Research for agricultural approaches in farm to fork management of food safety
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Research for agricultural approaches in farm to fork management of food safety

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Presented by Delia Grace at the Science Forum 2013, Bonn, Germany, 23‒25 September 2013

Presented by Delia Grace at the Science Forum 2013, Bonn, Germany, 23‒25 September 2013

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    Research for agricultural approaches in farm to fork management of food safety Research for agricultural approaches in farm to fork management of food safety Presentation Transcript

    • 1 Research for agricultural approaches in farm to fork management of food safety Delia Grace, Program Leader Food Safety and Zoonoses, ILRI Theme Leader, Agriculture Associated Diseases, CRP A4NH Breakout Session 4 on Food Security Science Forum 2013 Nutrition and health outcomes: targets for agricultural research, Bonn, Germany, 23‒25 September 2013
    • Overview  Agriculture and health – Under and over-nutrition – Food borne disease, emerging infections – Disease-ogenic environments, direct zoonoses, occupational disease  Food safety (FS) – Wet markets, wastes and high value foods – Toxins that target the poor  Rationale for farm to fork approaches to FS – From punishment to prevention – Zoonotic reservoirs  Research to support agricultural approaches to FS – Mapping and measuring multiple burdens – Innovations, incentives and institutions for management
    • Agriculture & health  7 billion people – 2 billion with hidden hunger – 0.9 billion hungry – 1.5 billion overweight or obese – 5 billion sickened from the food they eat – 2 billion exposed to farm hazards
    • All deaths in early 2000s 57,000,000 Deaths from infectious disease 18,000,000 Child deaths in which malnutrition implicated 5,000,000 Diarrhoeal disease deaths 3,000,000 HIV deaths (emerged from animals) 2,000,000 Road traffic deaths 1,200,000 Deaths from zoonoses 500,000 Child deaths from malnutrition 250,000 Fatal agricultural injuries 170,000 Liver cancer deaths due to aflatoxins 70,000 Extreme weather related deaths 20,000 Under and over-nutrition Food borne disease, emerging infections Disease-ogenic environments, direct zoonoses, occupational disease Ag + Health
    • 5 Consumption, sanitation, child care, contact animals, disease-ogenic environment Gut microbiome, exposure to toxins, repeated infections, environmental enteropathy Stunting, sickness, non- communicable disease Food Safet y Toxins that target the poor Wet markets & waste water
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    • Mapping & measuring the multiple burdens of FOOD BORNE DISEASE
    • 12  Growing concern over food safety but poor estimation of risk and little understanding of the benefits of smallscale & informal systems  Which support livelihoods & nutrition of millions: especially women  And supermarkets more risky than wet markets  Often more animal-origin pathogens in vegetables than meat  Hazard does not mean risk:  High levels of brucellosis irrelevant to health where milk is boiled  Regulation largely ineffective and sometimes counterproductive  Food safety assurance as income generation  More harassment by authorities = fewer good practices  Solutions often simple, cheap and effective Assessing for insight
    • Innovations, incentives and institutions for managing food borne disease • Train, brand, certify informal actors • Develop & test technologies Photo: Chiang Mai One Health Center • Photo: • Women butchers in Ibadan: sell safer meat than men butchers Photo: Cysticercosis diagnostic • Capacity development
    • THE CORE PROBLEM THE CAUSES Lost opportunities for smallholders in markets Limited access to inputs Inappropriate scale & technologies Lack of market information Dysfunctiona l pricing & markets Inappropriate food- safety assessment, management & policy Threatened market access Limited value addition Low productivity Health risks in food Lost income Food insecurityHidden hunger WHOLE VALUE CHAIN INPUTS/SERVICES PRODUCTION MARKETINGPROCESSIN G CONSUMPTION High wastage & spoilage Unsafe food Poverty Disease THE IMPACTS CRP 4.3 Commodity & system CRP
    • Agriculture Associated Diseases http://aghealth.wordpress.com/