Update on the Smallholder Pig Value Chains
Development in Uganda (SPVCD) Project
Danilo Pezo, Emily A. Ouma and Michel Dio...
WHY PIG VALUE CHAINS IN UGANDA?
Pig production- a dynamic and rapidly growing sector in Uganda. In the past
three decades ...
STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA
A large informal subsector
• More than1.1 million households raise pigs in
rural and...
STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA (CONT.)
A small formal subsector
•Some medium-scale and very few large piggeries
•Mo...
Farm :
Piglet producers
Growers/Fatteners
Inputs and
Services
Breeding stock
providers
Technical assistance
(extension, ve...
GOAL
To improve the livelihoods, incomes and assets of
smallholder pig producers, particularly women, in a
sustainable man...
Vision
To transform subsistence level pig-keeping into a viable
& profitable business model to increase incomes, and
there...
MISSION
(Outcome Mapping Workshop, November 2012)
• Organize interest groups of producers and other value
chain actors.
• ...
OBJECTIVES
1. To identify market
opportunities for pork
in Uganda, and the
multiple factors
preventing
smallholder pig
pro...
BACKGROUND
• SPVCD project funded by IFAD/EU
– Period: 1st Jan 2011/ 31 Dec 2013
– NCE: 1st Jan -31st Dec 2014
• Opening o...
Progress done (1)
• Stakeholders Consultation Workshop (June 2011)
• Scoping of potential areas for the SPVCD operation
an...
Progress done (2)
• Development and testing of a tool-kit for VCA adapted to
smallholder pig value chains (in collaboratio...
Progress done (3)
• Benchmarking surveys at different nodes of the VC (farm,
input & service providers, live pig traders, ...
Some strategic partners
• MAAIF (Department of Livestock Health and Entomology).
• NARO / NaLIRRI.
• Local governments of ...
Related projects
• Safe Food Fair Food (ILRI; donor BMZ-GiZ) (same sites than
SPVCD)
• Epidemiology of ASF: a pre-requisit...
Team members
• Danilo Pezo – Project Leader/Animal
Nutritionist (ILRI)
• Emily Ouma – Agricultural Economist
(ILRI)
• Mich...
CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research for a food secure future. The CGIAR
Research P...
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Update on the Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) Project

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Presented by Danilo Pezo, Emily A. Ouma and Michel Dione at the More Pork by and for the Poor Project Inception and Planning Workshop, Mukono, Uganda, 27-28 May 2014

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  • Page title minimum of 30 points and maximum of two lines
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  • Update on the Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) Project

    1. 1. Update on the Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) Project Danilo Pezo, Emily A. Ouma and Michel Dione More Pork by and for the Poor Project Inception and Planning Workshop, Mukono, Uganda, 27-28 May 2014
    2. 2. WHY PIG VALUE CHAINS IN UGANDA? Pig production- a dynamic and rapidly growing sector in Uganda. In the past three decades increase from 0.19 to 3.2 million pigs (UBOS, 2009; FAO, 2011). Uganda has the highest per capita consumption (3.4 kg/person/year) in the region -10 times increase in the last 30 years, whereas beef is declining (FAO, 2011)
    3. 3. STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA A large informal subsector • More than1.1 million households raise pigs in rural and peri-urban settings • Mostly backyard systems, mainly managed by women and children • Low productivity (breeds, feeds & health constraints) • Uncoordinated trade & transport • Predominantly unsupervised slaughter slabs, with no meat inspection in local markets, road-side butchers, pork joints
    4. 4. STRUCTURE OF THE PIG SECTOR IN UGANDA (CONT.) A small formal subsector •Some medium-scale and very few large piggeries •Mostly feeding compounded feeds •Only one approved slaughterhouse in Kampala (Wambizzi) • Processors •Fresh Cuts (Uganda); Farmers Choice (Kenya) •Provide to supermarkets, hotels, restaurants •
    5. 5. Farm : Piglet producers Growers/Fatteners Inputs and Services Breeding stock providers Technical assistance (extension, vet. services, etc.) Feeds & drug stockists Transporters Post-farm Live-pig traders Transporters Slaughterers Pork Butchers Pork processors- large and medium Supermarkets/ restaurants Consumers ACTORS IN A TYPICAL PORK VALUE CHAIN
    6. 6. GOAL To improve the livelihoods, incomes and assets of smallholder pig producers, particularly women, in a sustainable manner, through increased productivity, reduced risk, and improved market access in pig value chains. (Project proposal, Dec. 2011)
    7. 7. Vision To transform subsistence level pig-keeping into a viable & profitable business model to increase incomes, and thereby reducing poverty and enhancing food security, while preserving community natural resource systems. (Outcome Mapping Workshop, November 2012)
    8. 8. MISSION (Outcome Mapping Workshop, November 2012) • Organize interest groups of producers and other value chain actors. • Improve access to information and markets. • Create linkages among stakeholders to service provision and sustainability. • Increase knowledge of pig farmers on animal health and disease control, food safety, breeding and feeding.
    9. 9. OBJECTIVES 1. To identify market opportunities for pork in Uganda, and the multiple factors preventing smallholder pig producers to exploit those opportunities 2. To develop and pilot test a set of integrated best-bet innovations for smallholder pig production and market access for specific conditions in Uganda 3. To document, communicate and promote appropriate evidence-based models for sustainable pro- poor pig value chains
    10. 10. BACKGROUND • SPVCD project funded by IFAD/EU – Period: 1st Jan 2011/ 31 Dec 2013 – NCE: 1st Jan -31st Dec 2014 • Opening of ILRI office in Kampala (March 2012) • ILRI-Uganda team recruitment completed (September 2012) • Works closely with the Safe Food – Fair Food Project, funded by BMZ - GiZ (CRP 4.3)
    11. 11. Progress done (1) • Stakeholders Consultation Workshop (June 2011) • Scoping of potential areas for the SPVCD operation and contacts with partners (May – July 2012) • Situational Analysis: “The conditions within which the smallholder pig value chains operate in Uganda: An overview of past trends, current status, and likely future directions” (July - December 2012) • Outcome Mapping and Site Selection Workshop (October, 2012)
    12. 12. Progress done (2) • Development and testing of a tool-kit for VCA adapted to smallholder pig value chains (in collaboration with other CRP 3.7 projects). • Application of VCA tool-kit in Kamuli, Masaka and Mukono (i.e., rural & peri-urban farms in 35 villages). • Preliminary identification of best-bet interventions to tackle relevant constraints and opportunities (workshop April 2013). • Impact pathways in smallholder pig value chains in Uganda (workshop June 2013). • Disease prevalence surveys in the three districts (June 2013 – some analysis on going).
    13. 13. Progress done (3) • Benchmarking surveys at different nodes of the VC (farm, input & service providers, live pig traders, retailers, etc.). • Feedback on VCA results in Masaka and Mukono (workshops November 2013). Kamuli is pending. • Analysis of feeds used in Ugandan pig systems (on going). • Assessment of body measurements as predictors of live weight in Ugandan pigs (field work Oct. – Nov. 2013). • Feeding trials assessing local feed resources in Masaka (on going). • Developing of training modules on key topics of the smallholder pig VCs (on going). • Training of extension staff on facilitation of participatory learning (March 2014). • Research results presented in several international meetings and articles published.
    14. 14. Some strategic partners • MAAIF (Department of Livestock Health and Entomology). • NARO / NaLIRRI. • Local governments of Masaka, Mukono and Kamuli (through the District Veterinary Officers). • VEDCO (particularly in Kamuli district). • Makerere University • NAADS (in the three districts where the project operates). • SNV – Uganda • SLU – Sweden • BRAC • Pig Production & Marketing Ltd. • Wambizzi Coop. • The Agro-Empowerment Center • Uganda Piggery Organization (UPO)
    15. 15. Related projects • Safe Food Fair Food (ILRI; donor BMZ-GiZ) (same sites than SPVCD) • Epidemiology of ASF: a pre-requisite to control (ILRI/BeCA; donor AusAID) (Eastern Uganda/ Western Kenya) • Assessing the impact of African Swine Fever in smallholder pig systems and the feasibility of potential interventions (SLU/ILRI; donor SIDA) (Northern Uganda) • Livestock Data Innovation Project (ILRI; donor BM&G) (mainly Central Region) • Factors influencing successful inclusion of small farmers in modern value chains around the Lake Victoria Basin area in Uganda (ILRI/Shoreline Services Ltd.; donor CTA) (Central & South Western Uganda)
    16. 16. Team members • Danilo Pezo – Project Leader/Animal Nutritionist (ILRI) • Emily Ouma – Agricultural Economist (ILRI) • Michel Dione – Animal Health/ Epidemiology (ILRI) • Natalie Carter – Visiting Scientist, PhD student (ILRI) • Ben Lukuyu – Animal Nutritionist (ILRI) • Brigitte Maass – Forage Scientist (CIAT) • Richard Bishop – Molecular Biologist (ILRI) • Karen Marshall –Geneticist (ILRI) From SFFF (under CRP 4.3) • Kristina Rösel – Project Coordinator
    17. 17. CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research for a food secure future. The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish aims to increase the productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems in sustainable ways, making meat, milk and fish more available and affordable across the developing world. CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish livestockfish.cgiar.org

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