Safe Food, Fair Food: Summary of findings within sheep value chains in the Ethiopian Highlands

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Presented by Barbara Rischkowsky, Tamsin Dewe and Krstina Rosel at the Multi-stakeholder Workshop for Targeting Action Research on Small Ruminant Value Chains in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, 14th-15th March …

Presented by Barbara Rischkowsky, Tamsin Dewe and Krstina Rosel at the Multi-stakeholder Workshop for Targeting Action Research on Small Ruminant Value Chains in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, 14th-15th March 2013

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  • 1. Safe Food, Fair Food: Summary of findings within sheep valuechains in the Ethiopian Highlands Barbara Rischkowsky, Tamsin Dewé, Kristina Rösel, Multi-stakeholder Workshop for Targeting Action Research on Small Ruminant Value Chains in Ethiopia Addis Ababa, 14th-15th March 2013
  • 2. Safe Food, Fair Food Protecting the health of poor consumers and Safeguarding livelihoods of poor livestock keepers and other value chain actors
  • 3. Background Looking at risks to food safety and nutrition within sheep and goat value chains Trying to identify opportunities for further research and intervention Ultimate goal is to ensure adequate intake of safe and nutritious foods, while protecting the livelihoods of poor value chain actors
  • 4. Activities Rapid assessment conducted alongside rapid VCA at each site Participatory rural appraisals (PRAs) with producer and consumer groups at Doyogena, Horro and Menz Focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of young children at Doyogena and Horro Topics included animal health, consumption patterns, food preparation, and perceptions of quality and safety of sheep meat
  • 5. Results: all sites Animal health – Disease was an important constraint on production at all sites – Respiratory disease, ‘bottle jaw’ and diarrhoea were major causes of morbidity and mortality Photo credit: Grit/Suzanne Cox
  • 6. Results: all sites Sheep meat consumption patterns – Peaks at major national and religious festivals – Low in intervening periods
  • 7. Results: all sites Risks to safety of sheep meat – Emergency slaughter and consumption of diseased animals occurs – Consumption of raw or lightly cooked meat or offal occurs Risk mitigation – Smell, colour and texture used to assess quality and safety – Cooking ‘suspect’ meat thoroughly Nutritional issues – Lack of meat in the diet
  • 8. Results: Doyogena Sick animals  Deaths
  • 9. Results: Doyogena Risky food practices – Emergency slaughter and consumption of animals with grain overload – Albendazole residues in meat due to use during fattening – Fresh meat stored until next day – Consumption of dulet Risk-mitigating practices – No consumption of animals with other diseases – Careful slaughter practices to avoid contamination – Lesions are trimmed from meat and the remainder is boiled – Meat that might be a health risk is boiled
  • 10. Results: Horro Sick animals  Deaths
  • 11. Results: Horro Risky food practices – Consumption of lightly cooked meat Risk-mitigating practices – Avoiding trauma and stress to the animal before slaughter – Careful butchering to keep offal and muscle meat separate – Meat that might be a health risk is boiled Photo credits: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu
  • 12. Results: Menz Sick animals  Deaths
  • 13. Results: Menz Risky food practices – Emergency slaughter and consumption of animals with specific diseases – Eating of dulet and lightly cooked meat Risk-mitigating practices – Meat is consumed quickly after slaughter, or preserved – Dark or foul-smelling meat is not consumed – Meat that might be a health risk is boiled
  • 14. Conclusions Interventions in animal health are required Risky consumption practices occur at all sites but are often mitigated by thorough cooking Better if all meat and offal is well- cooked - some loss of nutritional quality, but large reduction in risks Infrequent meat consumption probably represents greater risk to nutritional status than to food safety Improving the economic status of households is the first step towards increased meat consumption
  • 15. Safe Food, Fair Food Tamsin Dewé, Consultant tamsindewe@gmail.com Kristina Rösel, Project Co-Ordinator k.rosel@cgiar.org All photo credits to ILRI/ Tamsin Dewé unless otherwise indicated