Meat and live animals value   chain development           IPMS and partners experiences            Gebremedhin WoldewahidP...
AcknowledgementsResearch and Development Partners Farmers, decision makers MoA/BoARD/OoARD Federal and Regional Researc...
Presentation outline 1. Introduction 2. Main diagnostic findings 3. Main value chain interventions 4. Results 5. Impact ac...
1. IntroductionTraditional fattening:• Traditionally, ruminant fattening common in Ethiopia.• Sale of oxen after plowing a...
1. Introduction…IPMS and partners introduced a new intervention approach-system level to make use of the existing livestoc...
1. Introduction…The new intervention approach-fattening systemcomponent integrated with value chain.                      ...
1. Introduction… The new intervention approach:Fattening system components/value chain integratedwith knowledge/capacity d...
2. Main diagnostic findings• Subsistence oriented production system  with little or no use of improved technologies• High ...
2. Main diagnostic findings…Value chain   Potentials               LimitationsMarketing     Local and export         Lacks...
3. Main value chain interventions    3.1 Extension Knowledge    EAP/WKC/FTCs    Study tours/field days    Student thes...
3. Main value chain interventions…     3.2 Production Short term commercial fattening of small and large    ruminants (fe...
3. Main value chain interventions…    3.3 Input/service delivery Forage seed multiplication–FTCs, farmers/private Produc...
3. Main value chain interventions…  3.4 Processing/marketing Market assessment studies Price information collection/deli...
4. Results Fodder intervention in grazing area successful and  resulted in significant increases in quantity and  quality...
4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Harvest frequency                   Jan                                  June     Sept
4. Results…4.1 Feed development…Harvesting frequency
4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Harvest frequency
4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Starting position (Wo)Growth               II       III         Improvedrate            I...
4. Results…4.1 Feed development…Forage quantity
4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Quality and diversityChanges in botanical composition:  • Mix of grasses and legume speci...
4. Results…  4.2 Fattening uptake and income…LRSource: Household survey data (2009)Note: a Cash outlay is expenditure on p...
4. Results…  4.3 Gender and environmentGender Access to communal resources in forage production Use improved feeding (83...
4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Ground cover, compaction, more diversity
4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Flowers for bees
4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Gully stabilization, surface/groundwaterdevelopment
5. Impact across IPMS PLWs5.1 Fattening uptake and income: LR
5. Impact across IPMS PLWs…                     5.1 Fattened oxen                    50000                    45000 Fatten...
5. Impact…5.1 Fattening income…LR                       30000000                       25000000    Total revenue/yr       ...
5. Impact…                      5.1 Fattening beneficiaries…LR                     25000                     22500Benefici...
5. Impact…  5.2 Fattening uptake and income: SR
5. Impact…5.2 Fattened shoats                     350000                     300000 Fattened shoat/yr                     ...
5. Impact…                      5.2 Fattening income of shoats                      12000000                      10000000...
4. Impacts…5.2 Fattening beneficiaries of shoats      Beneficiary HHs/yr   60000                           50000          ...
6. Lessons and challenges Breed improvement system      Choice of breeds (local, exotic, cross breed)      Breeding sys...
6. Lessons and challenges…                              Knowledge                    Health    managementBreed        Live...
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Meat and live animals value chain development: IPMS and partners experiences

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Presented by Gebremedhin Woldewahid at the 19th Ethiopian Society of Animal production Annual Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 15-17 December 2011.

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Meat and live animals value chain development: IPMS and partners experiences

  1. 1. Meat and live animals value chain development IPMS and partners experiences Gebremedhin WoldewahidPresented at the 19th Ethiopian Society of Animal production Annual Conference Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 15-17 December 2011
  2. 2. AcknowledgementsResearch and Development Partners Farmers, decision makers MoA/BoARD/OoARD Federal and Regional Research Institutes/Centers NGOs IPMS-ILRI as facilitator
  3. 3. Presentation outline 1. Introduction 2. Main diagnostic findings 3. Main value chain interventions 4. Results 5. Impact across IPMS PLWs 6. Lessons and challenges
  4. 4. 1. IntroductionTraditional fattening:• Traditionally, ruminant fattening common in Ethiopia.• Sale of oxen after plowing and shoats during holidays and as sources of cash but with little or no investment.  Contribution to smallholders income is insignificant, food insecurity/food aid.Business oriented fattening: Not very common in EthiopiaPotentials for fattening of livestock do exist:  large number of livestock,  high market demand and  ecologically suitable
  5. 5. 1. Introduction…IPMS and partners introduced a new intervention approach-system level to make use of the existing livestock potentials Health Breed Livestock Fattening system Feed
  6. 6. 1. Introduction…The new intervention approach-fattening systemcomponent integrated with value chain. Marketing Health Processing Breed Livestock Production Fattening technology system Input Feed supply/credit
  7. 7. 1. Introduction… The new intervention approach:Fattening system components/value chain integratedwith knowledge/capacity development. Skill development Health Breed Capacity development Feed Documentation
  8. 8. 2. Main diagnostic findings• Subsistence oriented production system with little or no use of improved technologies• High mortality due to disease and feed shortage• Inadequate input/service delivery system for vet services, feed, credit and risk absorption• Lack of knowledge and linkages with value chain actors
  9. 9. 2. Main diagnostic findings…Value chain Potentials LimitationsMarketing Local and export Lacks market information market demand for and linkages meat and liveProcessing Live/meat, No information on what concentrate/local feed consumers prefer for?Production Availability of Skills on breed technologies on breed adaptability vs. FS, type, feed and health forage development and vet services limitedInput Large area for forage Wide spread foragesupply/credit development, vet shortage, inadequate vet service and breed services and breed supply selection
  10. 10. 3. Main value chain interventions 3.1 Extension Knowledge  EAP/WKC/FTCs  Study tours/field days  Student thesis Skills  Training participatory market oriented development – gender balanced  Involvement of specialized staff from research, regional bureaus, consultants, farmers Linkages  Woreda Advisory and Learning committees  Fattening and/or forage platforms  Business linkages between value chain actors and service providers
  11. 11. 3. Main value chain interventions… 3.2 Production Short term commercial fattening of small and large ruminants (feed lot approach) Shelter/housing Planted back yard/irrigated fodder grasses & legumes, Grazing area improvements (clearance, enclosures, cut and carry – individual, communal) Fodder treatment – crop residues, chopping Feeding – supplementary feeding, UMB Breeds – Boran for meat/milk, improved local sheep breeds (Bonga, Washera) Health – de-worming at start of fattening period
  12. 12. 3. Main value chain interventions… 3.3 Input/service delivery Forage seed multiplication–FTCs, farmers/private Producers of UMB Creating linkages between concentrate suppliers and producers Community breeding schemes for small ruminants Controlled breeding in communal and private herds and bull stations for large ruminants Mass insemination of large ruminants Community based trips control Credit for commercial fattening Community based insurance scheme
  13. 13. 3. Main value chain interventions… 3.4 Processing/marketing Market assessment studies Price information collection/delivery system Linking producers to terminal markets Collective marketing action Cattle fairs
  14. 14. 4. Results Fodder intervention in grazing area successful and resulted in significant increases in quantity and quality of feed resources Crop residue treatment not well adopted Short term fattening of oxen profitable for smallholders Short term fattening of small ruminants profitable but requires medium scale herds (5-10) Credit and community based insurance can work Women can benefit from small ruminants fattening and can graduate to ox fattening/other businesses
  15. 15. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Harvest frequency Jan June Sept
  16. 16. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development…Harvesting frequency
  17. 17. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Harvest frequency
  18. 18. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Starting position (Wo)Growth II III Improvedrate I Wo Traditional to Time (months)
  19. 19. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development…Forage quantity
  20. 20. 4. Results…4.1 Feed development: Quality and diversityChanges in botanical composition: • Mix of grasses and legume species. • The highly palatable forage species emerged
  21. 21. 4. Results… 4.2 Fattening uptake and income…LRSource: Household survey data (2009)Note: a Cash outlay is expenditure on purchased feed, drug, and veterinary services
  22. 22. 4. Results… 4.3 Gender and environmentGender Access to communal resources in forage production Use improved feeding (83% ) Breed selection adopted/adapted (68%) using age, body size and sex. Female farmers roughly doubled the sale of sheep (4.6 to 9.4 animals/year) About 90% of the beneficiary women controlled the income
  23. 23. 4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Ground cover, compaction, more diversity
  24. 24. 4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Flowers for bees
  25. 25. 4.3 Gender and environment…Environment: Gully stabilization, surface/groundwaterdevelopment
  26. 26. 5. Impact across IPMS PLWs5.1 Fattening uptake and income: LR
  27. 27. 5. Impact across IPMS PLWs… 5.1 Fattened oxen 50000 45000 Fattened oxen/yr 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Years
  28. 28. 5. Impact…5.1 Fattening income…LR 30000000 25000000 Total revenue/yr 20000000 15000000 10000000 50000000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year
  29. 29. 5. Impact… 5.1 Fattening beneficiaries…LR 25000 22500Beneficiary HHs/yr 20000 17500 15000 12500 10000 7500 5000 2500 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year
  30. 30. 5. Impact… 5.2 Fattening uptake and income: SR
  31. 31. 5. Impact…5.2 Fattened shoats 350000 300000 Fattened shoat/yr 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year
  32. 32. 5. Impact… 5.2 Fattening income of shoats 12000000 10000000 Total revenue/yr 80000000 60000000 40000000 20000000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year
  33. 33. 4. Impacts…5.2 Fattening beneficiaries of shoats Beneficiary HHs/yr 60000 50000 40000 30000 20000 10000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year
  34. 34. 6. Lessons and challenges Breed improvement system  Choice of breeds (local, exotic, cross breed)  Breeding system – natural, artificial  Approaches to improve natural and artificial insemination Reduction in mortality through phasing of pregnancy Focus on larger scale commercialized fatteners with credit and insurance Reduction in diseases through thermo stable vaccines Linking with export market demand
  35. 35. 6. Lessons and challenges… Knowledge Health managementBreed Livestock Capacity development Fattening system Commodity development Feed Research (scaling out/up)
  36. 36. Thank you!

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