Poultry value chain development                                                                                           ...
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Poultry value chain development: Interventions and lessons

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Poster for the ‘Market-Oriented Smallholder Development: IPMS Experience-Sharing Workshop,’ Addis Ababa, 2-3 June 2011

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Poultry value chain development: Interventions and lessons

  1. 1. Poultry value chain development interventions and lessons  Initial diagnosis Knowledge management Value chain interventions  • Market potential of poultry was recognized by farmers, local  and capacity development  traders and restaurants. News of Avian Flu was a major reason for  delay in development at project start Input supply interventions  • Inadequate knowledge and skills on commercial poultry  production systems among value chain actors • Poultry rearing and selling of products was mostly done by  women Knowledge sharing through group  • Egg production of local poultry systems was poor due to small  discussions and demonstrations  number of chicks, high mortality resulting from poor disease  control and feeding practices  Testing of incubators for semi  Supply of  day old chicks  commercial poultry  and hay box brooder • Input supply system, including day old chicks, pullets, veterinary  production   services, and supply of feed was poorly developed • Farmers were price takers. Eggs were sold mostly to consumer or  traders/collectors • Local producers had very few linkages with other value chain  Access to knowledge  through training, study  actors tours  and farmer field days  Vaccination services for  Linkage with poultry feed  supplier  from Jimma dairy  Value chain actors, service providers  day old chicks  farmers  and linkages  Input supply/ services National veterinary  institute  Local shop Production interventions  Feed processors Commercial poultry  farms Pullet producers  Introduction of  semi  commercial egg  Additional ICT supported  production to respond  information/knowledge via Ethiopian  to market demands  Agriculture Portal (EAP) www.eap.gov.et  Knowledge/ Skill Credit  Office of agriculture  Microfinance  institutions Poultry   Universities  Private industry producers Private sectors,  Shops Cooperatives Specialized farmers Targeting Students   Engaging women in  semi commercial  poultry and egg  production  Market Local market Universities  Restaurants Targeting women and farmers with  entrepreneurial skillsProcessing / marketing interventions  Lessons and challenges • Knowledge sharing, training, follow up of interventions, and partner linkages contribute to improving the skills and knowledge of value chain actors and service providers, including women • Rapid market assessments are helpful in identifying potential markets • Village level egg hatching has not resulted in a viable and sustainable system • Farmers can profitably produce pullets from day old chicks, for own use or sale if appropriate linkages with Eggs supplied for  veterinary services and feed suppliers are established Introduction of chicken meat  local and urban  processing and marketing to  markets restaurants  • Farmers with larger number of birds easily took up advanced production practices including housing, feeding and disease control • Farmers (including women) can administer vaccines. However, sustainability of the supply depends on establishment of dealerships linked to vaccine producers • Improved feed supply can be initiated through collective action, cooperatives, or ago dealerships • Credit availability to establish medium sized poultry enterprises was successful – especially for women Linking with urban poultry  traders  This document is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution‐Noncommercial‐Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

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