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The role of lifesaving in community development, experiences from indigenous Australia …

The role of lifesaving in community development, experiences from indigenous Australia

Author: Justin Scarr

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  • 1. Lifesaving and community development Experiences from indigenous Australia Justin Scarr – Royal Life Saving Society Australia Co-authors Richard Franklin & Rob Bradley
  • 2. Introductory Statement
    • Incorporating lifesaving themes into a Community Driven Development Model not only saves lives from drowning but can support community capacity to face a range of social, economic and health challenges.
  • 3. Life expectancy in Australia at birth in years Population Category Male Female All Australians (1999–2001) 77.0 82.1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (1996 – 2001) 59.4 (↓17.6) 64.6 (↓17.5) All Australians (1920–1922) 59 65 Australian Medical Association 2007 ATSI Report Card
  • 4. Some causes are
    • social determinants of health
      • income
      • social status
      • social support
    • networks
      • education and literacy
      • employment and working conditions
    • social environments
      • physical environments
      • housing
  • 5. Benefits of swimming pools in two remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia: intervention study Lehmann, Tennant, Silva, McAullay, Lannigan, Coates, Stanley
    • Findings: Introduction of swimming pools in two remote Aboriginal communities was associated with reduced prevalence of pyoderma (skin) and tympanic membrane (ear) perforations.
    • Secondary findings: Swimming pools provide important social capital in disadvantaged communities
    • RLSS - Western Australia provides pool management services to these and other remote indigenous community pools
  • 6. The intervention
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9. Project aim
    • To maximize the health , social and economic benefits of the Nauiyu community swimming pool
    • by implementing a community driven development model incorporating lifesaving themes.
  • 10. Objectives
    • Community engagement
    • Increases in frequency of and participation in programs, events and activities
    • Support community employment, skills and leadership
    • Communicate health benefits to community
  • 11. Primary evaluation strategies
    • Health screening data
    • Modified Delphi Technique at 12mths using key informants from across internal/external stakeholders and key demographics;
      • Two interviews and a group session
      • Review of project outcomes in areas of
        • Successful engagement
        • Increase in physical activity
        • Employment pathways
        • Successful communication
    • Change in swimming timetable
  • 12. Health Screening of Nauiyu Children 4 -15 years HEALTH ISSUE Mar-06 % Mar-07 % Trachoma follicles 17 18.5 6 8.3 Skin Sores 9 9.8 3 4.2 Ear Nose Throat Referrals 6 6.5 0 0.0 Failed audiometric test 2 2.2 0 0.0 Anemia 2 2.2 11 15.3 Heart abnormalities 0 0.0 0 0.0 Eye test failure 0 0.0 0 0.0 Sample size (75-90% of population) 92 100 72 100
  • 13. Results – influencing authority
    • Government upgrade of the swimming pool AUD$400,000
    • Council funding weekend operations
    • Fixed agenda item in council meetings
    • Project officer was elected council president in May 2007
  • 14. Results – social infrastructure
    • Project steering committee has been expanded to include;
      • Six community agencies
      • Parent representative
      • Young person representative
    • Is taking a wider role in community recreation and health activities
    • Key consultation group for government
  • 15. Results – community happiness
    • Impact on employment
      • Rewarding
      • Volunteering
      • Attendance
    • Parents are happy about increased use of pool in children
    • Project was awarded an Australian Day Honor for best community project in Northern Territory
  • 16. Desired timetable Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 6.30 – 8.30am Lap swimmers Lap swimmers Lap swimmers Lap swimmers Lap swimmers Closed 8.30 – 12.30pm Childcare Child care Aged care Aged care Rehab Recreational swimming 12.30 – 1.30pm Closed Closed Closed Adults Adults Continued 1.30 – 3.30pm School use School use School use School use School use Recreation swimming 3.30 – 4.30pm After school program After school program After school program After school program After school program Recreational program 4.30 – 5.30pm Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Closed 5.30 – 8.00pm Closed Closed Closed Youth Youth Closed
  • 17. Timetable at commencement Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 6.30 – 8.30am 8.30 – 12.30pm Those with a key 12.30 – 1.30pm 1.30 – 3.30pm School 3.30 – 4.30pm Recreation 4.30 – 5.30pm 5.30 – 8.00pm
  • 18. Timetable as at May 07 Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 6.30 – 8.30am Closed 8.30 – 12.30pm Childcare Child care Aged care – gatherings Aged care – gatherings Rehab Recreational swimming 12.30 – 1.30pm Closed Closed Closed Adults -readiness Adults - readiness Continued 1.30 – 3.30pm School use School use School use School use School use Recreation swimming 3.30 – 4.30pm After school program After school program After school program After school program After school program Recreational program 4.30 – 5.30pm Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Recreational program Closed 5.30 – 8.00pm Closed Closed Closed Youth Youth Closed
  • 19. Key to success - community driven development
    • The process of developing active and sustainable communities based on social justice and mutual respect.
    • Influencing power structures to remove the barriers that prevent people from participating in the issues that affect their lives.
  • 20. Royal Life Saving Community Development Model
  • 21.  
  • 22. Community engagement
  • 23. Lessons for lifesaving agencies
    • Recognize the health, social and economic benefits that we enjoy as a result of being part of the lifesaving family.
    • Build community capacity through lifesaving in order to impact the big issues in life.
  • 24. Lessons for lifesaving agencies
    • Community development is not training and certification
    • Engage people and other agencies in the identification, development and review of the solution
    • Support the little people in a community
    • Seek partnerships with diverse agencies
  • 25. Acknowledgements
    • Nauiyu Traditional Owners
    • Nauiyu Community
    • Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
    • RLSSA Board and CEO
    • RLSSA staff including Betty Sullivan and Richard Franklin