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Gender mainstreaming at ATA: Current and future directions

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Presented by Zemzem Muhammed, EATA at the Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013

Presented by Zemzem Muhammed, EATA at the Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013


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  • Women represent approximately 50% of rural populationWomen account 70% of household food productionWomen contribute 48% of agriculture labor force Despite the significant contribution of women in agriculture the gender inequality situation in the sectors is seriousThe inequality is reflected in various ways: - Limited access to extension services, Less representation in agricultural institutions like coops, and Receive less acknowledgement and privilege
  • Women farmers generally face more barriers than men in operating effectively in factor markets. As a result, they incur higher effective costs for information, technology, inputs, and credit and their productivity is lowered.Women also lack incentives to increase productivity: food crop prices are low, their access to markets is poor, and husbands often control the income from the products of women’s labor.
  • While reducing the large gender gaps in Ethiopia is an important development goal in its own right, it is well established that improving gender equality in the country would lead to large leaps in achieving many of the other key development goals. World Bank (2008) estimates indicate that reducing basic gender inequalities in education and the labor market could increase the annual GDP growth in Ethiopia by around 1.9 percentage points – which would be an important contribution to poverty reduction given the elasticity of growth to poverty reduction.
  • The focus of the program was ensuring the inclusion of gender in sector strategies like Teff and chick-pea, maize and other agri systems like extension, coopsThe first

Gender mainstreaming at ATA: Current and future directions Gender mainstreaming at ATA: Current and future directions Presentation Transcript

  • Gender mainstreaming at ATA: Current and future directions Zemzem Muhammed Livestock and Fish Gender Working Group Workshop and Planning Meeting Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14-18 October 2013
  • Agenda 1. Mandates of ATA 2. Gender equality in ATA 3. Deliverable 2013 ₋ Joint needs assessment of AGP regions ₋ Key findings ₋ Specific deliverables ₋ Status 4. Gender in Value Chain ₋ Current practices ₋ Challenges ₋ Learning 5. Future Direction 6. Conclusion 1
  • The creation of the ATA is the result of a process that lasted nearly two years Late Prime Minster Meles meets with Melinda Gates and requests a review of Ethiopia’s agricultural extension systems by the Gates Foundation Jan ‘09 Seven Diagnostic reports and an integrated report on a mechanism to implement the recommendations submitted to Prime Minister Sep ‘09 Recommendations of extension diagnostic endorsed by PM. PM requests support for additional diagnostics in seeds, soils, irrigation, agricultu ral finance, and key value chains Aug ‘10 Council of Ministers pass federal regulation establishing Agricultural Transformation Agency Oct ‘10 Government decision to create an independent organization modeled after Taiwan and Korean “acceleration units” as recommended by the Gates Foundation reports Dec ‘10 Aug ‘11 First Agricultural Transformation Council (Board) meeting chaired by the Prime Minister held, inaugurating ATA’s program operations 2
  • The process that led to the creation of the ATA identified some key issues that needed to be addressed for Ethiopia to reach its agricultural development targets • • • • • • • Current situation: Agriculture accounts for over 40% of national GDP the largest portion of the economy Smallholder farmers account for over 90% of agriculture production Rapid growth in the agriculture sector over the past 10 years has contributed to a reduction of poverty, from nearly 40% of population to less than 30% However, gains are uneven Ethiopia’s productivity levels continue to be among the lowest in Africa Many smallholder farmers continue to produce for subsistence Increasing concerns about smallholder farmers ability to mitigate the risks related to climate change Two high level bottlenecks were identified as key challenges in reaching the vision • Lack of capacity to identify • • tailor-made solutions for the key systemic bottlenecks in the agriculture sector • Lack of capacity to effectively coordinate and drive the implementation of a holistic set of interventions that will transform the system and bring impact at scale ATA was created to address these bottlenecks • • Ultimate Vision: Agriculture productivity levels for all key crops above the average of African countries and rivaling Asian levels Commercialization of most smallholder farmers in key crops and geographies through effective linkage to domestic and international demand sinks Increases in smallholder farmer productivity and incomes leads to reduction of national poverty level approaching or less than 10% of the population Agriculture-led industrialization leads to national middle income status by 2025 3
  • The ATA was created to address the bottlenecks identified in the Gates diagnostic through a clear mandate which it aims to achieve using a three-part strategy, which is executed by a strong organization, with clear targets and a robust performance management system that tracks progress We work towards our Mandate… …via a threepart Strategy... …which is underpinned by a high-performing Organization, clear Target Setting, and a robust Performance Management system The ATA is a time-bound government organization whose mandate is to: 1) Support our partners in developing and implementing solutions to systemic bottlenecks in order to transform the agriculture sector, coupled with; 2) Support the implementation of a targeted set of integrated interventions that will make immediate impact for a large number of smallholder farmers in Ethiopia What does the ATA actually do to achieve its mandate? The ATA works with its partners on four specific types of activities: • Problem Solving • Implementation Support • Capacity Building • Coordination How does the ATA Where does work relative to the ATA work? others? The ATA’s engagements All of the ATA’s work takes take place across a place through constructive targeted set of issues partnerships with others: and geographies: • Transformation Council • Value chains • Ministry of Agriculture • Systems • Regional Bureaus of Ag. • Crosscutting issues • Development partners • Special projects • Private Sector • Clusters • NGOs With prioritized levels • Others of support ATA aims to put together a high-performing organization with a clear structure, expert staff, strong systems and processes, as well as a well-defined set of shared values to drive the agricultural transformation process ATA works with all partners to develop clear targets for interventions that will lead to agricultural transformation ATA is developing a robust performance management system for its internal operations and is working with the Ministry of Agriculture and other partners to strengthen the performance management system of the sector 4
  • Strategy Pillar I – The ATA uses four different tools to achieve its mandate How:  Rigorous data-driven and objective analysis to determine root causes of issues; examination of international and domestic best practices; and granular refinement of solutions to ensure adaptation of solutions to specific agroecologies and Ethiopia’s unique context When: 1. During the analytical period in Stage 1 of a program 2. During the implementation of an intervention How: When:  Capacity building by partnership as 1. During the analytics and problem ATA staff work closely with partners on solving phases in both Stage 1 & 2 deliverable execution 2. During the implementation of an  Availing specific tools and expertise to intervention in both Stage 1 & 2 implementing partners  Fellowship program and secondments (in future) Capacity Building Problem Solving Implementation Support Stakeholder Coordination How:  Workshops, working groups, and frequent engagement with partners during strategy development  Implementation platforms and steering committees When: 1. During the analytics and problem solving phases in both Stage 1 & 2 2. During the implementation of an intervention in both Stage 1 & 2 How:  Through predefined levels of support based on the prioritization of a deliverable on the national transformation agenda When: 1. During initial interventions undertaken during Stage 1 of a program 2. During implementation of interventions during Stage 2 of a program 5
  • Strategy Pillar II – Although the ATA is a national organization working across the entire agriculture sector, in 2013 it will focus on certain target value chains, geographies, and program areas Value Chains  Integrated activites in 2013  Tef  Wheat  Maize   High priority in 2013:  160 Tef woredas  47 Maize woredas  41 Wheat woredas  Targeted activities in 2013  Sesame  Barley  Rotation crops  Geographies Secondary priority in 2013:  12 Sesame woredas  58 coffee woredas Late 2013 and 2014  Coffee  Livestock Systems        Seed Soil Cooperatives Input & Output Markets Research & Extension Markets Household Irrigation Crosscutting Issues Special Projects      Public Private Partnerships  Under review  Strategic Grain Reserve  Agro-processing  Home-grown school feeding  Gender Mainstreaming Climate Change & Environment Technology Access & Adoption Information & Communication Technology Integration Monitoring, Learning & Evaluation 66
  • Gender in Agricultural Transformation Agency  Gender equality in ATA is part of the special initiative program  Gender is a cross-cutting issue which needs to be integrated in all organizational policies, strategies, programs, systems and accountability structures  The gender program in ATA employs two major approaches with particular emphasis on mainstreaming of gender in the value chains to make sure that women farmers are proactively engaged and benefited from programs, enhancing the sensitivity of various systems to facilitate participation and benefit of women and consideration of gender dimension employed to address gender issues  The second approach is supporting the implementation of specific or standalone projects which specifically address and empower rural women. 7
  • Rational for addressing Gender in ATA  ATA acknowledges the existence of social inequalities within rural Ethiopian communities due to biological differences (e.g. sex ) and socio-economic status; this determines access to opportunities, services and resources.  As a transformation agency, ATA believes that achieving sustainable development is impossible without addressing the inequalities which hinder people from accessing opportunities and utilizing their potential to change their own situation.  Gender based inequality cuts across all inequalities, deepens the disadvantages of individuals and communities, and reinforces poverty.  ATA works to provide Ethiopia’s smallholder farmers with access to new and improved technologies and techniques, proven economic mechanisms, and strengthened infrastructure and systems. The aim of all ATA efforts is to help increase farmer productivity and improve livelihoods. Women represent half of smallholder farmers and therefore constitutes the key target population of ATA’s engagements. 8
  • Why do we need to focus on gender equality? Justice and human rights • Women represent half the world population yet their participation in different arenas is limited and their current profile is very low in many respects as compared to their male counter parts Cross-cutting nature of gender inequality • Gender cuts across every inequality issue and affect groups who are disadvantaged; it also deepens their level of disadvantage Development concern • Human centered development thinking acknowledges the potential of both men and women for development and by the same logic development needs to enhance the wellbeing of both • Efficiency and Effectiveness – due to limited education, training and exposure opportunity of women and girls and also lack of technologies or facilities which can fit their needs, their level of contribution in terms of quality and higher result is restrained • Sustainability – ideas and better practices sustain when they get buy-in by all people but many development programs lose sight of women and girls • Chain Reaction – studies show that women’s education and economic empowerment results in the improvement of the child upbringing, nutrition, family health which in turn will bring over all development Accountability • The development of the concept of accountability which includes downward/forward accountability. For all development investments to be accountable, they need to be accountable to both men and women 9
  • Women farmers’ needs are not understood and addressed in the agriculture sector. In Ethiopia, women account for 60-80% of food production, thus agricultural output could potentially be increased by 15-40% just by providing women with assets equal to those of men. Women farmers’ productivity remains low relative to their potential. They lack access to credit, extension, inputs, and markets and their domestic roles limit their available time. Investing in rural women has the potential to accelerate growth as they represent a significant share of the workforce, manage resources carefully, and invest in children. Source: USAID Feed the Future (FTF) FY 2010 Implementation Plan - Ethiopia 10
  • Addressing the massive gender gaps in Ethiopia is a priority for agricultural transformation because of the benefits to smallholder farmer productivity and profitability. At the national level, reducing gender inequalities increases annual GDP growth In Ethiopia, the agriculture sector accounts for approximately 50% of GDP with 6% average annual growth. Economist at the World Bank have estimated that in Ethiopia, the annual GDP growth could increase by around 1.9 percentage points* by reducing basic gender inequalities in education and the labor market. Currently, Ethiopia ranks at the bottom of the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Index at 118 of 135 overall. Factors include economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, health and survival, and political empowerment. At a farmer level, there are significant productivity returns to increasing the human and physical capital of women farmers When women farmers have the following: The age, education, and input levels of men farmers Yields increases by: 22% The same land area as men farmers 10.5% The fertilizer level used by men farmers 1.6% *The calculated annual GDP growth was derived from macroeconomic analysis conducted in 2008 by World Bank Senior Economists including Markus Goldstein. Source: Development Economics LDB Database; World Bank Ethiopia CPS, 2012; World Bank Toolkit for Gender and Agriculture 11
  • The Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) sets clear objectives and targets to ensure that women, men and youth farmers participate and benefit in the agricultural sector. • • 10% In order to realize this pillar objective and strategy, the main approaches are: – strengthening women’s institutions, – implementing specific packages, and – ensuring participation and benefit of women. • 30% The National Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) has identified promoting gender and youth empowerment and equity as one of the seven key strategies identified to achieve sustainable rapid and broad-based growth path (GTP main document page 22). In addition, targeting 30% female headed households and 10% youth under 30 in any extension service is clearly highlighted and any actor involved in the extension service provision is expected to consider this national direction. 12
  • The primary approach to address gender issues in value chain programs is though gender mainstreaming. What is gender mainstreaming? • The process of assessing the implications of any planned action on women and men including legislation, policies or programs, in any area and at all levels. • It is a strategy for making the concerns and experiences of women as well as of men an integral part of the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies and programs in political, economic and societal spheres, so that women and men benefit equally, and inequality is not perpetuated. • The ultimate goal of mainstreaming is to achieve gender equality (ECOSOC, 1997). 13
  • The overall objective of gender mainstreaming at the organizational level is to ensure that programs, organizational practices, leadership and partnerships promote gender equality. Programs: Ensure women and youth are purposely targeted in the programs supported by ATA Organizational practices: Create an organization that proactively promotes gender equality Leadership: Enhance leadership commitment Partnerships: Advance the gender equality objective in ATA’s partnership procedure and relation • Understand the existing situation of men, women, and youth and their participation, capacity, challenges and opportunities in the specific program context • Set appropriate targeting of married women, female headed households and young women and men • Identify and address common and specific needs which enhance participation and benefit • Enhance staff knowledge and provide guidelines and checklists • Promote gender equality through the human resource management policy and practice • Create an organizational culture to uphold the equality principle; actively communicate • Create strong accountability mechanisms to ensure that staff are hold responsible for gender mainstreaming results • Develop an MLE system with the inclusion of gender in the results framework, planning and reporting formats, project appraisal checklists and log-frames, assessments, etc. • Communicate the leadership commitment on gender mainstreaming to the staff • Putt in place strong linkage and accountability mechanism to gender equality commitments • Exhibit consistency in providing guidance and enforcing the policy objective • Ensure that commitment on gender mainstreaming is incorporated in partnership selection criteria • Adequately incorporate role of partners in addressing the issue of gender in MOU and ensure the necessary resource is allocated • Capacitate partners to adequately address gender issues • Facilitate learning session among partners and other stakeholders 14
  • The Gender Program Team at ATA ensures that women, men and youth farmers participate and benefit from agricultural transformation through increased productivity and income. Women, men and youth smallholder farmers sustainably increase their productivity and profitability through overcoming gender constraints. Vision Mission Approach Address systemic level bottlenecks in the agriculture sector through problem solving, implementation support, capacity building and stakeholder coordination on gender issues. Ensure ATA’s programs address the needs of women, men and youth smallholder farmers through gender mainstreaming, integration and specific interventions. Ethiopian Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) 30% 10% Requires targeting 30% female headed households and 10% youth under age 30 for agricultural extension services. 15
  • Gender inequality is reinforced Societal role allocation among men and women and the value attached to each role Patriarchal system perpetuated Malignant difference in status; they have no vision other than the one set by the society Determines level of access and control over resources, services and decisions Limited opportunity for personal development and unable to understand and challenge inequalities 16
  • Capacity Needs Assessment Findings Strength Weakness/Area of improvement        Gender equality and participation of women farmers part of the five year plan Staff assigned in RBOA and FCA( except in Amhara) and member of management in Oromiya and SNNP Linkage between the gender unit and others Reporting formats capture sex disaggregated data Linkage/collaboration with BOWCA    Gaps in Woreda level structures No comprehensive analysis done to inform planning and track progresses No regionally customized gender audit Poor documentation practice Weak coordination among different stakeholders Opportunity Threat       Gender being part of the GTP and other national level frameworks BOWCYA and WA part of regional command post The availability of NGOs and other actors working in the area The land use and certification program Development groups and networks  The entrenched patriarchal system and associated resistance Resource 17 17
  • Gender issues across the components of the value chain Technology Research & Promotion Input Supply Input Distribution & Access On-farm Production Access to Post-harvest Technology Market Linkages ▪ Research ▪ Identifying the ▪ Women farmers ▪ Extension ▪ Both women and ▪ Access market agendas incorporate both women and men concerns ▪ Technology development consider accessibility and applicability for both women and men ▪ Developing and disseminating need based technology which considers the labor issue kind of input they need, capacities, constraints & opportunities to access & addressing constraints ▪ Agricultural inputs/seed, fertilizer, mechanization technology become available to both women and men access to various inputs is facilitated through addressing hindrances lack of awareness, cred it, etc. ▪ Assess and ensure appropriate utilization of input by both women and men men have access to knowledge and technologies for processing and storage which reduces losses ▪ Women farmers capacity to use post harvest technologies, val ue addition and storage ▪ Identify opportunities for value addition and facilitate support Source: Gender Program Team Analysis services target women farmers to ensure that they gain knowledge and implement appropriate agronomic practices ▪ Increase participation of women farmers by identifying appropriate time and place for training for better return through assessing and addressing gender related constraints ▪ Enabling women to participate in farmer institutions, hav e access to market information and facilitate linkage Demand Sinks Development ▪ Investigation of access to input and output markets by both women and men 18
  • The objective of gender mainstreaming in value chain programs is to ensure the participation and benefit of women, men and youth farmers.  The gender mainstreaming effort in the value chain ensures that women farmers are purposely targeted across all components of the value chain through identifying and addressing constraints which hamper their participation and benefit. Targeting  Women farmers particularly female-headed households are targeted in the onfarm demonstrations and through all components of the value chain programs.  Women farmers in male-headed households will also be targeted in the value chain programs depending on the level of their involvement in the different components of the value chain. 19
  • Background information on the situation of women farmers in the value chain programs n TrformationPlan (GTP)  Women farmers, in both female-headed households and male-headed households, participate in various value chains but their benefits are not proportional to their contributions. This is due to different gender-based constraints and a lack of proactive engagement to address these constraints in various components of the value chains.  There is a tendency to limit women farmers’ involvement to specific value chains like vegetable and poultry; there is a lack of acknowledgment women farmers’ contributions in the primary agricultural crops (i.e. wheat, maize, tef.)  The key gender issues across the value chain programs are summarized in the following diagram. 20
  • Specific actions identified for the ATA Wheat Initiative Target women farmers for the on-farm demonstration( Bench mark farmers) / 30% GTP targeting Target women in male headed households for agronomic practice training and awareness raising trainings Prepare communications materials that are appropriate for low literacy levels and determine the delivery method in terms of selecting the venue, time and setting given the triple roles of women and their safety concerns Make mechanical technologies accessible and applicable to women farmers Include gender units in the RBOA as part of the regional working group Conduct a gender analysis in a sample of potential areas to identify the key challenges that prevent female headed households from participating in the on-farm demonstrations Source: Gender Program Team Analysis 21
  • Challenges and learning from the current practice  The engagement of the GPT focuses on the following points: - Ensuring the inclusion of the gender component in sector strategies , program plans and proposals developed for fund raising - Session on gender included in DA and SMS trainings and stakeholder workshops(to a limited extent) - Ensuring the selection of bench mark farmers includes female farmers(Eg in Wheat initiative)  As a result the touch point at ground level was not that strong and not able to influence the implementation as expected  Learning: there should be a mechanism to influence the implementation at ground level and tracking mechanism for timely action. 22 22
  • Future Direction of addressing gender in value chain will employ two approaches Objective: Ensure the increment of Women’s productivity & target areas by 20% by enhancing competitiveness of the VC through addressing gender inequality and tap in to the potential of female farmers Approach: Mainstreaming and standalone approach employed. Mainstreaming: the first includes ensuring proactive targeting female farmers across the VC component like their male counter parts. Standalone: which includes special targeting of female farmers for information dissemination, service provision through engaging WDG and networks 23 23
  • Key actions to ensure the mainstreaming of gender in value chain programs Input Availabili ty Input distribut ion Input financin g Agrono my Mechani zation Post harvest and marketin g MLE • Seed production and availability considers women farmers preferences • Women farmers targeted to actively participate and benefit from community based seed multiplication • Women farmers are informed about QPM and small packaging of seed(Teff) through targeting women development groups and networks • Sensitizing unions and primary coops to target female farmers • Target women-only and gender balanced primary cooperatives for input distribution and capacity building to emphasize access to inputs for women • Female farmers, women development groups and networks targeted for information dissemination to participate in direct marketing, blended fertilizer, chemical and pesticide application • Targeting women development groups and networks for information dissemination • Assess the friendliness of the system to women and further inform the credit model • Documenting best practices of women who have successfully utilized credits and repay their loan • IEC materials will have section on gender which clearly shows the benefit of addressing women farmers and how to reach women farmers • Training to target female DAs and SMS and a session on gender and how to address gender issues in the DAs and SMS provision of support to female farmers • Female headed households included in the farmer based demonstration • Female farmers play a role in field days and are involved as information providers(educators); support the establishment of targeted female listeners groups for the Farm Radio • Targeted to reach women farmers through women groups and networks • The row planter production needs to consider accessibility to women farmers in terms labor demand, technicality, price( credit opportunity) • Support women groups to provide mechanical technology(row planter, harvester, thresher) renting service to women farmers • Ensure women, men and youth farmers are informed about the service; Target women through targeting women development groups and networks • Information sharing to women farmers about market information particularly selling opportunities • Women identified and involved in commission based private workers- traders (aggregating production to coops on commission basis) • Monitor, document practices for further learning and sharing. Source: Gender Program Team Analysis 24
  • Key Activities and next steps 1. Selecting pilot woredas for each VC: Conduct rapid appraisal and understand gender issues across the VC component; Design special support mechanism; sensitization workshop and training to DAs, SMS, WA,WCYA, Women development groups and networks: Female farmer radio listeners groups 2. Coordination among stakeholders: MOA-WAD, RBOA Gender units, FCA gender units , Was, WCYA, Gender units in financial institutions and follow-up 3. Documentation of updates and learning for further planning and scale-up 25 25
  • Stakeholder Coordination  MOA/RBOA gender unit: playing a leadership role in identifying targeting ( woredas, women’s groups and women farmers, coordinating and follow-up the activity implementation, coordination among stakeholders  FCA/RCPA gender unit: sensitizing unions and coops to target and involve women input distribution and out-put marketing: - Manual development, provision of training and followup  Micro-finance institutions gender units: enhance the friendliness and accessibility of input credit through disseminating information to women farmers, assess and enhance friendliness of the credit services  Women’s Association and Women, children and Youth Affair: Facilitate and mobilize women to participate in information sharing efforts, services access, assessment and documentation of practices.  ATA: supporting MOA/RBOA in coordination, providing technical support in bringing different experiences, development of manuals and facilitation of trainings and workshops, follow-up and coordination efforts and financing the initiative. 26 26
  • 2014 Tef Initiative identified 6 intervention areas with 2 target levels 1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Input access and availability (seeds, fertilizer and chemicals ) Improve and monitor the quality and quantity of appropriate varieties produced by formal sector for target woredas Ensure AISE orders the right amount and type with focus on UREA and blended on time Expand community based seed multiplication in target woredas Soil testing to develop targeted fertilizer recommendation Expand 5kg packaging of tef seed by formal sector 6 Post harvest and marketing 1. Expand warehouse network 2. Identify and create links to domestic commercial consumers Tef Initiative 2014 - All initiative woredas - High producing 46 woredas 5 Agronomy 1. Develop and distributed manuals, pamphlets, to SMS, DAs, and farmers, and expand FRI 2. Conduct TOT for regional, zonal and woreda SMS at right time 3. Expand farmer based demonstration sites 4. Develop crop mix strategy 5. Expand conservation agriculture and rain gauges and soil moisture tester use 6. Scale up tef-chickpea double cropping (TBD) 2 4 1. 2. 3. 4. Input distribution (seed, Fertilizers and chemicals) Strengthen the planning and logistics for the traditional distribution system for seeds and fertilizer Capacity building for primary coop amd FCU ICT tracking of seed and fertilizer distribution Expand promotion of blended fertilizer Source: Tef team discussions, July – Aug 2013 1. 3 Input finance and insurance 1. Ensure sufficient liquidity is available for input financing for all target woredas (30% of farmers) 2. Avail access to input financing to all target woredas using new and refined credit model 3. Develop risk insurance 4. Implementation of voucher credit system by MFIs and Coops` 2. 3. 4. Mechanization Disseminate knowledge about and promote use of thresher in 2013/14 Develop new row planter, refine the existing planters Expand availability of row planters, harvester and threshers Conduct training on how to manage tools 27
  • Gender components for 2014 Tef Initiative - All initiative woredas - High producing 46 woredas 1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 2 1. 2. 3. 4. 3 1. 2. 3. 4. Input access and availability (seeds, fertilizer and chemicals ) Improve and monitor the quality and quantity of appropriate varieties produced by formal sector for target woredas Ensure AISE orders the right amount and type with focus on UREA and blended on time Expand community based seed multiplication in target woredas Soil testing to develop targeted fertilizer recommendation Expand 5kg packaging of tef seed by formal sector Input distribution (Seed, fertilizers and chemicals) Strengthen the planning and logistics for the traditional distribution system for seeds and fertilizer Capacity building for primary coop and FCU ICT tracking of seed and fertilizer distribution Expand promotion of blended fertilizer Input finance and insurance Ensure sufficient liquidity is available for input financing for all target woredas (30% of farmers) Avail access to input financing to all target woredas using new and refined credit model Develop risk insurance Implementation of voucher credit system by MFIs and Coops` Source: Tef team discussions, July – Aug 2013 Specific activities Targeting • Engage women and youth in • ## women, men and community based seed multiplication • [smaller packaging may promote • adoption of improved seed by low income households; especially female-headed households] • Provide gender training for union and • • • cooperative leadership Engage women-only coops Use ICT tracking with sex- and agedisaggregated data Conduct demonstration of blended fertilizer with female-headed households • Ensure the commitment of MFIs to promote input financing options (including vouchers) to achieve more than 50% women clients of all types (female households heads, married women and youth); leverage existing rural women’s networks youth participating and benefiting from community based seed multiplication ## women, men and youth farmers that purchase 5kg package • ## women-only coop • • • and coops with >30% women membership ## women, men and youth farmers that purchase inputs ## FHH conducting blended fertilizer demonstration ## women, men and youth clients based on loan size, type (i.e. voucher) and use 28
  • Gender components for 2014 Tef Initiative - All initiative woredas - High producing 46 woredas 4 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Mechanization Disseminate knowledge about and promote use of thresher in 2013/14 Develop new row planter, refine the existing planters Expand availability of row planters, harvester and threshers Conduct training on how to manage tools Agronomy Develop and distributed manuals, pamphlets, to SMS, DAs, and farmers, and expand FRI Conduct TOT for regional, zonal and woreda SMS at right time Expand farmer based demonstration sites Develop crop mix strategy Expand conservation agriculture and rain gauges and soil moisture tester use Scale up tef-chickpea double cropping (TBD) Specific activities Targeting • Provide women-only trainings for how • ## women using row to manage tools • Provide gender training as part of • • • • • 6 Post harvest and marketing 1. Expand warehouse network 2. Identify and create links to domestic commercial consumers Source: Tef team discussions, July – Aug 2013 regional agronomy TOT Develop women-friendly communication materials DAs conduct women-only trainings at convenient times and locations Increase the number of femaleheaded household demonstrations Invite women and youth to farmer field days and farmer exposure visits Organize women-only and mixed listening groups for Farm Radio [pending impact results] Train women on conservation ag. • • Ensure warehouse targets women • Promote purchasing from women farmers and cooperatives with >30% women membership planter, harvesters and threshers • ## extension members • trained ## materials reviewed • ## women trained at women-only sessions • ## FHH demonstrations • ## women and youth • • attending field days ## women in Farm Radio listening groups ## of women practicing conservation ag. • ## women using warehouses • ## purchased from women or coops with >30% women 29 membership
  • Informing programs with evidence  Gender analysis  Gender audit of RBOA 30 30
  • Innovations to help our country grow
  • Conclusion  Clear direction + alignment + commitment = Achieving gender equality objectives beyond the GTP targeting 32 32
  • Gender issues across the components of the value chain Input Supply  Seed production and availability considers women farmers preferences  Women farmers targeted to actively participate and benefit from community based seed multiplication  Women farmers are informed about QPM and small packaging of seed(Teff) through targeting women development groups and networks Source: Gender Program Team Analysis Input Distribution & Access Sensitizing unions and primary coops to target female farmers : Target womenonly and gender balanced primary cooperatives for input distribution and capacity building to emphasize access to inputs for women female farmers, women development groups and networks targeted On-farm Production Access to Post-harvest Technology Market Linkages ▪ Extension ▪ Both women and ▪ Access market services target women farmers to ensure that they gain knowledge and implement appropriate agronomic practices ▪ Increase participation of women farmers by identifying appropriate time and place for training men have access to knowledge and technologies for processing and storage which reduces losses ▪ Women farmers capacity to use post harvest technologies, val ue addition and storage ▪ Identify opportunities for value addition and facilitate support for better return through assessing and addressing gender related constraints ▪ Enabling women to participate in farmer institutions, have access to market information and facilitate linkage Demand Sinks Development ▪ Investigation of access to input and output markets by both women and men 33
  • Priorities for 2013 significantly shaped by the result of the capacity needs assessment Key deliverable Q1 milestone Q2 milestone Q3 milestone Q4 milestone 1 Gender mainstreamed in ATA programs ATA Value chain, systems and special initiatives identified specific gender issues Implementation framework developed and operationalized Implementation and follow-up of identified gender issues Follow-up implementation and document learning 2 Enhanced institutional mainstreaming through organizational development Gender mainstreaming guideline drafted and staff awareness enhanced Gender mainstreaming guideline finalized and implementation started; staff awareness enhanced Gender mainstreaming guideline implemented; staff awareness enhanced The gender mainstreaming guideline fully implemented by all team; staff awareness enhanced 3 Women's Economic Leadership (WEL) project implementation Pilot projects launched in Tigray and Oromia Women’s enterprises established with business plans in Tigray and Oromia Pilot projects launched in Amhara and SNNP Women’s enterprises established with business plans in Amhara and SNNP 4 Built the capacity of MOA-WAD and gender units in RBOA Women’s enterprises operationalized in Tigray and Oromia TOR developed for Gender analysis and gender audit Commission the gender analysis and audit task and data collection finalized Gender analysis and gender audit report Finalized Successful pilot projects in Tigray and Oromia Analysis report and audit finding shared and implementation started 34 34