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MARCO TEÓRICO DE PISA_SEMINARIO DEL INEE EN COMILLAS(CANTABRIA)
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MARCO TEÓRICO DE PISA_SEMINARIO DEL INEE EN COMILLAS(CANTABRIA)

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  • 1. PISAPISA Reading FrameworkReading Framework Comillas, Spain September 2013 Juliette Mendelovits September 2013 Leader, PISA reading framework and test development
  • 2. Why do countries participate iny p p international studies of educational achievement?achievement? • To collect national-level data when there is noTo collect national level data when there is no other mechanism for doing so • To compare themselves with other countries • To be involved in – and help to shape - newp p developments in education
  • 3. PISA Survey Cycley y 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 20152000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Literacy Mathematical Literacy Scientific Literacy Questionnaire Major domain cycle in yellow In PISA, framework development takes place during the major domain cycle.
  • 4. What is an assessment framework? • An assessment framework is an explicit statement and discussion about what an assessment intends to measure. • Its purposes are: – To guide test development – To give a common language to stakeholders for di i f th bj tdiscussion of the subject – To ensure continuity from one year or one grade level to anotherlevel to another – To communicate the purpose and features of the assessment program to the publicassessment program to the public
  • 5. Framework developmentp begins with a definition of the d idomain ...
  • 6. PISA’s definition of reading Reading literacy is understanding, using, reflecting on and engaging with written textsreflecting on and engaging with written texts, in order to achieve one’s goals, to develop ’one’s knowledge and potential, and to participate in society.y
  • 7. PISA uses four taskPISA uses four task characteristics in the construction f ll di lit t kof all reading literacy tasks • Context • Text format – text type • AspectAspect • Item format
  • 8. Reported Subscales for PISA Reading 2000 and 2009 Text format – Continuous – Non-continuous Aspects – Mixed – Multiple Aspects – Access and retrieve I d– Multiple – Integrate and interpret – Reflect and evaluate
  • 9. Text formatText format • Continuous I f ti • Non-continuous I f ti– Information presented in sentences and – Information presented in formats other than prose forsentences and paragraphs • Argument other than prose, for example • Tables • Description • Exposition I i • Graphs • Diagrams M• Instruction • Narration • Maps • Forms Mixed
  • 10. Example of a mixed textmixed text A text thatA text that comprises continuous andcontinuous and non-continuous partsparts Mixed
  • 11. Text formatText format • Continuous I f ti • Non-continuous I f ti– Information presented in sentences and – Information presented in formats other than prose forsentences and paragraphs • Argument other than prose, for example • Tables • Description • Exposition I i • Graphs • Diagrams M Stimulus comprising• Instruction • Narration • Maps • Forms comprising several texts of any kind Multiple any kind Multiple
  • 12. Text formats … further categorised by text types • Continuous• Continuous N ti • Narration • Exposition • Non-continuous p • Description • Mixed • Argumentation • Instruction • Multiple • Instruction • Transaction
  • 13. Aspects • Access and retrieve • Integrate and interpret• Integrate and interpret • Reflect and evaluate
  • 14. Sample Text from PISA 2000 and 2009 MacondoMacondo Dazzled by so many and such marvellous inventions, the people of Macondo did not know where their amazement began They stayed upMacondo did not know where their amazement began. They stayed up all night looking at the pale electric bulbs fed by the plant that Aureliano Triste had brought back when the train made its second trip, and it took time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom-time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom toom. They became indignant over the living images that the prosperous merchant Don Bruno Crespi projected in the theatre with the lion-head ticket windows, for a character who had died and was, buried in one film, and for whose misfortune tears of affliction had been shed, would reappear alive and transformed into an Arab in the next one. The audience, who paid two centavos apiece to share the difficulties of the actors, would not tolerate that outlandish fraud and they broke up the seats. The mayor, at the urging of Don Bruno Crespi, explained by means of a proclamation that the cinema was a machine of illusions that did not merit the emotional outburst of the audience. With that discouraging explanation many felt that they had been the victims of some new and showy gypsy business and they decided not t t t th i id i th t th l d h d tto return to the movies, considering that they already had too many troubles of their own to weep over the acted-out misfortunes of imaginary beings.
  • 15. Macondo Sample access and retrieve item Macondo Dazzled by so many and such marvellous inventions, the people of Macondo did not know where their amazement began They stayed upMacondo did not know where their amazement began. They stayed up all night looking at the pale electric bulbs fed by the plant that Aureliano Triste had brought back when the train made its second trip, and it took time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessivetime and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom-toom. They became indignant over the living images that the prosperous merchant Don Bruno Crespi projected in the theatre with the lion-head ticket windows, for a character who had died and was, buried in one film, and for whose misfortune tears of affliction had been shed, would reappear alive and transformed into an Arab in the next one. The audience, who paid two centavos apiece to share the difficulties of the actors, would not tolerate that outlandish fraud and they broke up the seats. The mayor, at the urging of Don Bruno Crespi, explained by means of a proclamation that the cinema was a machine How much did it cost to go to the cinema in Macondo? of illusions that did not merit the emotional outburst of the audience. With that discouraging explanation many felt that they had been the victims of some new and showy gypsy business and they decided not t t t th i id i th t th l d h d t One centavo Two centavos Th tto return to the movies, considering that they already had too many troubles of their own to weep over the acted-out misfortunes of imaginary beings. Three centavos Four centavos
  • 16. Macondo Sample integrate and interpret item Macondo Dazzled by so many and such marvellous inventions, the people of Macondo did not know where their amazement began They stayed upAt the end of the passage why didMacondo did not know where their amazement began. They stayed up all night looking at the pale electric bulbs fed by the plant that Aureliano Triste had brought back when the train made its second trip, and it took time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom- At the end of the passage, why did the people of Macondo decide not to return to the movies?time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom toom. They became indignant over the living images that the prosperous merchant Don Bruno Crespi projected in the theatre with the lion-head ticket windows, for a character who had died and was, buried in one film, and for whose misfortune tears of affliction had been shed, would reappear alive and transformed into an Arab in the next one. The audience, who paid two centavos apiece to share the difficulties of the actors, would not tolerate that outlandish fraud and they broke up the seats. The mayor, at the urging of Don Bruno Crespi, explained by means of a proclamation that the cinema was a machine of illusions that did not merit the emotional outburst of the audience. With that discouraging explanation many felt that they had been the victims of some new and showy gypsy business and they decided not t t t th i id i th t th l d h d tto return to the movies, considering that they already had too many troubles of their own to weep over the acted-out misfortunes of imaginary beings.
  • 17. Macondo Sample reflect and evaluate item Macondo Dazzled by so many and such marvellous inventions, the people of Macondo did not know where their amazement began They stayed upMacondo did not know where their amazement began. They stayed up all night looking at the pale electric bulbs fed by the plant that Aureliano Triste had brought back when the train made its second trip, and it took time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom-time and effort for them to grow accustomed to its obsessive toom toom. They became indignant over the living images that the prosperous merchant Don Bruno Crespi projected in the theatre with the lion-head ticket windows, for a character who had died and was Do you agree with the final judgement of the people of Macondo about the value of the movies? , buried in one film, and for whose misfortune tears of affliction had been shed, would reappear alive and transformed into an Arab in the next one. The audience, who paid two centavos apiece to share the the movies? Explain your answer by comparing your attitude to the movies with theirs. difficulties of the actors, would not tolerate that outlandish fraud and they broke up the seats. The mayor, at the urging of Don Bruno Crespi, explained by means of a proclamation that the cinema was a machine attitude to the movies with theirs. of illusions that did not merit the emotional outburst of the audience. With that discouraging explanation many felt that they had been the victims of some new and showy gypsy business and they decided not t t t th i id i th t th l d h d tto return to the movies, considering that they already had too many troubles of their own to weep over the acted-out misfortunes of imaginary beings.
  • 18. Example of students’ answers to Macondo reflect and evaluate itemreflect and evaluate item Do you agree with the final judgement of the people of Macondo about the value of thepeople of Macondo about the value of the movies? Explain your answer by comparing your attitude to the movies with theirs Yes, I agree, there’s enough suffering in the world without making it up to the movies with theirs. world without making it up.  No, people understand that when you go to the movies what happens on the screento the movies what happens on the screen isn’t real. It d d If th fil i bbi h I f l likIt depends. If the film is rubbish, I feel like walking out, but if it’s good you are caught up in it and don’t mind if it’s not true.
  • 19. Item formatItem format About • Selected response Multiple choice About 55% How much did it cost to go to the cinema– Multiple choice – Complex multiple choice How much did it cost to go to the cinema in Macondo? One centavo Two centavos About Two centavos Three centavos Four centavos • Constructed response Cl d t t d 45% D ith th fi l j d t f th l f– Closed constructed response – Short constructed response Do you agree with the final judgement of the people of Macondo about the value of the movies? Explain your answer by comparing your attitude to the movies with theirs – Extended constructed response movies with theirs. ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________
  • 20. Why do countries participate iny p p international studies of educational achievement?achievement? • To collect national-level data whenTo collect national level data when there is no other mechanism for doing soso • To compare themselves with otherp countries • To be involved in and help to shape• To be involved in – and help to shape - new developments in education
  • 21. PISA Survey Cycley y 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Literacy Mathematical Literacy Scientific Literacy Questionnaire
  • 22. PISA Survey Cycley y 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Literacy Mathematical Literacy Scientific Literacy Questionnaire Problem Solving
  • 23. PISA Survey Cycley y 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Literacy Mathematical Literacy Scientific Literacy Questionnaire Problem Solving Financial LiteracyFinancial Literacy
  • 24. PISA Survey Cycley y 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Literacy Mathematical Literacy Scientific Literacy Questionnaire Problem Solving Financial LiteracyFinancial Literacy Computer-based Science Digital reading Three domains ALL domains
  • 25. NEW DIRECTIONS IN PISANEW DIRECTIONS IN PISA READING:READING: DIGITAL READING
  • 26. What is digital reading? Reading literacy is understanding, using, reflecting on and engaging with writtenreflecting on and engaging with written texts, in order to achieve one’s goals, to develop one’s knowledge and potentialdevelop one s knowledge and potential, and to participate in society. (PISA definition of reading literac )(PISA definition of reading literacy) • In the 21st century, proficiency in reading means proficiency in both print and digital media • Digital reading is not just reading print text on a computer screen
  • 27. Analogies …Analogies … Page of a goIn the print medium In the electronic medium Page of a go Page of a book Web page A book A web site Bibliography, references, “further reading” Links on a web site to other sites A very very very big library The Internet
  • 28. In PISA digital reading isIn PISA, digital reading is conceptualised in terms of two components • Text processingText processing • Navigation
  • 29. Relationship between navigation and text processing for digital reading taskstext processing for digital reading tasks
  • 30. Example of a PISA digital reading task (1)g g ( )
  • 31. Example of a PISA digital reading task (2)g g ( )
  • 32. Example of a PISA digital reading task (3)g g ( )
  • 33. DRA Sample ItemsDRA Sample Items http://erasq.acer.edu.auhttp://erasq.acer.edu.au
  • 34. Thank youy For more information about PISA go tog www.pisa.oecd.org

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