Participatory rural appraisal of livestock diseases amongst a Fulani community in central Nigeria
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Participatory rural appraisal of livestock diseases amongst a Fulani community in central Nigeria

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Presented by Bolajoko, M.B., Moses, G.D., Gambari-Bolajoko, K.O., Ifende, V.I., Emenna, P. and Bala, A. at the PENAPH First Technical Workshop, Chiangmai, Thailand, 11 – 13 December 2012.

Presented by Bolajoko, M.B., Moses, G.D., Gambari-Bolajoko, K.O., Ifende, V.I., Emenna, P. and Bala, A. at the PENAPH First Technical Workshop, Chiangmai, Thailand, 11 – 13 December 2012.

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Participatory rural appraisal of livestock diseases amongst a Fulani community in central Nigeria Participatory rural appraisal of livestock diseases amongst a Fulani community in central Nigeria Presentation Transcript

  • Participatory rural appraisal oflivestock diseases amongst a Fulani community in central NigeriaPENAPH First Technical Workshop, Dec 11-13, Chiang MaiBolajoko M. B., Moses G. D., Gambari-Bolajoko K. O., Ifende V. I., Emenna P. and Bala A.
  • IntroductionParticipatory rural appraisal (PRA) evolved fromrapid rural appraisal (RRA)RRA: rapid collection of data by non-members ofthe community for comprehensive understandingof the rural situation
  • Introduction contPRA: intensive, systematic, but semi-structuredmethod of having an overview and analyses ofthe prevailing situation in community with thecommunity actively involved in the process.
  • Objectives studyOverview of the livestock health problems andtheir management by the Fulanisdetect disease or health problems ofimportance to communityprevalence or incidence
  • Methods ChecklistAppraisal team Introduction of appraisal teamA translator Identify respondentsTwo epidemiologists Types of livestock reared & husbandry systemsA clinician Identification & description of atA sociologist least 3 diseases for each livestock Grazing location/pattern Visual & Physical examination Proportional piling exercise
  • Methods contApproximately 30% of theFulani community wererandomly visited duringstudy www.farmafrica.org/what-we-do/what-we-doAmong techniques of PRA:Open-ended interviewwith respondents, transect& proportional piling http://www.unmillenniumproject.org/mv/mv_closer.htm
  • Methods contSourced information were recordedas non-numeric, non-categoricaltestimonies from oral explanationsof respondentsIterative analyses http://asapafrica.blogspot.it/2009_01_01_archive.htmlParticipatory (probing,triangulation) analysesSamples and ticks were collectedduring visits for laboratorydiagnosis & identification http://www.dfid.gov.uk/r4d/PDF/Outputs/ClimateChange/jotoafrika_7.pdf
  • ResultsMost important: Haemorrhagic septicaemiaMost prevalent: Babesiosis & contagious bovinepleuro pneumonia (CBPP)Other health problems: Newcastle disease(ND), fascioliasis, brucellosis, tick & tsetse flyinfestation.
  • Results contHigh incidence of conjunctivitis and fever among theFulani communities usually accompanies tickInfestation in both cattle and goatMajor challenge: limited water supply particularlyover the dry season> 90% of the respondents do not seek veterinaryconsultation
  • Results contCommunity had no specific grazing lands allocated forgrazingIncrease in the incidence of diseases during the rainyseasonLab confirmations: infectious bursa disease (poultry),CBPP, babesiosis, ND, fascioliasis, brucellosis & tickinfestationFulanis, not effectively integrated into the nation’slivestock disease control & health maintenance system
  • DiscussionPRA, a useful tool for reliable data collection: onspatiotemporal prevalence or incidence of diseasesand to inform research design & goal.PRA can be used to liaise with, empower &integrate the rural or remotely located livestock-owning communities in the control of animaldiseases.
  • ConclusionThis study reiterates the benefits of PRA,particularly in improving the detection &understanding of problems faced by farmers.Proving to be an indispensable tool forsustainable disease control, rural developmentparticularly in developing nations.
  • AcknowledgementThe Executive Director, National VeterinaryResearch InstituteHOD, Extension and Research LiaisonDivisionDr (Mrs.) Maryam MuhammedThe respondents during the study and ourtranslator
  • Thank you for listening