Feeding the world: Smallholders and livestock

1,160 views
960 views

Published on

Presented by Iain Wright at the Workshop on Innovation Laboratory on Livestock and Climate Change, World Bank, Washington, 29 May 2014


Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,160
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
47
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
59
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Feeding the world: Smallholders and livestock

  1. 1. Feeding the World: Smallholders and Livestock Iain Wright Innovation Laboratory on Livestock and Climate Change World Bank, Washington, 29 May 2014
  2. 2. OUTLINE The global challenge for agriculture Livestock dimensions Role of smallholders Livestock challenges and opportunities A bit about ILRI
  3. 3. THE GLOBAL CHALLENGE How the world would feed itself sustainably by the time population stabilizes?  60% more food than is produced now  75% of this must come from productivity increase  While also reducing poverty  Taking care of natural resources  Coping with climate change
  4. 4. The global livestock sector  Total animals: 17 billion  Asset value: $1.4 trillion  Employs: 1.3 billion people  Uses: 1/3 of the earth’s ice-free surface 4
  5. 5. Four of the five highest value global agricultural commodities are livestock products 5 Source: FAOSTAT, 2010 data
  6. 6. Four out of the ten highest value African commodities are livestock 6 Source: FAOSTAT, 2010 data
  7. 7. Livestock contribution to GDP •Livestock accounts for 35-40% of Ag GDP in developing countries •Attracts 5-10% of investment •Growing at 2.5- 6.0%
  8. 8. 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 Milliontons Developing Developed Where is the growth? Gains in meat consumption in developing countries is outpacing that of developed countries and this is expected to continue
  9. 9. Growing Incomes are a key catalyst to demand growth for livestock products 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 Percapitameatconsumpion(kg/year) Per capita GDP (US$ PPP) US Japan Chi Ind Bra
  10. 10. Percentage increase in demand for livestock products 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Developing Countries Developed Countries Meat Milk Eggs 2000 to 2040 IFPRI-ILRI IMPACT model results Far higher growth in demand will occur in developing countries
  11. 11. 0 5 10 15 20 90 95 2000 2004 2005 2008 2009 Milliontonnes Beef Pork PoultryMeat Ovine Trade matters - but local markets matter more The value of meat trade is estimated over $100 billion in 2011, approximately 10 percent of agricultural trade. However, trade of meat accounts for only 10 percent of consumption
  12. 12. Food production: From where? Herrero et al. 2009
  13. 13. Livestock for livelihoods -developing world  70% of the world’s rural poor rely on livestock for important parts of their livelihoods.  Of the 1 billion poor livestock keepers in the world, around two-thirds are rural women.  More than half of livestock products are produced by small holders –and growing  Farm sizes will continue to decline in Africa  Up to 40% of benefits from livestock keeping come from non-market, intangible benefits, mostly insurance and financing.  Animal source foods are important for nutritional security
  14. 14. Livestock keepers in developing countries Density of poor livestock keepers One billion people earning <$2 a day depend on livestock 600 million in south Asia 300 million in sub Saharan Africa ILRI, 2012 0 or no data
  15. 15. Livestock opportunities and challenges  Feeding the World • Livestock provide 58 million tonnes of protein annually and 17% of the global kilocalories.  Removing poverty • Almost 1 billion people rely on livestock for livelihoods  Managing the environment • Livestock contribute 14 -18% anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions; use 30% of the freshwater used for agriculture and 30% of the ice free land  Improving human health • Zoonoses and contaminated animal source foods • Malnutrition and obesity Livestock non-tradables make large contributions to the rural poor • Manure, Energy (traction, fuel), cultural 15
  16. 16. To eat meat or not to eat . . . One billion hungry Two billion overweight
  17. 17. Source: (Steinfeld et al. 2006) Large productivity gaps between rich and poor countries are not closing Some developing country regions have gaps of up to 430% in milk 411 1021 517 4226 397 1380 904 6350 Africa Latin America South Asia Industrialized Countries Milk (kg/cow/yr) 1980 2005
  18. 18. Addressing GHG inefficiencies in the developing world is an opportunity Herrero et al PNAS GHG per kg of animal protein produced
  19. 19. 19 Increasing productivity reduces GHC emissions
  20. 20. Growth scenarios for livestock systems  ‘Strong growth’ – Where good market access and increasing productivity provide opportunities for continued smallholder participation.  ‘Fragile growth’ – Where remoteness, marginal land resources or agro-climatic vulnerability restrict intensification.  ‘High growth with externalities’ – Fast changing livestock systems potentially damaging the environment and human health  Different research and development challenges for poverty, food security, health and nutrition, environment
  21. 21. ILRI and CGIAR research programs Dryland Cereals Grain Legumes Livestock and Fish Maize Rice Roots, Tubers and Bananas Wheat Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Forests, Trees and Agroforestry Water, Land and Ecosystems Integrated Systems for the Humid Tropics Aquatic Agricultural Systems Dryland Systems Policies, Institutions, and Markets Agriculture for Nutrition and Health
  22. 22. ILRI Resources • Staff: 700. • Budget: $83 million. • 30+ scientific disciplines. • 140 senior scientists from 39 countries. • 56% of internationally recruited staff are from 22 developing countries. • 34% of internationally recruited staff are women. • Large campuses in Kenya and Ethiopia. • 70% of research in sub-Saharan Africa.
  23. 23. ILRI’s research teams 23 Integrated sciences Biosciences Animal science for sustainable productivity BecA-ILRI hub Food safety and zoonoses Vaccine platform Livestock systems and the environment Animal bioscience Livelihoods, gender and impact Feed and forage bioscience Policy, trade, value chains Bioscience facilities
  24. 24. The presentation has a Creative Commons licence. You are free to re-use or distribute this work, provided credit is given to ILRI. better lives through livestock ilri.org

×