Potential and limitations of by-product  based feeding systems to mitigate green house gases for improved livestock produc...
<ul><li>Part 1: By-products and feeding </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Importance of by-products (basal diet) a...
Key feed sources in India: 2003   and 2020 (summarized from NIANP, 2005 and Ramachandra et al., 2007 ) Feed Resource % Cro...
Stover digestibility and grain yield in sorghum  cultivars release-tested between   2002 and 2007 Blümmel et al. (2009)
Sorghum stover trading in Hyderabad
Relation between price of sorghum  stover and  in vitro  digestibility Premium Stover Low Cost Stover Blümmel and Parthasa...
Premium and lost cost sorghum digestibility (OMD), digestible intake (DOMI) and nitrogen balance (N-Balance) in sheep  Rao...
Feed block manufacturing: supplementation, densification Courtesy: Miracle Fodder and Feeds PVT LTD Ingredients % Sorghum ...
Comparisons of premium and low cost  sorghum stover based complete    feed blocks in dairy buffalo Anandan et al. (2009a) ...
Supplementation and processing of  sweet sorghum bagasse and  response in sheep   Anandan et al. (2009b) Mash Pellets Bloc...
<ul><li>By-products and feeding </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving by-produ...
<ul><li>Part 2: Interaction of livestock numbers, productivity level, feed requirements and CH 4  emissions </li></ul><ul>...
 
Milch Animal, Livestock Population and  their average Milk Production(2005-06) Milch animals Total animals Milk yield x 10...
Milch Animals and their Energy Needs  for Maintenance and Production  Metabolizable energy required MJ x 10 9 Maintenance ...
Feed energy needs of milch animals in dependence of average daily milk yields ME required (MJ x 10 9 ) Milk (kg/d) Mainten...
* Calculated based on Component Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) Livestock revolution: Impact on energy  and feed requirements 36...
Interaction of livestock  numbers,  productivity level, feed requirements and CH 4  emissions     Conclusions   <ul><li>St...
Thank you for your attention!
Storage Balanced  Nutrition Transportation Local Resource Utilization ECONOMICAL Courtesy  of  Lakshmi  Shah  Fortificatio...
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Potential and limitations of by-product based feeding systems to mitigate green house gases for improved livestock productivity

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Presentation by M. Blümmel, S. Anandan, and C.S. Prasad to the 13th Biennial Animal Nutrition Conference of the Animal Nutrition Society of India: Diversification of Animal Nutrition Research in the Changing Scenario, Bangalore, India, 17-19 December 2009.

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Potential and limitations of by-product based feeding systems to mitigate green house gases for improved livestock productivity

  1. 1. Potential and limitations of by-product based feeding systems to mitigate green house gases for improved livestock productivity Blümmel M., Anandan S. Prasad C. S. 1 International Livestock Research Institute, c/o ICRISAT, Patancheru 502324, AP, India 2 National Institute of Animal Nutrition and Physiology, Bangalore 560030 India 3 Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Animal Science Division New Delhi-110 114. India 13 th Biennial Animal Nutrition Conference of the Animal Nutrition Society of India: Diversification of Animal Nutrition Research in the Changing Scenario Bangalore, India, 17-19 December 2009
  2. 2. <ul><li>Part 1: By-products and feeding </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Importance of by-products (basal diet) as </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>feed resource </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improvement of by-products at source (example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sorghum value chain) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impact from improved by-products </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improvement of by-product based feeding through </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>processing </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Key feed sources in India: 2003 and 2020 (summarized from NIANP, 2005 and Ramachandra et al., 2007 ) Feed Resource % Crop Residues Planted fodder crops 2003 2020 44.2 69.0 34.1 ? Greens (F/F/CPR/WL) 17.8 ? Concentrates 3.9 7.3
  4. 4. Stover digestibility and grain yield in sorghum cultivars release-tested between 2002 and 2007 Blümmel et al. (2009)
  5. 5. Sorghum stover trading in Hyderabad
  6. 6. Relation between price of sorghum stover and in vitro digestibility Premium Stover Low Cost Stover Blümmel and Parthasarathy, 2006
  7. 7. Premium and lost cost sorghum digestibility (OMD), digestible intake (DOMI) and nitrogen balance (N-Balance) in sheep Rao and Blümmel (2009) g/d g/kg LW/d -0.5 b 10.2 b 51.5 b Low Cost 1.2 a 12.5 a 58.1 a Premium N-Balance. DOMI OMD
  8. 8. Feed block manufacturing: supplementation, densification Courtesy: Miracle Fodder and Feeds PVT LTD Ingredients % Sorghum stover 50 Bran/husks/hulls 18 Oilcakes 18 Molasses 8 Grains 4 Minerals, vitamins, urea 2
  9. 9. Comparisons of premium and low cost sorghum stover based complete feed blocks in dairy buffalo Anandan et al. (2009a) Block Premium Block Low Cost CP 17.2 % 17.1% ME (MJ/kg) 8.46 MJ/kg 7.37 MJ/kg DMI 19.7 kg/d 18.0 kg/d DMI per kg LW 3.6 % 3.3 % Milk 7.9 kg/d 7.0 kg/d Milk Potential 16.6 kg/d 11.8 kg/d
  10. 10. Supplementation and processing of sweet sorghum bagasse and response in sheep Anandan et al. (2009b) Mash Pellets Block Control Chaffed SSBRL Concentrate DMI (g/kg LW) 52.5 a 55.6 a 42.1 b 41.5 b ADG (g / d) 132.7 a 130.4 a 89.5 b 81.3 b Processing ($/t) 5.9 7.0 5.2 1.7 Transport ($/t/100km) 6.6 5.8 5.2 13.5 Feed cost ($/kg LW gain) 1.3 1.4 1.6 1.6
  11. 11. <ul><li>By-products and feeding </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving by-products at source of considerable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>strategic importance for livestock feeding </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated breeding, supplementation, processing, transport strategies required </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respectable level of livestock productivity achievable in by-product based feeding systems </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Part 2: Interaction of livestock numbers, productivity level, feed requirements and CH 4 emissions </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Livestock numbers, milk production and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>feed requirements for maintenance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and production of milch animals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities from increasing per animal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>milk production and its constraints </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Livestock revolution and implications </li></ul></ul>
  13. 14. Milch Animal, Livestock Population and their average Milk Production(2005-06) Milch animals Total animals Milk yield x 10 3 kg/d Cross Bred 8 216 28 391 6.44 Local 28 370 155 805 1.97 Buffalo 33 137 101 253 4.40
  14. 15. Milch Animals and their Energy Needs for Maintenance and Production Metabolizable energy required MJ x 10 9 Maintenance Production Cross Bred 148.0 122.6 Local 423.3 136.4 Buffalo 601.2 370.8 Total 1 172.5 629.8
  15. 16. Feed energy needs of milch animals in dependence of average daily milk yields ME required (MJ x 10 9 ) Milk (kg/d) Maintenance Production Total 3.61 (05/06) 1247.6 573.9 1821.5 6 (Scenario 1) 749.9 573.9 1323.8 9 (Scenario 2) 499.9 573.9 1073.8 12 (Scenario 3) 374.9 573.9 948.8 15 (Scenario 4) 299.9 573.9 873.9
  16. 17.
  17. 18.
  18. 19.
  19. 20. * Calculated based on Component Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) Livestock revolution: Impact on energy and feed requirements 364.57 2683.22 1075.00 1608.22 89920 * 5.24 172 2020 (2005-06) 2020 (fixed LP Milk (million tons) 91.8 172 yield/day (kg) 3.6 6.76 Numbers (000) 69759 69759 Metabolizable energy requirements (MJ x 10 9 ) Maintenance 1247.64 1247.6 Production 573.94 1075.00 total 1821.58 23266.6 Feed Req.( m tons) 247.50 315.6
  20. 21. Interaction of livestock numbers, productivity level, feed requirements and CH 4 emissions Conclusions <ul><li>Strategies for increasing per animal milk productivity highest effects on resource use, feed requirements and greenhouse emissions </li></ul><ul><li>At available feed qualities of 7.4 to 8.5 MJ ME/kg and intakes of 3.2 to 3.6% of LW daily milk yields of </li></ul><ul><li>about 9 to 12 l are achievable. </li></ul><ul><li>Higher levels questionable because of lack of concentrates </li></ul>
  21. 22. Thank you for your attention!
  22. 23. Storage Balanced Nutrition Transportation Local Resource Utilization ECONOMICAL Courtesy of Lakshmi Shah Fortification and Densification

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