Designing community-based breeding strategies for indigenous sheep breeds of smallholders in Ethiopia: The case of Bonga breeds

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Presented by Kifle Belachew at the ICARDA-ILRI-BOKU project workshop on Designing community-based breeding strategies for indigenous sheep breeds of smallholders in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, October 29, …

Presented by Kifle Belachew at the ICARDA-ILRI-BOKU project workshop on Designing community-based breeding strategies for indigenous sheep breeds of smallholders in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, October 29, 2010.

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  • 1. Designing Community-Based B reeding Strategies for Indigenous Sheep Breeds of Smallholders in Ethiopia The case of Bonga Breeds Presented by Kifle Belachew at the ICARDA-ILRI-BOKU project workshop on Designing community-based breeding strategies for indigenous sheep breeds of smallholders in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, October 29, 2010. (Bonga Research Center, SARI)
  • 2.
    • Presented by Kifle Belachew at the ICARDA-ILRI-BOKU project workshop on Designing community-based breeding strategies for indigenous sheep breeds of smallholders in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, October 29, 2010.
    Designing Community-Based Breeding Strategies for Indigenous Sheep Breeds of Smallholders in Ethiopia: The case of Bonga Breeds (Bonga Research Center, SARI)
  • 3. Introduction
    • Bonga ARC is located around Bonga town, 450 km South West of AA
    • The region has huge resources on forest coffee, spices, apiculture and indigenous bonga sheep breed
  • 4. Characteristics of Bonga sheep Sheep type - Meat type Coat color -Light and Dark red Tail type – Commonly long thin and fat Average body weight at farmers level Birth weight 3 kg Weaning weight M 18 kg F 14 kg Weight at 6 month M 25 kg F 20 Mature body weight M 40 F 35 Birth type – Commonly twin birth Distribution is all areas of south west Ethio
  • 5. Bonga Sheep
  • 6. Introduction
    • To maximize benefit of the community different programs were initiated and implemented
    • Designing Community based sheep breeding improvement program project is one
    • Since the program initiation still now different activates have been performed
  • 7. What Activities Performed?
  • 8. Activity 1: Sensitizing and selecting farmers
    • Farmers were sensitized about the program by organizing workshops to help them understand about the program
    • Recurrent meetings and Discussion were made with the community
    • Criteria for selection of farmers are:
      • possession of sheep flock
      • willingness to practice in program
    • 127 farmers were selected and engaged in this activity
  • 9.  
  • 10. Program Engaged Farmers participating on Workshop
  • 11. Activity 2. Capacity Building
    • Selected farmers and Two agents (focal persons) were trained on activities:
        • Identifying and tagging lambs at birth
        • How to keep records like date of birth,
        • sex of lamb, birth type, birth wts and 90 wts
    • Agents were well thought and provided with format to fill information and Materials used to measure the data
  • 12. Training on Data recording and Weight Measuring
  • 13. Activity 3. Responsibility Sharing
    • Recurrent work shops and trainings were organized to create awareness
    • All stake holders were informed about the program and hold responsibility
    • Community, Sheep Ranch Center, BoARD and community leaders
    • Regular Follow up and Data collection were made by BARC
  • 14. Activity 4. Ram Selection
    • Selection was based on data and community preference, body weight, birth type, Physical conformation and coat color
    • Selection was made above 90 days up to 180 days of rams
    • 28 best Ram lambs were selected
    • These rams were bought by the program from the farmers and transferred to ranch until they are ready to mate
  • 15. Ram selection
  • 16. Ram selection
  • 17. Activity 5. Dissemination of improved rams
    • Selected first category rams were distributed to participating farmers
    • In first round 13 best rams were distributed
    • This activity made the member farmers trust the program and very happy
  • 18. Selected Rams at Sheep Ranch
  • 19. Selected Rams from Sheep Ranch to Distribution site
  • 20. Achievement of Program
    • Total attitudinal change of community on ram selection
    • Selected community members were trained on health management and safe castration
    • On first round 13 best rams were distributed to 13 different villages of community
  • 21. What to Do next?
    • To select and distribute 60 best rams finally to see each farmer has one ram
    • To form sheep herders cooperatives
    • To give more training on sheep health management and nutrition
    • To expand the program to neighboring sheep herders
    • To assess success of the program by conducting socioeconomic study
  • 22. THANK YOU!!