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Climate and efficiency gains in dairy systems: Pilot project

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Presented by Luke Kessei at the CLEANED Project East Africa Stakeholder Consultation on Dairy and Environment Nairobi, Kenya, 18 September 2013 …

Presented by Luke Kessei at the CLEANED Project East Africa Stakeholder Consultation on Dairy and Environment Nairobi, Kenya, 18 September 2013

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  • 1. Climate and efficiency gains in dairy systems: Pilot project Luke Kessei State Department of Livestock, Kenya CLEANED Project East Africa Stakeholder Consultation on Dairy and Environment Nairobi, Kenya, 18 September 2013
  • 2. INTRODUCTION • The agriculture sector, including livestock, is highly vulnerable to climate change • The sector is responsible for about 30 per cent of Kenya’s GHG emissions as in 2010 • 90 per cent of these emissions are generated by the livestock sub-sector. NCCAP, MARCH 2013
  • 3. Carbon and nitrogen flows on livestock farms e Feeding strategy and additives Livestock Landscape design Soils Agro ecology Manure Manure treatment Feed Export in meat/milk Emissions (CH4,NH3,N03,N20) Treatment (bioenery, composting) Emissions (CO2, NH3, NO3, NO2) Fertiliser (CO2, N2O) Import (CO2,N2O) Emissions (CH4) Gerber, P. et al.
  • 4. Current position of Dairy sub-sector • Kenya has an estimated herd of 3.5 million improved dairy animals • National milk output has risen progressively from 2.8 billion litres in 2002 to 5.2 billion in 2011. • Contributes approximately 4% of Kenya’s GDP. • Source of income and employment to over 1.8 million smallholder dairy farmers. • Additionally creates upto 500,000 direct jobs along the value chain and a further 750,000 in related support services. • Cattle account for 88% of the milk produced while camel and goat account for the rest • The country also has the highest per capita consumption of milk in the African continent (120 lts/person/annum)
  • 5. PURPOSE OF PROJECT • To increase dairy productivity which leads to reduction in GHGE intensity • Generation of carbon credit that will be linked to carbon trade mechanism.
  • 6. OBJECTIVE • To enhance farmers income and food security • To develop a pilot project and methodology that can inform the development of a dairy industry NAMA in Kenya • To provide technical support for the development of technologies that link productivity gains to verifiable emission reductions in smallholder dairy production systems.
  • 7. PROJECT CONCEPT • High-yielding animals producing more milk per lactation generally exhibit lower emission intensities per unit of milk • Reasons:  Emissions are spread over more units of milk. Productivity gains are often achieved through the improved practices (Feeds, Genetics, Herd health) Productivity gains reduces standing biomass per unit of milk produced.
  • 8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRODUCTIVITY & EMISSION INTENSITY OF MILK
  • 9. ACHIEVEMENTS • Stakeholders identified and sensitized • Project site screening & identification done -Nandi(Nandi North) -UasinGishu (Wareng) - Elgeyo Marakwet (Keiyo South) • Technical working group constituted • Baseline study undertaken • Methodology development on - going
  • 10. EXPECTED OUTPUT/OUTCOMES • Stakeholders identified and sensitized • Baseline report • Methodology development • Carbon accounting system developed & in use • Technology transfer
  • 11. CHALLENGES • Data collection: – limited records at farmer level – many small-holders and geo-graphically dispersed • Milk yield as an indicator of GHG intensity • Monitoring trade-offs from project objectives: – Profitability – Risk – Other environmental impacts
  • 12. WAY FORWARD • Methodology to be drafted by the end of this year • Standard finalized over the first half of 2014 • Engage buyers and commence interventions
  • 13. COLLABORATING AGENCIES • MOAL&F • FAO • ILRI • CONSULTING AGENCY(UNIQUE)
  • 14. THE END Thank You!