Smallholder Pig Value Chains in Uganda
Livestock and Fish By and For the Poor (CRP 3.7)
Danilo A. Pezo
Impact Pathways Wor...
The livestock sector in Uganda
The
agricultural
sector
• Important sector of the economy
• Contributes up to 23.8 % of the...
Trends in livestock population
Table 1: Trends in livestock population (values in ‘000’) in Uganda (FAO, 2005; MAAIF, 2009...
Average herd density per district
Pig density per district-overall
Masaka
Mukono
Kayunga
Mpigi
Tororo
Rakai
Kumi Sironko
P...
Percentage of population living on less than 1.25$ per day
Where are the poor?
Travel time (hrs) to nearest city with more than 50,000 persons
Market access
Imports and Exports of Live Pigs and Pig Meat
Products, 2007-2011 (URA, 2012)
Items 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Live pigs imp...
Consumption of pork and pig meat products
Increase in Uganda’s human population, currently
estimated to be about 35 millio...
Importance OF Pig Production in Uganda:
A Summary
Pig production- a dynamic and rapidly growing sector in Uganda. In the
p...
Policy framework in Uganda
Committed to increase investment in core areas of:
• Agricultural research; agricultural adviso...
Policy framework in Uganda (…cont.)
• National Policy for the Delivery of Veterinary Services (2001)
• National Veterinary...
Pig production systems in Uganda
Intensive
pig system
• Pigs are kept housed all the time (are provided with feeds, water,...
STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA
A large informal subsector
• More than 1.1 million households
• Backyard pig product...
STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA
A small formal subsector
•Some medium-scale piggeries
•Mostly feeding compound feeds...
Farm
Systems:
Breeding
Growing/Fattening
Inputs and
Services
Pig breeder
Vet / Animal Prod
extension services
Agrovet / fe...
Types of Pig Value Chains found in Uganda
Peri-
urban
Urban
Rural Urban
Rural Rural
Production Consumption
Smallholder Pig Value Chains Map
SMALLHOLDER PRODUCER
PRIVATE-AHSP
GOVERNMENT-
AHSP
ANIMAL BASED
DRUG SHOPS
VILLAGE BOAR
B...
SOME CONSTRAINTS IN THE SMALLHOLDER PIG
VALUE CHAIN
At farm level
- Nutrition and feeds (poor quality feeds, seasonality)
...
SOME CONSTRAINTS IN THE SMALLHOLDER PIG
VALUE CHAINS (CONT…)
At market level
- Lack of organizational strategies
- Poor ro...
Unsubstantiated Information on Pork Safety Risks
 „Majority of pork in Kampala
contaminated“
 with what?
 „Increasingly...
 „ALL pork supplied in
Kampala for human
consumption is
contaminated“
 defamation, severerly
damaging a sector‘s reputat...
Conclusions of the Situational Analysis
(Tatwangire, 2012)
 Access to affordable credit, training, extension services,
ve...
Conclusions of the Situational Analysis (cont...)
(Tatwangire, 2012)
 Poor hygiene/contamination of pork, abattoirs, and ...
The ILRI Team in Uganda
THANK YOU FOR
YOUR
ATTENTION!
The presentation has a Creative Commons licence. You are free to re-use or distribute this work, provided credit is given ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Smallholder pig value chains in Uganda

1,279

Published on

Presented by Danilo Pezo at the Uganda Smallholder Pigs Value Chain Impact Pathways Workshop, Kampala, Uganda, 27-28 June 2013

Published in: Technology, Business
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • We are participating in Aviana Africa Uganda Expo on 30th Oct, 31st Oct 2014. Get Joining Us on our booth No. 41 with your precious visit. We welcome you in advance. Regards. SURGIPHARMA for Veterinary Instruments.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,279
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
50
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Smallholder pig value chains in Uganda

  1. 1. Smallholder Pig Value Chains in Uganda Livestock and Fish By and For the Poor (CRP 3.7) Danilo A. Pezo Impact Pathways Workshop Kampala, 27th - 28th June 2013
  2. 2. The livestock sector in Uganda The agricultural sector • Important sector of the economy • Contributes up to 23.8 % of the GDP, generating about 48% of export earnings (Republic of Uganda 2010; MAAIF 2011). Livestock sector • Contributes 15% of agricultural GDP (FAO, 2005). A 3 % increase in the number of livestock & poultry, 2009- 2010 (MAAIF 2011). • About 4.5 million households (70.8%) rear at least one kind of livestock/poultry (UBOS & MAAIF 2009). Pig enterprise • Pig production widespread & increasing at a high rate. • About 17.8 % (1.1 millions) of all households own at least 1 pig (UBOS & MAAIF 2009). • Pig production not among priority areas in the Agricultural Sector Development Strategy and Investment Plan (DSIP) for Uganda.
  3. 3. Trends in livestock population Table 1: Trends in livestock population (values in ‘000’) in Uganda (FAO, 2005; MAAIF, 2009) Table 2: Pigs and ruminant livestock population (x 1000) in 2008 (UBOS/MAAIF, 2009) Species Period (in Years) 1980 1990 2000 2002 2008 Cattle 4,771 4,913 5,966 6,075 11,409 Sheep and goats 3,862 5,490 7,477 7,993 15,863 Pigs 187 1,160 1,573 1,710 3,184 Poultry 13,200 18,960 26,974 32,638 37,444 Region Pigs Cattle Goats Sheep Population % Population % Population % Population % Central 1,308 41 2,476 22 1,676 13 272 8 Eastern 700 22 2,489 22 2,500 21 319 9 Northern 341 11 1,642 14 2,696 22 569 17 Western 778 24 2,549 22 3,452 28 568 17 Karamoja 58 2 2,254 20 2,025 16 1,686 49 Total 3,184 100 11,409 100 12,450 100 3,413 100
  4. 4. Average herd density per district Pig density per district-overall Masaka Mukono Kayunga Mpigi Tororo Rakai Kumi Sironko Pig population density
  5. 5. Percentage of population living on less than 1.25$ per day Where are the poor?
  6. 6. Travel time (hrs) to nearest city with more than 50,000 persons Market access
  7. 7. Imports and Exports of Live Pigs and Pig Meat Products, 2007-2011 (URA, 2012) Items 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Live pigs imported Number - 1030 - - -- Value (Millions UGX) - 24.6 - - - Pig meat and meat products imported Quantity (Kg) 10341 9375 10777 - 133601 Value (Millions UGX) 28.6 40.4 53.3 - 2247.6 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Live pigs exported Number 310 174 - 122 - Value (Millions UGX) 31.8 8.5 - 43.1 - Pig meat and meat products exported Quantity (Kg) 18622 - 179 32790.4 1346.1 Value (Millions UGX) 17.5 - 6.0 295.5 29.6
  8. 8. Consumption of pork and pig meat products Increase in Uganda’s human population, currently estimated to be about 35 millions; about 775 thousand reside in Kampala. • High domestic & regional demand for pork/pork products:- increase in human population growth, urbanization, purchasing power & change in tastes & preferences Daily consumption of pigs (pigs slaughtered per day) in Kampala is estimated to be between 300 and 500. • Pork products in Uganda include: live pigs, large pieces (the thighs & chest) of pork, pork chops, pork sausages, bacon, ham, roasted (or fried) pork chops, and ribs.
  9. 9. Importance OF Pig Production in Uganda: A Summary Pig production- a dynamic and rapidly growing sector in Uganda. In the past three decades increased from 0.19 to 3.2 million pigs (UBOS/MAAIF, 2009; FAO, 2011). Uganda has the highest per capita consumption (3.4 kg/person/year) in the region -10 times increase in the last 30 years, whereas beef is declining (FAO, 2011)
  10. 10. Policy framework in Uganda Committed to increase investment in core areas of: • Agricultural research; agricultural advisory services; pest and disease control; regulatory services; promoting value chain development; improved use of water for agricultural production, and; the support & supervision of service delivery in local governments. • Concerns of a costly policy duplication in the past 12 years. The National Development Plan (NDP), 2009-2014 • Replaced the two former national plans “the Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP) and the Strategic Plan for Modernization of Agriculture (PMA), 2001 - 2009. • In line with the Agricultural Sector Development Strategy & Investment Plan (DSIP), a guide to the country’s agricultural priorities, development programs, and agricultural transformation. Pigs are not a priority livestock species. • Livestock development plan and Animal health strategy • A road-map to public interventions in the agricultural sector, to boost agricultural growth, food security and poverty reduction.
  11. 11. Policy framework in Uganda (…cont.) • National Policy for the Delivery of Veterinary Services (2001) • National Veterinary Drug Policy (2002) • The National Animal Feeds Policy (2005) • Animal Breeding Policy (1997) and Act (2001) Animal health • The National Meat Policy (2003) • Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP) II 2005-2010 • National Environment Policy • Decentralization Policy (1993) Food safety • The National Land Use Policy • National Adaptation Plan of Action 2007 • Uganda Food and Nutrition Policy, 2003 • The privatization policy (allowed private participation of DVs) Other issues
  12. 12. Pig production systems in Uganda Intensive pig system • Pigs are kept housed all the time (are provided with feeds, water, and protection from extreme weather) • Characterized by higher demand for labour/other inputs. Provides higher farm output; accounts for a very small proportion Semi- intensive pig system • Pigs are partly housed & partly kept outdoors on the pasture • Allows improvement in feeding; growth rate; disease control; control of heat stress; mating, and; the quality of animals. Demands high amounts of labour, but gives relatively high farm output. Extensive or tethered pig- system • The simplest & most common system in Uganda. Pigs are kept out-door, to freely move around the homestead as they feed on their own, or tethered. • Often practiced by the very poor, who tend to invest in a low cost/ low output farming system, characterizes subsistence production
  13. 13. STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA A large informal subsector • More than 1.1 million households • Backyard pig production, mainly managed by women and children • Tethering & scavenging • Small number of peri-urban small-scale semi- intensive • Uncoordinated trade & transport • Mostly unsupervised slaughter, no meat inspection in local markets, road-side butchers • Pork joints
  14. 14. STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA A small formal subsector •Some medium-scale piggeries •Mostly feeding compound feeds •Few urban slaughterhouses (only one approved abbatoir) • Processors •Fresh Cuts (Uganda); Farmers Choice (Kenya) • Provide to supermarkets, hotels, restaurants
  15. 15. Farm Systems: Breeding Growing/Fattening Inputs and Services Pig breeder Vet / Animal Prod extension services Agrovet / feed shop owners Feed manufacturers and suppliers Transporters of inputs Post-farm Live-pig traders Transporters Slaughterers Pork Butchers Pork processors- large and medium Supermarkets/ restaurants Consumers Actors in a typical pig value chain
  16. 16. Types of Pig Value Chains found in Uganda Peri- urban Urban Rural Urban Rural Rural Production Consumption
  17. 17. Smallholder Pig Value Chains Map SMALLHOLDER PRODUCER PRIVATE-AHSP GOVERNMENT- AHSP ANIMAL BASED DRUG SHOPS VILLAGE BOAR BANKS KNOWLEDGABLE FARMERS FEED MILLERS FEED SHOPS NEIGHBOURHOOD BUTCHER (pork, live pigs) TRADER (live pigs) NAADS MFI BUTCHER IN OTHER TOWN (pork) WHOLESALER FEEDS PIGLETS FROM NEIGHBOURS ABBATOIR (pork) PROCESSOR (pork, sausages and bacon) SUPERMARKETS/H OTELS PORK JOINTS (pork) CONSUMERS SACCOS NGO Treatment, diagnosis, prevention, drugs Breeding, replacement pigs Credit Mixed feeds, maize bran Extension services Bulking Wholesaling/slaughtering Retailing
  18. 18. SOME CONSTRAINTS IN THE SMALLHOLDER PIG VALUE CHAIN At farm level - Nutrition and feeds (poor quality feeds, seasonality) - Swine health (ASF, tryps, lice, mange, helminths, others) - Genetics & breeding strategies (inbreeding) - Husbandry & management (deficient corrals, if available) - Poor access to information and services - Limited organization to achieve economies of scale
  19. 19. SOME CONSTRAINTS IN THE SMALLHOLDER PIG VALUE CHAINS (CONT…) At market level - Lack of organizational strategies - Poor road infrastructure - Limited market information, standards (e.g., lack of weighing at farm gate) - No value addition / underdeveloped processing sector - Poor slaughter technologies and infrastructure (by- product losses, and risk for disseminating diseases) - Minimal attention to disease control and public health concerns (ASF, cysticercosis, others)
  20. 20. Unsubstantiated Information on Pork Safety Risks  „Majority of pork in Kampala contaminated“  with what?  „Increasingly risky for human consumption“  consequences?  „Loyal pork consumers face running mad“  per se? (Daily Monitor, June 2012)
  21. 21.  „ALL pork supplied in Kampala for human consumption is contaminated“  defamation, severerly damaging a sector‘s reputation  „Threatening to close all pork joints around the city“  risk of unemployment (Red Pepper, June 2012) Unsubstantiated Information on Pork Safety Risks
  22. 22. Conclusions of the Situational Analysis (Tatwangire, 2012)  Access to affordable credit, training, extension services, veterinary services, improved infrastructure and good breeds are crucial for improving pig productivity.  Recent routine interventions in the control of animal diseases helped improving pig production systems.  Efforts to achieve meat output targets in the country are limited by livestock policies that focus more on cattle, goats, sheep and chicken enterprises.  The private veterinary services sector is growing at a very slow pace compared to the demands for such services.  Most pig feeds produced by road side mixers, but those are unable to ensure the supply of quality feed all year round. Problems with substandard feeds and feed stuffs.
  23. 23. Conclusions of the Situational Analysis (cont...) (Tatwangire, 2012)  Poor hygiene/contamination of pork, abattoirs, and lack of cold chain is greatly reducing the competitiveness of pig sector in Uganda.  Boosting pig productivity requires improvement in breeds, feed production, and modern pig abattoirs.  Meat inspectors in the country demoralised due to the lack of authority to punish culprits of illegal and unhygienic pig slaughter.  The market of live pigs, pork & pork products is segmented and needs to be improved to reward quality, as well as to supply the poor.  The increase in the number of pigs reared appears to be more pronounced among the richest 25 percent & poorest 25 percent of households.
  24. 24. The ILRI Team in Uganda THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION!
  25. 25. The presentation has a Creative Commons licence. You are free to re-use or distribute this work, provided credit is given to ILRI. better lives through livestock ilri.org
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×