Feed Investment Study: Summary
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Presented by Shirley Tarawali at the Workshop on Feed Technology Screening and Prioritisation, Dehra Dun, India, 19-22 September 2011

Presented by Shirley Tarawali at the Workshop on Feed Technology Screening and Prioritisation, Dehra Dun, India, 19-22 September 2011

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  • This study was commissioned by WB. It is actually one aspect of a two part piece of work, with the other aspect focusing on learning lessons from development projects about the importance and opportunities in relation to livestock market participation. This study focused on identifying opportunities for investment related to feeds that would enhance livelihoods of smallholder farmers. The key issue – development projects and investors who want to ensure that smallholder livestock producers are able to participate in and benefit from markets need to address the feed dimension of animal productivity in ways that ensure appropriate, environmentally sustainable and affordable feed options are accessible for smallholder livestock producers.
  • Clearly this is a vast, complex and dynamic issue – but for the purposes of developing some systematic way of identifying and prioritising opportunities requires some simplification. Aware of the limitations of such!Considering feed in relation to livestock commodity value chain requires a different approach to the feed –focused supply driven one of the pastProductivity – key to market engagement.Environment – includes trade offs in biomass use, land and water use, impacts on GHGsEquity – issues of rich vs poor; gender; land-no landEconomics – cost of production/feed (70%); labour; costs versus product value; access to fair and viable markets etc
  • Systematic but limitationsFramework to be applied for specific livestock commodity value chain – can be for a region, but also works for a community (and in between) – might need some tweaking!Allows to articulate issues related to all dimensions; to capture dynamics (eg we applied for 2010 and 2030....)These issues can be translated into dimensions that relate to:institutions and policies (including changing public and private sector roles); knowledge and innovation;as well as technologies themselves
  • Diagram to illustrate impacts of intensification With intensification:Least market oriented:All feeds sourced at household levelMost market oriented:Feed sourced off farmConsiderable impact of policies; public/private sector interactionsFeeds less variable/diverse
  • Diagram to illustrate impacts of intensification With intensification:Least market oriented:All feeds sourced at household levelMost market oriented:Feed sourced off farmConsiderable impact of policies; public/private sector interactionsFeeds less variable/diverse
  • Qualitative and quantitative assessments largely matchedOverall confirmation that all three dimensions intersect and need to be addressed

Feed Investment Study: Summary Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Feed Investment Study: Summary Shirley TarawaliWorkshop on Feed Technology Screening and Prioritisation, Dehra Dun, India, 19-22 September 2011 1
  • 2. Key issues Past feed research “supply focused” Feed in VC context – different approach: – Demand for livestock commodity • Feed as ONE technology element • Technology as ONE VC element Investments impacting on feed important: – Productivity – market engagement – Environment (trade-offs) – Equity – Economics (not just producers) Public and private sector dimensions – Private: producers, providers, individuals, corporate – Public: from research/extension ......to.....enabling environment; regulatory Complex – Simplify? – Systematic? 2
  • 3. Consider...Framework to classify feed dimensionsSome findingsBroader issues that may impact 3
  • 4. FrameworkFeed source Feed type Own farm Natural grazing Planted pastures Community Other planted forages Crop residues Market Crop by products Other by products Grains Policy Roots and tubers Mineral etc supplements Balanced concentrates Opportunities to increase feed: Produce more --- Utilize better --- Import 4
  • 5. This framework: Seems to work  Tweaking! Allows for technology  Consider different and non dimensions to “levels” be articulated  Limited prioritisation Considers dynamic  Limitations of “expert” Apply in context of consultation – non specific commodity VC quantitative Allowed some initial  Articulation of quantitative evaluation diversity? 5
  • 6. “intensification” Source of feed (%DM) Natural grazing Planted pastures Planted forages Crop residues Crop by-products Other by-products Grains Roots & tubers Mineral/vit suppl 2010 Balanced concentrates 2030 Own farm Community Market 6
  • 7. “intensification” Source of feed (%DM) Natural grazing Planted pastures Planted forages Crop residues Crop by-products Other by-products Grains Roots & tubers Mineral/vit suppl 2010 Balanced concentrates 2030 Own farm Community Market 7
  • 8. Produce more Utilize better Import Knowledge and Policies Technologies service provision 8
  • 9. Produce more Utilize better Import•Institutionalise multi •Knowledge services: •Improve marketing dimensional crop improvement •Sourcing, balancing, targeting •Provision of knowledge, market•Improve access to HY forages rations info, credit and crops •Processing of feeds •Incentives for small scale•Evaluate price-policy issues •Governance of feed quality; entrepreneurs•Improve water productivity water •Access to service delivery Knowledge and Policies Technologies service provision 9
  • 10. Produce more Utilize better Import Knowledge and Policies Technologies service provision• Infrastructure • Developing BDS: • Farm• Community • Knowledge management based NRM • Inputs • Crop husbandry• Support BDS • Credit • Food-feed crops• PP consortia for • Forages food-feed crops • Water• Governance of harvesting NR • Processing• (PES) • Feed storage • Balanced rations 10
  • 11. Policies Knowledge andTechnologies service provision 11
  • 12. In general..... Investment in infrastructure Combinations of public and private investments – Facilitation of adoption/mkt participation • Reduced transaction costs – improved access to services and information – smallholders and other market agents Technologies – Often private (individual) – Bundle with other technologies – Intersection of policies and institutions Increasing animal numbers – attractive for private investment BUT negative environment: – Private investment in better feeding plus incentives to reduce transaction costs (access to feeds, participation in product markets) BDS – multiple dimensions Innovation system approaches 12
  • 13. To consider.... Different levels.... From farm through community, local, national policies and institutions provide important context Seasonality? Are there some “must haves”? – Context – eg specific growing livestock commodity value chain – Information to guide options? • “Level” of intensification.... Dynamic? • Institutional “diagnosis” • Market engagement • .....etc Current and potential feed resources 13