Napier Stunt and Smut Resistance Project in Kenya: achievements and outcomes
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Napier Stunt and Smut Resistance Project in Kenya: achievements and outcomes

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A presentation prepared by M. Mulaa, C. Lusweti, B. Awalla, C. Kute, D. Asena, S. Rono, F. Muyekho, J. Hanson and J. Proud for the ASARECA/ILRI Workshop on Mitigating the Impact of Napier Grass Smut ...

A presentation prepared by M. Mulaa, C. Lusweti, B. Awalla, C. Kute, D. Asena, S. Rono, F. Muyekho, J. Hanson and J. Proud for the ASARECA/ILRI Workshop on Mitigating the Impact of Napier Grass Smut and Stunt Diseases, Addis Ababa, June 2-3, 2010.

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Napier Stunt and Smut Resistance Project in Kenya: achievements and outcomes Napier Stunt and Smut Resistance Project in Kenya: achievements and outcomes Presentation Transcript

  • M. Mulaa 1 , C. Lusweti 1 , B. Awalla 1 , C. Kute, D. Asena 1 S. Rono 1 , F. Muyekho 2 , J. Hanson 3 and J. Proud 3 1 KARI Kitale, 2 KARI Kakamega, 3 ILRI Ethiopia Presented at the ASARECA/ILRI Workshop on Mitigating the Impact of Napier Grass Smut and Stunt Diseases, Addis Ababa, June 2-3, 2010 NAPIER STUNT AND SMUT RESISTANCE PROJECT IN KENYA Achievements and Outcomes
  • KARI Vision KARI envisions “a vibrant commercially-oriented and competitive agricultural sector propelled by science, technology and innovation”. Introduction
  • KARI Mission To contribute to increased productivity, commercialization and competitiveness of the agricultural sector through generation and promotion of knowledge, information and technologies that respond to clients’ demands and opportunities. Introduction
  • Opportunities Napier is a major livestock feed in Kenya with several uses -Stem borer and Striga control (Push-pull) -Augementation of natural enemies -Soil conservation -Sold for cash Introduction
  • Introduction ……. Napier potential yields 50-100 tons green matter per hectare
  • Stunt and Smut major diseases of Napier Margaret Mulaa CRAC Presentation 7- April- 2009 Napier Stunt and Smut Resistant Clones and effective Management strategies demanded by farmers
  • Problem statement
    • Most Napier varieties are susceptible to stunt and smut
    • Decline in biomass due to stunt leads to
      • Loss of farmer income from sale of milk
      • High prices of Napier
      • Farmers selling their diary cows
    • Graze dairy cattle on sparse communal pastures
      • East Coast Fever
      • High costs of livestock production
  • Launch of the project
    • 11 July 2008 at KARI Kakamega
    • 150 stakeholders attended the Launch
    KARI Director, ILRI Director Partnerships, Director Livestock Development, CD’s KARI Kitale&KARI Kakamega
  • PROJECT VISION
    • Farmers adoption of superior (resistant) clones and crop management practices that will mitigate the spread of smut and stunt, leading to increases in system productivity and sustainability
  • PROJECT MISSION
    • Sharing new information and knowledge to support practices that will prevent the diseases spread and allow farmers to make informed choices
  • Achievements
    • Stunt and Smut Disease Incidence and Severity mapped in
    • Bungoma
    • Mumias
    • Butere
    • Busia
    • Kiambu
    • Muranga
  • Global positioning system reading were taken from all house holds surveyed
  • Stunt and Smut incidence in Western Kenya mapped
  • Other Baseline Data on Napier Production Practices from survey
    • Area covered by Napier Grass per household
    • Number of Improved Diary Cattle
    • Feeding systems practiced
    • Alternative feeds
  • Baselines on disease incidence in Western and Central Kenya in 2008 District Stunt District Stunt on farmers own fields Smut District Smut on farmers own fields Bungoma 89.7 27.3 5.2 7.7 Mumias 96.4 21.0 4.8 5.1 Butere 98.0 26.0 1.0 1.3 Busia 87.3 18.1 2.5 2.6 Kiambu 20.7 4.7 37.9 42.3 Muranga 12.9 2.9 37.6 41.0
  • Biomass Studies
  • Morphological Characterization of 120 clones
  • Screening 120 clones for tolerance to Stunt
      • Data on Incidence and Severity of stunt on Clones available
    1-Nil (No symptoms at all in stool) 2- Mild (less than 25 % of tillers with symptoms) 3- Moderate (25-50 tillers with symptoms) 4- Severe- more than 50 tillers with symptoms) Stunt Severity
  • Screen house trials under artificial Challenge
  • High yielding Clones tolerant to stunting Disease identified
    • Collected 600 Clones
    • 20 Clones tolerant
    • 28 clones yielding more than Bana
    Clone (Detail of clones with author) Dry Matter Yields tons/Ha 1 12.76 2 12.43 3 11.04 4 10.06 5 8.09 6 7.64 7 7.55 8 6.03
  • Farmer evaluating and Ranking Napier Clones at Alupe
  • Clones Ranked a among the best by both farmers and Researchers
    • Farmers preferred clones which were high yielding, disease tolerant, fast growing with more tillers, big stems, smooth and broad leaves.
    • MMS 2A5 (11.04 tons/ha)
    • MMS 3A5 (8.56 tons/ha)
    • BGM 3A5 (8.09 tons/ha)
  • Information and Monitoring & Evaluation activities
    • Assessing and responding to stakeholders information needs
    • Documenting processes
    • Packaging and disseminating information
    • Maintaining relevance
    • Assessing lessons learnt
    • Monitoring impact against indicators
  • Stakeholder Identification KARI Media Private Sector Other Researchers Schools Universities CBO’s Local Leaders NGO’s Farmers Extension System
  • Assessing and responding to stakeholders information needs
      • Focus group discussions (6)
      • Key informant meetings (6)
      • Stakeholder workshops (8)
      • Field days and Agricultural Shows (4)
      • Dissemination materials
      • - Posters (3)
      • - Leaflets (2)
  • Number of Farmers Reached Districts Field days Workshops Bungoma Choisiana Kanduyi 500 1060 100 50 Mumias East Wanga Matungu 600 260 87 76 Kiambu Kiamba 1500 870 195 400 Muranga 243 55 Kitale Total 1053 6086 40 1003 (7089)
  • Reduction in Disease Incidence
    • Bungoma 45% Management (Clinics)
    • Mumias 60 % awareness Workshops/FD
    • Butere 30% Tolerant Land Races
    • Busia 70% No serious Management
    • Central 15% More Aware of Tolerant Varieties KK1& KK2
  • Key Informant Meetings Leaders of Community Based Organizations in Bungoma District
  • Documenting processes/ Synthesizing information for the Web
    • Quarterly reports (4)
    • Project Annual Reports (2)
    • Project Semi-Annual Reports (6)
    • Reports of stakeholders meetings (8)
    • Centre Advisory Committee meetings reports (1)
    • Back to office reports on field visits (30)
  • Packaging and disseminating Information
      • Awareness creation on management of the disease
      • 3 Posters and 2 Leaflets
      • 2 video’s ( Project launch & Field day)
      • 5 news paper articles (Nation, Standard, Kenya times)
      • TV news (KTN, Nation and KBC)
  • Packaging and disseminating information
    • Production of good leaflets and posters
    • Collaboration with Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock
    • Collaboration with projects dealing with Livestock Technologies
    • - IFAD
    • - SNV Swedish Project
    • - Small holders giving credit
    • - USAID Kenya Dairy Sector project
    • - Land O’Lakes International Development
  • Maintaining Relevance
    • Farmer Group discussions (4)
    • Project Annual planning meeting (3)
    • Farmer to Farmer visits (3)
    • Farmer Field days in collaboration with other stakeholders (4)
  • Stakeholder field day at Alupe
  • Stakeholder Workshops and meetings
    • Information Sharing Meeting with Policy makers
  • Assessing Lessons Learnt
    • Farmer Group discussions
    • Monitoring meetings held with farmers
    • - Munanda-ini
    • - Thindigna
    • - Kiamba settlement
    • - Njiku development focal area
    • - Kimoroni
    • - East Wanga
    • - Matungu
    • - Choisiana
    • Demonstrations (Bulking sites)
  • Assessing Lessons Learnt
    • Monitoring Meetings Demonstrations
  • Behavioral changes in partners Key Boundary Partner Expected Key changes Actual changes observed during project implementation Extension Staff
    • participatory extension methods
    • More technology demonstrations
    • More linkages
    • Involved farmers in planning and information gathering
    • Used funds from other sources for field days
    • Stunting/smut disease made priority
    • Involved in participatory training
    Farmers -Updated information on disease -Demanding to technologies -Participating in collection of resistant Germplasm -Farmer-to-farmer technology transfer -Adoption of improved disease free Napier clones
    • -Several farmers were interested and demanded for tolerant materials
    • -Made effort to gather information
    • -Demanded for leaflets and Posters
    • Very keen to attend field days
    • Adoption of Management of management technologies and reduction of incidence of stunting disease
  • Behavioral changes in partners (Contd.) Key Boundary Partner Expected Key changes Actual changes observed during project implementation Researchers
    • Hold workshops/field days to disseminate information
    • Provide guidelines on management of disease
    • Develop more proposals
    • -More team work
    • -More collections of Clones
    • -Created networks
    • Preparing posters
    • Writing Papers
    • -Persuaded bosses to fund
    KARI HQ -Promote and Coordinate linkages between related projects -Director KARI attended the launch and field days -Supported project with additional funding -Participated in monitoring
  • Behavioral changes in partners (Contd.) Key Boundary Partner Expected Key changes Actual changes observed during project implementation Media -Disseminating the correct information
    • Project launch in the nation newspaper and on 3 T.V. channels
    • Radio interested in hosting the farmers
    Policy makers -Support the transformations -Minister of Agriculture and other policy makers attended field days and supported the project -Chiefs and village elders helped create awareness among communities
  • Linkages and collaboration Collaborators/Donor Activities/Comments
    • Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Livestock Extension (NALEP/Dutch Government
    Covers over 20 districts in disseminating information and helping groups bulk clean planting materials
    • East African Small holder Dairy Project (ASARECA/World bank)
    Extending Technologies that will empower small holder farmers e.g. clean seed production, Conservation of fodders, crop/livestock integration ICIPE Push Pull Project (Kilimo Trust) Dissemination of Push Pull Habitat Management Strategies, disseminate information on management of stunting disease and smut.
  • Lessons learnt
    • Involvement of various stakeholders increased awareness on disease and technology dissemination
    • Linking with existing projects related to Napier production made the project sustainable
    • Team work at KARI and at regional level improved performance and project implementation
  • Lessons learnt Cont.
    • Farmer workshops, Farmer visits and field-days were the most effective means of disseminating information
    • Media played a very big role in Awareness creation and dissemination of the technologies
    • Farmers and other stakeholders should be trained in information gathering to help monitor impacts of the project
  • The way Forwards
    • Evaluate identified tolerant clones in more sites and recommend to farmers
    • Need to conduct further research to standardize screening methodologies using artificial Challenge
    • Further evaluation of identified clones to develop resistant varieties to Napier Stunting disease
  • The way Forwards
    • Introduction of resistant genes into the existing germplasm with desirable traits
    • Identify partners who would assist in the sensitization and dissemination of management strategies
    • Establishment of bulking sites to produce Clean planting materials for farmers
    • Scale up other stunt and smut management practices such as use of Botanical extracts
    •  
    • Acknowledgement
    • Director KARI and ASARECA
    • C D’s KARI-Kitale and KARI- Kakamega
    • ILRI
    • Plant Global Clinic, UK
    • Rothamsted Research Institute
    • Ministry of Agriculture & Ministry of livestock
    • Farmers and Other stakeholders
    • Project Partners
  • Partners in Napier stunting Disease Research
  • THANK YOU