Safe Food, Fair Food: Summaryof findings within lowland goat and  sheep value chains in Ethiopia          Barbara Rischkow...
Safe Food, Fair Food Protecting the health of poor consumers                       and Safeguarding livelihoods of poor ...
Background Looking at risks to food safety and  nutrition within sheep and goat value  chains Trying to identify opportu...
Activities Rapid assessment conducted  alongside rapid VCA at each  site Participatory rural appraisals  (PRAs) with pro...
Results: both sites Sheep and goat meat consumption   – Very similar between sites   – Peaks at major national and religi...
Results: both sites Risks to safety of sheep and goat meat   – Emergency slaughter and consumption of     diseased animal...
Results: both sites Sheep and goat milk consumption   – Consumption seasonal: depends on combination     of lambing/kiddi...
Results: both sites Risks to safety of sheep and goat  milk   – Consumption of raw milk Risk mitigation   – Smoking milk...
Results: Borena Sick animals        Deaths
Results: Borena Risky food practices   – Consumption of dead animals, even if suspected      of anthrax   – Consumption o...
Results: Shinelle Sick animals        Deaths
Results: Shinelle Risky food practices   – Consumption of animals with FMD     or tick-related disease   – Purchase of me...
Conclusions Meat  – Increased frequency of consumption     compared to other sites  – Especially risky practices (raw mea...
Safe Food, Fair Food Tamsin Dewé, Consultant                      tamsindewe@gmail.com Kristina Rösel, Project Co-Ordina...
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Safe Food, Fair Food: Summary of findings within lowland goat and sheep value chains in Ethiopia

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Presented by Barbara Rischkowsky, Tamsin Dewé and Kristina Rösel at the Multi-stakeholder Workshop for Targeting Action Research on Lowland Sheep and Goat Value Chains in Ethiopia, Debre Zeit 1-2 April 2013


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  • Results for Shinelle may be slightly ‘off’ with respect to months – respondents preferred to discuss as seasons.
  • Transcript of "Safe Food, Fair Food: Summary of findings within lowland goat and sheep value chains in Ethiopia"

    1. 1. Safe Food, Fair Food: Summaryof findings within lowland goat and sheep value chains in Ethiopia Barbara Rischkowsky, Tamsin Dewé, Kristina Rösel,Multi-stakeholder Workshop for Targeting Action Research on Lowland Sheep and Goat Value Chains in Ethiopia Debre Zeit 1-2April 2013
    2. 2. Safe Food, Fair Food Protecting the health of poor consumers and Safeguarding livelihoods of poor livestock keepers and other value chain actors
    3. 3. Background Looking at risks to food safety and nutrition within sheep and goat value chains Trying to identify opportunities for further research and intervention Ultimate goal is to ensure adequate intake of safe and nutritious foods, while protecting the livelihoods of poor value chain actors
    4. 4. Activities Rapid assessment conducted alongside rapid VCA at each site Participatory rural appraisals (PRAs) with producer and consumer groups Also focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of young children Topics included animal health, consumption patterns, food preparation, and perceptions of quality and safety of meat and milk
    5. 5. Results: both sites Sheep and goat meat consumption – Very similar between sites – Peaks at major national and religious festivals – Low in intervening periods
    6. 6. Results: both sites Risks to safety of sheep and goat meat – Emergency slaughter and consumption of diseased animals can occur – Purchase of meat from informal markets Risk mitigation – Don’t eat animals affected by specific diseases – Smell, colour and absence of pus/lesions used to assess quality and safety – Cooking of ‘suspect’ meat thoroughly
    7. 7. Results: both sites Sheep and goat milk consumption – Consumption seasonal: depends on combination of lambing/kidding and feed availability
    8. 8. Results: both sites Risks to safety of sheep and goat milk – Consumption of raw milk Risk mitigation – Smoking milking containers – Don’t consume milk that is discoloured or contains blood or pus – Processing to butter
    9. 9. Results: Borena Sick animals  Deaths
    10. 10. Results: Borena Risky food practices – Consumption of dead animals, even if suspected of anthrax – Consumption of milk with sour or abnormal taste or smell – Milk is not boiled at Eloheye – Children given food other than breast milk at young age (<6 months) Risk mitigation – Meat considered unsafe is trimmed and/or boiled thoroughly in rural areas – In town, ‘suspect’ meat is not purchased – Milk is sieved to remove dirt and hair Nutritional issues – Producers consume more meat and milk than those at other sites – Town people do not always have access
    11. 11. Results: Shinelle Sick animals  Deaths
    12. 12. Results: Shinelle Risky food practices – Consumption of animals with FMD or tick-related disease – Purchase of meat from informal markets – Consumption of raw milk Risk-mitigating practices – Only healthy animals slaughtered otherwise – Dead animals not consumed – Urban consumers avoid ‘suspect’ meat – Meat cooked thoroughly – Processing of milk into butter
    13. 13. Conclusions Meat – Increased frequency of consumption compared to other sites – Especially risky practices (raw meat, sick or dead animals) in Borena – Better if all meat and offal is well- cooked - some loss of nutritional quality, but large reduction in risks – Role of informal butchers at both sites Milk – Boiling milk is a simple message to convey to reduce foodborne disease – Less consumption whole shoat milk in towns/cities
    14. 14. Safe Food, Fair Food Tamsin Dewé, Consultant tamsindewe@gmail.com Kristina Rösel, Project Co-Ordinator k.rosel@cgiar.org All photo credits to ILRI/ Tamsin Dewé unless otherwise indicated
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