Small ruminant value chains for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique
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Small ruminant value chains for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique

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Presented by Ranjitha Puskur at the Workshop on “Creating a people and outcome focused M&E system

Presented by Ranjitha Puskur at the Workshop on “Creating a people and outcome focused M&E system
For imGoats”, Udaipur, India, 14-18 February 2011

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  • Traditional research model – research provides technology to farmer (2) But really much more complex – for adoption, need to ensure there is ‘pull’ with market outlet/demand (3) And the value chain complex of actors/functions required to get the product to the market (4) But also need to ensure there is ‘push’ to support the farmer’s sustained use of the technology through access to a range of inputs and services, and hence need to develop appropriate input value chains (5) Plus sustainable access to knowledge, market into, organizational strategies (6) So much more complex web of actors – and ALL are important – if one is missing, it can threaten uptake and sustainability of system  Need to get everyone interacting
  • Traditional research model – research provides technology to farmer (2) But really much more complex – for adoption, need to ensure there is ‘pull’ with market outlet/demand (3) And the value chain complex of actors/functions required to get the product to the market (4) But also need to ensure there is ‘push’ to support the farmer’s sustained use of the technology through access to a range of inputs and services, and hence need to develop appropriate input value chains (5) Plus sustainable access to knowledge, market into, organizational strategies (6) So much more complex web of actors – and ALL are important – if one is missing, it can threaten uptake and sustainability of system  Need to get everyone interacting

Small ruminant value chains for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique Small ruminant value chains for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique Presentation Transcript

  • Small ruminant value chains for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique Ranjitha Puskur Workshop on “Creating a people and outcome focused M&E system For imGoats”, Udaipur, India, 14-18 February 2011
  • Goal
    • To increase incomes and food security in a sustainable manner by enhancing pro-poor small ruminant value chains in India and Mozambique
    • Purpose
    • To transform goat production and marketing from an ad hoc, risky, informal activity to a sound and profitable enterprise and model that taps into a growing market, largely controlled by and benefiting women and other disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.
  • Objectives
    • To pilot sustainable and replicable organizational and technical models to strengthen goat value chains in India and Mozambique that increase incomes, reduce vulnerability and enhance welfare amongst marginalized groups, including women
    • To document, communicate and promote appropriate evidence-based model(s) for sustainable, pro-poor goat value chains
      • Value Chains, Innovation Platforms and Producer Hubs
      • Learning-oriented M&E
    Proposed approach
  • Inputs & Services Production Processing Marketing Consumers What do we understand as a value chain?
    • Activities, actors and relationships to bring a product through the phases of production and marketing for delivery to customers
    • Purpose is to provide a product of value to customer for which he is willing to pay
      • Value distributed back along the value chain
    • Flexible scope, boundaries
    • Driven by opportunities to add value
    • “ Process in which all types of knowledge (not just scientific and technology) are applied to achieve desired social and economic outcomes”
    • Technological
    • Institutional (way things are routinely done)
    • Organisational
    • Policy
    What is innovation?
  • Innovation
    • Emerges from multiple interactions and joint learning among individuals and organizations
      • possessing different types of knowledge
      • within a particular social, economic, political, policy and institutional context
    • Innovation processes can be enhanced by creating more possibilities for actors to interact - ( key actors along the value chain – innovation platforms )
  • Why do we need to pay attention to innovation as a process? Farmer adopting integrated system R&D Technology Bulker Goat Value Chain ‘ PULL’ Retail markets Supermarkets Restaurants Processor Veterinary services Breeds Feeds Knowledge Market Information Credit Policy Organisational ‘ PUSH’
  • Why do we need to pay attention to innovation as a process? How do we get all of these actors working together to identify problems and co-create solutions as the value chains evolve?
  • Innovation platforms
    • a fluid entity - evolving membership, drawing in relevant expertise depending on the problem being addressed
    • facilitate dialogue between the main local players in the value chain
    • identify bottlenecks and opportunities in production, marketing and the policy environment
    • identify market requirements (quantity, quality, and the timing of sales)
    • analyse existing production strategies
    • identify and implement technologies to improve production to fulfill market demand
    • A hub is a dynamic cluster of services and activities that generate greater income for goat farmers through:
      • Meat and milk sale
      • Purchase of inputs and services (feed, vet services, breeding, etc..)
      • Possibility to save and get credit (“village banks”)
      • Access to training and information
    • The hub approach has been used with other commodities (coffee, cashew nuts) but works best when regular inputs/services are required and production is recurrent
    The HUB approach
    • not a fixed method, approach or specific process
    • the conceptualisation and practice needs to go beyond methods or approaches to include changes of personal skills, mindsets and attitudes, organisational practices and culture, and the ways in which organisations interact as part of the wider “innovation system”
    What this approach is not..
  • Outputs
    • 1.1 Diagnosed technical and capacity needs and opportunities and final jointly-developed strategy for addressing them
    • 1.2 Stakeholder Innovation Platforms (IPs) established , with key stakeholders and women playing a significant role
    • 1.3 Producer Hubs established , with women playing a significant role, and delivering demand-led packages of interventions and capacity building (animal health, animal production, breeding, crop-livestock and natural resource management, business development, marketing, value addition, innovation capacity)
  • Outputs
    • 2.1 Lessons for sustainable goat value chain development models clearly identified through evidence-based research and participatory approaches
    • 2.2 Opportunities for scaling up and out communicated through advocacy activity with partners and through project exit strategy
    • 3.1 Processes established and implemented for adaptive learning through M&E and impact demonstrated through impact assessment exercises
  • Producer Hub establishment Stakeholder engagement Communication Research and Learning Innovation Platform establishment M&E Impact assessment Outputs 2 Years
    • India
      • Rajasthan - Udaipur district – Sarda and Jhadol blocks
      • Jharkhand – Dumka district – Jama block
      • 5000 Households – women’s groups – Tribal
    • Mozambique
      • Inhambane province – Inhassaro district – 20 villages
      • 350 Households – 2500 beneficiaries - 25% FHH, 20% PLWHA
    Project locations and target groups
    • How effective are IPs and GPH as mechanisms to enhance performance of goat value chains?
    • What determines IP, GPH performance?
    • Do they result in equitable and sustainable benefits for the value chain actors?
    • In what contexts and under what conditions can such models be replicated?
    What are our research questions??
  • A hybrid approach to M&E
    • Integration of the Outcome Mapping (OM) approach with the logframe
    • OM is people and outcome-oriented and focuses on behavioral change within those partners that a project or programs aims to influence directly
    • OM can be used to develop a map of what progress towards success would look like in terms of changes in behaviour of, for example, goat producers and other actors in the value chain including traders and actors providing support services and enabling environment, which are not easily handled through the logframe
  • This workshop.. “ Creating a people and outcome focused M&E system for imGoats”
    • Identify the priority areas for the application of OM
    • Create a framework for an M&E system that focuses on these priorities
    • Link to or embed this in the broader project goal (increasing incomes and food security) and logframe objectives related to the piloting and dissemination of organizational and technical models
    • Outline project communication and exit strategies, workplans and other critical elements
    Objectives of the workshop
  • ILRI is creating and integrating knowledge to enable diverse partners to find innovative solutions to make livestock a sustainable pathway out of poverty