respect, ac- countability, and academic freedom C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 42
  • 44. University Mission and Values The University mission and values are expressed as follows. (Emphasis added to those phrases that connect to REI’s ac- tivities.) • Case Western Reserve University strives to be the most powerful learning environment in the world. We con- stantly challenge ourselves to create a culture of transformation so engaging that students, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, and even visitors to campus become passionate about moving beyond themselves to express creativity, to pursue innovation and discovery, and to serve humanity. • As a university guided in all of its labors by values defined and sustained by constant moral discourse, we hold ourselves accountable at every level of the institution for practicing our values of integrity and respect, excellence and innovation, mentorship and diversity, academic freedom and entrepreneurship, partnership and social re- sponsibility, efficiency and effectiveness, and continuous personal and institutional improvement. • As an educational institution dedicated to leadership in teaching and learning, we seek to transform all learners – faculty and staff as well as students – and support their personal growth and mentorship throughout their lives. We seek to lead the nation as the research university where the challenges of creating new knowledge support the values of a liberal education, where rigorous theory and practical, real-world experiences come together. • As a research institution dedicated to leadership in scholarly investigation, we seek to transform knowledge it- self, focusing resources into those areas of research and scholarship where we can have the greatest national and global impact. In addition to research targeted to specific ends, we also accept our responsibility – unique to re- search universities – to create and disseminate knowledge for its own sake, and we promote a culture of inquiry marked by rigor, creativity, curiosity, innovation, respect, sensitivity, open communication of ideas, and lifelong learning. • As a service-oriented institution dedicated to civic leadership, we seek individually and collectively to trans- form society by preparing our students to improve the human condition and by directing the benefits of discovery toward a better society. Our uniquely transforming environment is not limited to the university’s own class- rooms, laboratories, libraries, residence halls, and athletic fields, but includes partnerships with many other great institutions, including those concentrated in University Circle, Greater Cleveland, Northeast Ohio, and be- yond. To “think globally, act locally,” we build these partnerships in the service of national and international C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 43
  • 45. leadership, believing that our ability to improve the human condition throughout the world should begin within our own community. • Case Western Reserve University strives to create a unique synergy among our education, research, and service missions, which we view as inseparable. Organizationally, this means that we eliminate unnecessary bureaucracy, striving to be the most efficiently run research university in the world in order to keep our focus on productivity and maximize opportunities for inter-departmental, inter-school, and inter-institutional collaboration. Educa- tionally, this means that student experiences in cultural institutions, clinics, social service agencies, or industry are not viewed as “extra-curricular,” but combine with the demands and rigors of academic theory to create the transforming learning experience that is a Case Western Reserve education. Strategic Activities The University will achieve its vision through building the following dimensions of the University: Breakthrough research and education: • Research and professional programs: Build on traditional strengths; focus on quality and recognition; provide faculty, graduate student and post-doctoral support; make New Vision investments. • Undergraduate Program: New liberal learning; CAS investment; SAGES; experiential education and rigorous scholarship. • Academic Medical Center: Premier educational and research programs; Case Research Institute; Healthy Cleve- land; synergistic affiliations with all Cleveland hospitals. Compelling Excellence: • Institutional Culture and Values: Excellence and leadership; Cleveland partnerships; empowerment; account- ability; entrepreneurship; innovation; responsible risk-taking; emphasis on technology transfer, diversity, effi- ciency. • Campus Environment: Capacity and quality space for research, education and campus life; Master Plan; College Town; Campus Center; North Residential Village; enhanced University Circle Partnerships; service orientation. C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 44
  • 46. • Resources: Outstanding faculty, students, staff, alumni, trustees and community partners; University advance- ment through development, alumni affairs, marketing, communications, and government support; Trustee sup- port and advocacy; Corporate support and royalties; Endowment growth. APPENDIX: The Emerging Weatherhead Strategy To achieve the new vision of “One Weatherhead”, the school will engage in the following activities: • Strengthening the core disciplines of the school; • Broadening the appeal of degree and non-degree programs; and • Recommitting to a culture of excellence and merit. To strengthen the core disciplines of the school, Weatherhead will focus on globalization and new methods for teaching managers. To broaden the appeal of degree and non-degree programs, the Weatherhead strategy is focused on 1) strengthening un- dergraduate programs; 2) improving the program mix or graduate degree programs; 3) expanding the appeal of Executive Education; and 3) establishing four “schools within the school”: • The Global Business Studies Institute • Entrepreneurship and Innovation • Business as an Agent World Benefit • Health and Bioscience C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 45
  • 47. To commit to a culture of excellence and merit, the school will: • Establish a new faculty merit review • Promote values of openness and fairness • Promote multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to education and research C a s e C e n t e r f o r R e g i o n a l E c o n o m i c I s s u e s 46