Impact of Social Media on News #SMING14

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Related infographic at https://www.slideshare.net/ING/infographic-impact-of-social-media-on-news-sming14-36054221 and http://www.ing.com/sming14

ING has performed an international study into the impact of social media on the activities of PR professionals & journalists and the way social media has influenced the news and the way news is disseminated.

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Impact of Social Media on News #SMING14

  1. 1. #SMING14 IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON NEWS AN INTERNATIONAL STUDY INTO THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON THE ACTIVITIES OF PR PROFESSIONALS & JOURNALISTS, NEWS & NEWS DISSEMINATION
  2. 2. 2 ABOUTTHIS STUDY WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT? KEY TERMS Both news and the way in which it is disseminated have been strongly influenced by social media. Social media have changed the way PR professionals and journalists operate. Last year ING conducted a study into the role of social media in PR and journalism. It concluded that social media have revolutionised the media landscape. This year the study into the role of social media among PR professionals and journalists has been repeated with the aim of gaining an insight into the impact of social media on the activities of PR professionals and journalists and how they have influenced the news and the way news is disseminated. Both Dutch and international PR professionals and journalists were involved in the study in order to ascertain to what extent there are differences in the way countries use and make use of social media. The report contains various terms, which are explained below:This report provides an insight into the following questions: To what extent are social media seen as reliable? To what extent is public opinion via social media used in publishing news? To what extent do journalists undertake fact-checking and crowd-checking? To what extent do journalists act differently in traditional media and social media? To what extent do Dutch PR professionals use social media differently from international PR professionals? What are the expectations of PR professionals and journalists with regard to social media? The ‘Journalists’ group comprises journalists, editors and bloggers/experts who write about a specific subject. Where the term journalists is used, it refers to both Dutch and international respondents, unless stated otherwise. The ‘PR professionals’ group comprises PR professio- nals, spokespeople and corporate communication pro- fessionals. Where the term PR professionals is used, it refers to both Dutch and international respondents, unless stated otherwise. Fact-checking is defined as the checking of facts, for example by applying the principle of hearing both sides of the argument. Crowd-checking means using public opinion to establish whether or not something is true. 1 5 2 3 4 6 Journalists PR professionals Fact- & Crowd Checking INTRODUCTION
  3. 3. 3 THE 5 MAIN INSIGHTS AT A GLANCE One-third of journalists said social media posts are not a reliable source of information. Despite this half of journalists said social media were their main source of information. Remarkably, half of journalists said they consider con- sumer opinion to be more reliable than a statement by an organisation. Journalists use social media to find out what people are talking about and when writing articles, but do not always check whether public opinion is based on fact. Fact-checking has become less thorough; ‘publish first, correct if necessary’ is the order of the day. Only one- fifth of journalists always check their facts before publi- shing. Almost half of journalists said they published as quickly as possible with most of what they put out and correct later if necessary. PR professionals also noted that since the arrival of social media journalists are get- ting in contact less frequently to check facts. Journalists (60%) said they feel less bound by journa- listic rules on social media than with traditional media such as a newspaper article. They act differently on social media than in traditional media, sharing their personal opinion more openly on social media. This despite the fact that journalists are seen as being objective and reporters of news facts relating to events of general importance. 1 5 2 3 4 SUMMARY Dutch PR professionals are lagging behind their interna- tional counterparts. In the Netherlands the focus lies on sending out news, while internationally more attention is devoted to dialogue and direct contact with journalists and consumers via social media. 5MAIN INSIGHTS
  4. 4. 4 Journalists expect less fact-checking to be done in the future. Conversely the role of crowd-checking, whereby the public’s opinion is used and accepted as being true, will grow in importance. User-generated content, such as tweets and pictures or videos from bystanders, is already widely used in news and is expected to grow further. Dutch PR professionals will stage a catch-up as they reduce their focus on sending out releases and concen- trate more on engaging in dialogue and building relations. 1 2 3 THE 5 MAIN EXPECTATIONS AT A GLANCE SUMMARY 5 Journalists expect journalism to be driven by clicks and views more than by content. 54 PR professionals expect their contact with consumers to intensify with increasingly less involvement of journalists, now that they have the ability to approach the target group directly and engage in dialogue with them. EXPECTATIONS
  5. 5. 5 53% 40% PR professionals RELIABILITY OF SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS SOCIAL MEDIA ARE WIDELY USED FOR PUBLICATIONS, DESPITE THEIR LOW DEGREE OF RELIABILITY 40% of journalists consider social media posts to be reliable. PR professionals judge social media to be somewhat more reliable, with 53% in this group saying they agree with the statement. It is noteworthy that social media posts are the most important source of information for 50% of journalists despite their relatively low reliability. Moreover 59% of journalists said public opinion on social media played an important role in what they publish. 51% of PR professionals said news is becoming less re- liable because fact-checking has declined as a result of social media. CHAPTER 1 51% 16% 23% Social media posts are a reliable source of information Journalism Percentage of respondents who agreed with this statement PR Social media make news less reliable because journalists do less/no fact-checking Agree Disagree Neutral
  6. 6. 6 It is noteworthy that 50% of journalists consider consumer opinion to be more reliable than a statement by an orga- nisation. 19% of journalists do not see consumer opinion as being more reliable. 68% of journalists use social media to find out what people are talking about. Nearly three-quarters of journalists stated that the impact of public opinion on publications has increased as a result of social media. 50% 31% 19% Journalists Journalists RELIABILITY OF SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS 50% OF JOURNALISTS CONSIDER CONSUMER OPINION MORE RELIABLE THAN A STATEMENT BY AN ORGANISATION CHAPTER 1 73% 19% 8% Agree Disagree Neutral Agree Disagree Neutral I consider consumer opinion on social media more reliable than a statement by an organisation The impact of public opinion on publications has increased as a result of social media
  7. 7. 7 45% of journalists put out 60% to 100% of what they publish as soon as possible – without checking facts – and correct later if necessary. Only 20% always check the facts before publishing. 52% of PR professionals said that since the arrival of social media journalists get in contact less frequently to check facts. FACT & CROWD CHECKING ‘PUBLISH FIRST, CORRECT IF NECESSARY’ IS THE ORDER OF THE DAY 45% 14% 21% 20% Journalists Journalists said checks as to whether public opinion is correct are carried out; 53% of journalists said they do so with 60-100% of what they publish. 17% of journalists said they never check whether public opinion is true. HALF OF JOURNALISTS CHECK WHETHER PUBLIC OPINION ON SOCIAL MEDIA IS BASED ON FACT 53% 16% 15% 17% Journalists CHAPTER 2 For a minority of publications (1 - 39%) Never (0%) For around half of publications (40 - 59%) For most publications (60 - 100%) For a minority of publications (1 - 39%) Never (0%) For around half of publications (40 - 59%) For most publications (60 - 100%) I publish as soon as possible and correct later I check whether public opinion is correct
  8. 8. 8 CHAPTER 3 Journalists Journalists HOW JOURNALISTS ACT ON SOCIAL MEDIA JOURNALISTS FEEL LESS BOUND BY JOURNALISTIC RULES ON SOCIAL MEDIA As many as 60% of journalists agreed with the statement ‘On social media I am less bound by journalistic rules than in traditional media’. Journalists act differently on social media from when they report through traditional news channels. 67% of journa- lists said they express themselves differently on social media. 59% of journalists said they share their personal opinion more openly via social media. 17% 66%17% Journalists Agree Disagree Neutral Agree Disagree Neutral On social media I am less bound by journalistic rules than in traditional media I express myself differently on social media than in traditional media 22% 18% 60%
  9. 9. 9 CHAPTER 4 Dutch PR professionals attach significantly more impor- tance to social media for PR purposes than international PR professionals. 86% of Dutch respondents said that PR can no longer function without social media, compared to 71% in the United States and 79% in the United Kingdom. However, in the Netherlands social media receive less atten- tion within the PR media mix than in other countries. 19% of Dutch PR professionals devote more attention to social media than to other media. In the United Kingdom and the United States social media receives respectively more attention with 65% and 45% of the PR professionals. DUTCH PR PROFESSIONALS ARE LAGGING BEHIND THE UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM DUTCH VS. INTERNATIONAL PR PROFESSIONALS 45% 48% 65% 28% 7% 7% 11% 18%19% 63% 51% 38% NL INT 76% 86% 71% 79% NL INT PR professionals PR can no longer function without social media Percentage of respondents who agreed with this statement What is the share of social media within the PR mix compared to traditional resources? Greater Equal Smaller US UK US UK
  10. 10. 10 CHAPTER 4 DUTCH PR PROFESSIONALS ENGAGE LESS WITH JOURNALISTS AND CONSUMERS DUTCH VS. INTERNATIONAL PR PROFESSIONALS PR professionals In the Netherlands 24% of PR professionals talk to jour- nalists on a daily basis, compared to 63% in the United States. In the UK almost three-quarters of PR professio- nals (72%) have daily talks. It is noteworthy that PR professionals in all countries engage in dialogue with consumers more often than with journalists. Dutch PR professionals engage less with consumers com- pared to other countries. 45% of Dutch PR professionals engage with consumers on a daily basis, compared to 73% in the US and 81% in the UK. PR professionals 45% 80% 78% 91% 73% 87% 81% 93% NL INT PR professionals 24% 85% 65% 92% 63% 87% 72% 96% NL INT I engage with journalists via social media Weekly Daily Daily yeeklW I engage directly with consumers via social media US US UK UK
  11. 11. 11 CHAPTER 4 DIALOGUE VIA SOCIAL MEDIA STRENGTHENS RELATIONS WITH JOURNALISTS DUTCH VS. INTERNATIONAL PR PROFESSIONALS PR professionals The frequency with which PR professionals engage with media relations would appear to determine the degree to which ties with journalists have strengthened. PR professionals in the United States and the United King- dom engage with journalists more frequently and experience improved relations with this target group more strongly (65% and 72%, respectively) than Dutch PR professionals (49%). PR professionals 65% 72% 49% 66% NL INT Social media have strengthened my relations with journalists Percentage of respondents who agreed with this statement US UK
  12. 12. 12 Both journalists and PR professionals are convinced that the role of social media within their industry will continue to grow; 85% of PR professionals and 80% of journalists agreed with this statement. PR 80% 0 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 85% EXPECTATIONS ROLE OF SOCIAL MEDIA TO KEEP ON GROWING CHAPTER 5 PR professionals Journalists Journalism Percentage of respondents who agreed with this statement The role of social media within journalism, PR, corporate communications and crisis management will only increase
  13. 13. 13 Is the ‘real’ journalist set to become a gatekeeper & research journalist? In 2014 anyone can be a journalist or pretend to be one. Moreover social media enable far more rapid dissemi- nation of news, regardless of whether it is true or not. Although this discussion has been ongoing for quite some time, expectations are that the ‘real’ (professional) journa- list will indeed increasingly assume the role of gatekeeper: someone who selects the nuggets, who is able to filter out the news that really matters, who checks the facts and shares reliable news. It is also expected that journalists will increasingly develop in the direction of research jour- nalism. These journalists are less focused on spreading scoops and more on providing background information. Is journalism more driven by clicks and views? Are clicks and views becoming more important than quality and content? One journalist called it ‘click bait journalism’ whereby the number of views an article gets – whether or not because of the advertising revenue – is more important than for example achieving knowledge of developments or raising awareness of a certain social issue. Which could lead to news becoming more sensation-driven with a lesser focus on quality and content. More user-generated content? Tweets are already regularly cited in articles or headlines, and pictures and videos made by bystanders are used for news items. Expectations are that user-generated content as input for news will continue to increase in the future (73%). Around half of respondents believe that the role of tools such as Scoopshot will become more important in journalism, with user-generated content being purchased, for example for use in news articles. Less fact-checking, more crowd-checking? This study has already established that fact-checking is no longer universal practice and that the speed of social me- dia creates a preference for ‘publish first, correct if neces- sary’. 44% of journalists expect to see a further decline in fact-checking in the future. Crowd-checking, conversely, whereby the public’s opinion is used and accepted as fact, will grow in importance, said 55%. WHAT DO JOURNALISTS EXPECT? CHAPTER 5PR professionals EXPECTATIONS
  14. 14. 14 Will increasing numbers of pr professionals be active on social media? PR professionals expect an increasing number of colleagues to be active on social media, with 90% of respondents agreeing with this statement. The industry has a growing need for people with knowledge and experience of social media. In addition to PR professionals and spokespeople expectations are that employees will play a bigger role in PR. Not everyone views this as a positive development, as it means PR departments will have less control over their message. Moreover some journalists said that it is getting harder to find the right person within an organisation. Greater attention to social media & online resources within the pr mix? 83% of PR professionals expect organisations to make more use of online news and pressrooms to disseminate news. In principle anything can be shared in these online newsrooms that facilitates a journalist in writing or developing news articles, think for example of images, infographics, video material, etc. As a result 79% of respondents expect to need a larger budget for the development of PR resources. Closer contact with consumers? One of the conclusions of last year’s study was that the PR model has changed. PR professionals expect the in- volvement of journalists to diminish given that they now have the ability to approach the target group directly and engage with them. This trend would appear to be happe- ning already, given that PR professionals say they are more likely to engage with consumers than with journalists. Less sending, more dialogue? Many PR professionals, especially in the Netherlands, are focusing on using social media to expand their reach. Expectations are that the focus will indeed shift to engaging in permanent dialogue and building relations, rather than simply sending out messages to various target groups. WHAT DO PR PROFESSIONALS EXPECT? CHAPTER 5PR professionals PR expectations EXPECTATIONS
  15. 15. 15 85% of PR professionals use social media on a daily basis. The Dutch are most active, with 90% of respondents saying they use social media every day. Like journalists, PR professionals are active on social media throughout the day, mainly from 8:30 am to 8:00 pm. Activity levels are lower in late evenings and early mornings. 78% of PR professionals consider social media to be important to the performance of their daily work. 55% of PR professionals are unable to perform their duties without social media. A quarter of respondents said they can work without social media. 81% of PR professionals believe that PR can no longer operate without social media. 64% of PR professionals consider social media to be more superficial, with traditional media offering more scope for depth. 81% of PR professionals consider that social media have a more rapid impact than traditional media. 56% of PR professionals consider that social media have reduced the importance of traditional media. 56%consider that traditional media is reduced in its importance PR professionals are active on social media throughout the day OTHER FACTS & FIGURES PR PROFESSIONALS & SOCIAL MEDIA CHAPTER 6PR professionals 2 am 6 am 10 am 2 pm 6 pm 10 pm 0 am 4 am 8 am 12 pm 4 pm 8 pm 0 pm high activity low activity
  16. 16. 16 Social media have a positive impact on reach, with 83% of PR professionals reporting a strong increase in reach as a result of using social media for PR purposes. Around half (49%) consider that the quality of the reach has improved. Twitter (79%) and Facebook (71%) are used the most for the dissemination of news. 51% use a social media release for this, while 36% use an online newsroom. 66% of PR professionals consider social media to be ideal for contacting journalists. 58% of PR professionals use social media on a weekly basis to maintain relations with relevant stakeholders. 72% of PR professionals measure the impact of their social media activities on a weekly basis (such as buzz volume, traffic, etc.), 12% never measure the impact. 35% of organisations actively monitor 24/7 what is being said about a brand in order to be able to respond. At 34% monitoring takes place during office hours, with 19% of organisations saying they monitor occasionally and 2% only doing so in crisis situations. Monitoring the buzz surrounding a brand is mainly the pro- vince of the Communication department (58%), followed by Marketing (30%) and Webcare (24%). 58% 30%MARKETING 24%WEBCARE 83% 49% Monitoring the buzz surrounding a brand A strong increase in reach and in quality PR PROFESSIONALS & SOCIAL MEDIA CHAPTER 6PR professionals increase in reach increase in quality COMMUNICATION OTHER FACTS & FIGURES
  17. 17. 17 78% of journalists use social media on a daily basis. The Dutch are most active, with 87% of respondents saying they use social media every day. Twitter (90%), Facebook (81%) and LinkedIn (64%) are used most for business. Like PR professionals, journalists are active on social media throughout the day, mainly from 8:30 am to 8:00 pm. Activity levels are lower in late evenings and early mornings. 72% of journalists consider social media to be important to the performance of their daily work. 56% of journalists are no longer able to perform their duties without social media. A quarter of journalists said they are able to work without social media. 68% of journalists believe that journalism can no longer operate without social media. 64% of journalists consider social media to be more superficial, with traditional media offering more scope for depth. 74% of journalists consider that social media have a more rapid impact than traditional media. Journalists are making more active use of social media to pressure organisations or to raise issues. Last year 43% of journalists used social media for these purposes, in 2014 this has risen to 57%. 64% 56% are no longer able to perform their duties without social media consider social media to be more superficial, with traditional media offering more scope for depth JOURNALISTS & SOCIAL MEDIA CHAPTER 6Journalists OTHER FACTS & FIGURES
  18. 18. 18 51% of journalists consider that social media have reduced the importance of traditional media. 64% of journalists believe that social media have given them greater influence. 62% of journalists consider that the quality of the reach has improved. 73% of journalists approach the target group with publica- tions on a weekly basis. 48% use social media to draw attention to 60 to 100% of their publications over longer periods of time. 57% of journalists consider social media to be ideal for contacting PR professionals. 63% of journalists use social media on a weekly basis to maintain relations with relevant stakeholders. 59% are in weekly contact with employees and/or board members of organisations. 65% 16% 65% of journalists measure the impact of their social media activities on a weekly basis (such as buzz volume, traffic, etc.), 16% never measure the impact. 51%consider that the importance of traditional media is reduced measure the impact on a weekly basis never measure the impact JOURNALISTS & SOCIAL MEDIA CHAPTER 6Journalists OTHER FACTS & FIGURES
  19. 19. 19 +APPENDIX
  20. 20. 20 About this study This study was conducted in March and April 2014 by Social Embassy on behalf of ING Netherlands. The purpose of the study was to gain an insight into the impact of social media on the activities of PR professionals and journalists and the way they influence the news and the way news is disseminated. Survey PR professionals, spokespeople and corporate communica- tions professionals as well as journalists, editors and blog- gers from around the world participated in an online survey which involved answering closed questions and responding to statements. They were questioned about such things as the role of social media in their field of work, how they use social media and their attitude towards certain develop- ments in their industry. Participants in the study were also given the opportunity to give their view on future trends and developments. SCOPE HOW WAS THE STUDY CONDUCTED? + Panel A total of 186 PR professionals participated in the study, of whom 100 from the Netherlands and 86 from other coun- tries. Thirty of the international PR professionals were from the United States (US) and 42 from the United Kingdom (UK). The other international respondents were from various other European countries. In addition 165 journalists took part in the study, with 66 being from the Netherlands and 99 from other countries. Of the international journalists 42 were from the US and 37 from the UK. The other international respondents were from various other European countries.
  21. 21. 21 MARTIN KLOOS martin@socialembassy.nl @martinkloos +31 (0) 6 549 844 13 HAROLD REUSKEN harold.reusken@ing.nl @haroldreusken +31 (0) 6 549 844 13 CONTACT INFORMATION FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: +

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