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Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam
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Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam

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Presented by Lucy Lapar at the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning meeting, Nairobi, 27-29 September 2011 …

Presented by Lucy Lapar at the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning meeting, Nairobi, 27-29 September 2011

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. Update on pig value chain development in Vietnam Lucy Lapar (ILRI)CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning Meeting ILRI Nairobi 27-29 September 2011
  • 2. Why pigs in Vietnam? Pork is a significant component of the Vietnamese diet, er capita pork consumption is likely to remain on the uptrend with rising incomes. Strong demand for fresh pork that smallholders can supply through most preferred outlets by consumers; Changing nature of pork demand, e.g., emerging food safety, quality concerns need to be assessed and properly understood Dominance of smallholders in pig production, importance in employment generation, significant contribution to HH income Smallholder competitiveness (vis-à-vis other suppliers, e.g., large farms, imports) remains a development policy challenge (rising feed prices, animal disease risks) Enabling policy environment, willingness of policymakers, development partners, and stakeholders to engage in R4D initiatives Building on previous ILRI work with various partners.
  • 3. Impact pathway and outcomesPathway: works with research and development partners and value chain actors to identify opportunities, test and validate best-bet options and strategies, and disseminate lessons for scaling up and policy advocacy for pro-poor upgrading of the value chain.Outcome: increased marketable surplus (30%) from household pig production and sustained, viable participation by smallholders in pig production in the project sites (10%)
  • 4. Proposed Intermediate Outcomes Priority VC constraints resolved and/or relaxed Increase in farm level productivity (30%) Evidence and mechanism for scaling out are in place.
  • 5. Value Chain Outcomes: Inputs and Services Increased access by smallholders to good quality and cost- effective inputs such as appropriate feeds and breeds. Improved access by smallholders to efficient and cost-effective veterinary and extension services. Increased availability of cost-effective feeding options. More efficient markets for inputs and services in place.
  • 6. Value Chain Outcomes: Production Improved productivity from adoption of good quality, cost- effective feeding options. Increased survival, growth, and disease resistance of sows and piglets. Enhanced production cost-efficiency from adoption of suitable pig breeds. Reduced incidence of pig diseases (e.g., PRRS, classical swine fever, diarrhea, cysticercosis, among others). Improved uptake by smallholders of appropriate pig husbandry and animal health practices.
  • 7. Value Chain Outcomes: Transport and Processing  Reduced incidence of food-borne and water-borne diseases associated with pork consumption.  Increased public and private sector investment in upgrading of slaughtering and marketing facilities.  Better trained slaughterhouse operators, carcass transporters, and other pork supply chain actors.
  • 8. Value Chain Outcomes: Marketing Increased availability of safe and hygienic pork supplied by smallholders or household producers. More efficient marketing system and arrangements in place and accessible to smallholder pig producers. Increased share of pork retail price accruing to smallholder pig producers. Higher proportion of women participation in pork supply chain, and improved income opportunities for women from these activities.
  • 9. Proposed Priority Outcomes & Outputs 2012 2013 2014Outcomes CRP3.7, local and 1. Partners have capacity to Evidence base in each international partners have use basic set of tools for VC target VC for best-bet established an R&D alliance toassessment pro-poor VC transform target VC in each 2. Stakeholders in each development country country are increasingly interventions is aware of potential, influencing constraints and initial development options for pro-poor investment decisions development of target VC
  • 10. Proposed Priority Outcomes & Outputs 2012 2013 2014Outcomes R&D alliance 1. capacity to use tools Evidence base 2. Stakeholders aware influencing decisionsResearch 1. Scoping study to develop an 1. Inventory and evidence base 1. Best-bet interventionOutputs inventory of feed technology (literature review) for key strategy formulated and options and identify stakeholders constraints and proposed tested, ready for scaling and potential partners. solutions compiled up and out. 2. Rapid assessment of target VC 2. Quantitative assessment of to inform design of in-depth VC performance assessment of animal health constraints, and to identify 3. Technical and economic preliminary priority constraints assessments of key VC and best-bet upgrading strategies components to target for to test. upgrading (e.g. farm-level: husbandry, feeds, breeds, 3. Selected best-best options on health, environmental issues; feeds (and possibly animal health market-level: institutional (biosecurity, diagnostics) and environment, food safety, breed) identified and piloting demand characteristics; initiated in selected sites (e.g. overall: policies, organizational with LIFSAP) strategies)
  • 11. Proposed Priority Outcomes & Outputs 2012 2013 2014Outcomes R&D alliance 1. capacity to use tools Evidence base 2. Stakeholders aware influencing decisionsResearchOutputs 4. Basic toolkit for VC assessment 4. Pig feed ration decision compiled for testing (with CRP 2) support tool – to inform feeding options under a range 5. Analytical framework for of feed types, nutrient value, assessing VC performance and feed prices (build on CIP- established (with CRP 2) LifSim model?)
  • 12. Current Activities & Resources/Potential LinkagesACIAR Improving competitiveness of pig producers in an adjusting Vietnam market (recently completed, ongoing engagement with national partners on policy advocacy, outreach) Supporting small-scale pig production in Vietnam through reducing risks, enhancing productivity, and upgrading value chains (with CRP 4.3, likely 2012)GEF-Asia Development and application of decision support tools to conserve and(Vietnam) sustainably use genetic diversity in indigenous livestock and wild relatives (pigs)CIAT Improved forage-based feeding systems in Vietnam (+Cambodia, Laos)WB-MARD Livestock Competitiveness and Food Safety Project (development partner)
  • 13. Identified Priority Gaps for Resource Mobilization  VC assessment of productivity constraints from animal diseases, prioritization.  Inventory of feeding options and assessment to identify best-bet options for testing and validation, both in terms of technical parameters and economic viability.  Assessment of innovation capacity at farm level (farmers, development partners on technology adoption) and along the value chain (best practices, institutions).  Assessment of VC performance (ex ante and ex post) of identified interventions.
  • 14. 2012 Priorities for Organisational, Capacity Development and Communication Activities Restructure team to match CRP needs at the target VC (currently, 37% of economist time + possible access to minimal vet-epi time from CRP 4.3). Identify gaps for priority recruitment and/or shared appointments (local research support, pig nutrition) and partnership. Identify strategy and mechanisms for working links internally with other CRP3.7 components, and externally with CRP2 and CRP 4.3.

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