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Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia
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Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs): Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia

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Presented by Elizabeth M. Waithanji at the Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013 …

Presented by Elizabeth M. Waithanji at the Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013


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  • 1. Gender Transformative Approaches (GTAs) Best practices for asset interventions in agriculture projects in Africa and Asia Elizabeth M. Waithanji Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013
  • 2. Presentation Outline • The GAAP project impact pathway • Types of interventions • Asset categories for each project • Adjustments – Gender transformative? • Impacts post adjustments • Conclusions and recommendations 2
  • 3. GAAP Impact Pathway Capacity building Outputs GTAs 3
  • 4. Types of interventions: Different Asset Enhancement Interventions Assets: Natural, Human, Physical, Social, Financial and Political Intervention Country Projects: • Bangladesh – capacity building in form of free training of dairy farmers groups in livestock production and health, as well as linking groups to markets by providing bulking and chilling facilities, hence, natural, human, financial and social assets enhanced • Kenya and Tanzania – money maker pumps bought by farmers, hence, physical and financial capital enhanced • Mozambique – free high yielding cows distributed and receiving farmers trained on production and health, hence, natural, financial and human assets enhanced 4
  • 5. Adjustments to Enhance Best Practices: Gender Transformative Approaches (GTA)? • Mozambique – early in the project – Trained a second household member – did not specify gender but often it was wife of HH head • Bangladesh – mid course adjustment – Men encouraged to accompany their wives to attend sick animals so that women could use skills as community animal health workers • Kenya – late in the project – Pump layaway program whereby women groups were encouraged to pay instalments for pumps which were given to them using the merry-go-round model 5
  • 6. Impacts – Positive Across All Sites • Increased household – production – Income and – assets (including pump ownership by women) • Improved wellbeing in terms of access to – – – – More nutrients Better hygiene (Bangladesh and Mozambique) Education Healthcare • Enhanced self esteem for women and men – Role models – Knowledgeable (especially women on dairy hygiene and animal health) – Leaders and providers 6
  • 7. Impacts - Negative • Women’s work load increased disproportionately to the increase men’s workload – Mozambique, men paid additional labourers to do the extra work and women delegated house and other work to children and existing servants • Culture of women seclusion emphasized – Bangladesh – Seclusion emphasized (women stayed at home and did the work whereas men delivered the milk to the collection points in the market; men accompanied women animal health workers as they visited cows to treat them) • Women’s and men’s crops redefined – Kenya and Tanzania – men owned one off harvest and sale crops like green maize, cabbage and tomatoes, whereas women became owners of repeated harvest green leafy vegetables such as kale, amaranth, and spinach • Women’s control of income and assets affected negatively – Bangladesh, women’s control declined, joint control increased – Kenya, women (from MHH) could not openly claim pump ownership 7
  • 8. KickStart PID – Kenya Men We cannot say that we own the pumps even if we do… we’ll be in big trouble. Once, my wife talked about owning bananas on my land… I chopped them down to show her who is in charge here. If he sells something that I bought and I did not want to be sold, I can report him to the chief and have it confiscated and returned to me. 8
  • 9. KickStart PID – Tanzania Women There is hardly time to groom ourselves … we no longer iron our clothes. In case of a divorce, he would have to go… I cannot leave my marital home. It is my right to stay! 9
  • 10. Conclusion and Recommendations for GTA • A woman buying an asset, having it registered in her name and, hence, owning it does not signify control of use of the asset or income/benefit accrued through it – E.g. women from MHH owning pumps (Kenya) or women animal health workers (Bangladesh) • What needs to be transformed is the actual access to, and control of, benefits accruing from the asset – At least some access and control of milk income by women from Mozambique and Bangladesh and crop income for women from Tanzania and Kenya • Women knowing their rights and having them protected by the law, protects them from dispossession of assets – e.g. Women in Kenya and Tanzania 10
  • 11. Acknowledgements: GAAP Partner Organizations

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