•  A	
   discrete	
   choice	
   experiment	
   was	
   used	
   to	
   elicit	
   preferred	
   traits	
   of	
  
chicken...
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Assessing economic value of poultry health service and genetic resources in rural Ethiopia

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Poster prepared by Zelalem Gutu Terfa, S. Garikipati, Girma Tesfahun Kassie, J.M. Bettridge, Tadelle Dessie, P. Wigley and R.M. Christley for the Annual Meeting of the Society of Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Madrid, Spain, 20-22 March 2013.


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Assessing economic value of poultry health service and genetic resources in rural Ethiopia

  1. 1. •  A   discrete   choice   experiment   was   used   to   elicit   preferred   traits   of   chicken  in  rural  Ethiopia  in  order  to  inform  design  of  effec9ve  breeding   programmes  and  conserva9on  of  gene9c  resources.     •  A  random  parameter  logit  model  was  used  to  analyse  data  collected   through  a  choice  experiment  survey.   •  Findings  of  the  study  indicated  that  adap9ve  and  produc9ve  traits  and   traits  of  cultural  importance  are  preferred  by  farmers.     •  Important   traits   of   chicken   to   farmers,   according   to   their   value   to   farmers  are  :   •  Mothering   ability   –   good   mothering   ability,   the   ability   to   hatch   op9mum  propor9on  of  eggs  set  for  hatching  and  raise  chicks  are  the   most   important   trait   in   chicken   profile   choice   among   rural   farmers,   while  eggs  per  clutch  was  the  least.     •  Plumage  colour  –  this  is  a  trait  of  socio-­‐cultural  importance.  Farmers   highly  preferred  and  valued  white  plumage  colour,  but  black  plumage   colour  created  disu9lity  to  them.       •  Disease   resistance   –   this   is   an   adap9ve   trait   of   chicken   largely   preferred  and  valued  by  smallholder  farmers.     •  Meat  and  eggs  taste  –  farmers  prefer  chicken  that  has  good  meat  and   egg  taste  and  this  is  among  important  traits  of  chickens        Z.G.  Terfa1,  S.  Garikipa@1,  Girma  T.  Kassie2,  J.  M.  BeEridge3,  T.  Dessie4,  P.  Wigley3  and  R.M.  Christley3     1  Management  School,  University  of  Liverpool  ,  UK;  2ICARDA,  Addis  Ababa,  Ethiopia;     3  Ins9tute  of  Infec9on  and  Global  Health,  University  of  Liverpool;    4  ILRI  ,  Addis  Ababa,  Ethiopia           Abstract     •  This  study  employed  stated  preference-­‐based  valua9on  methods   to  evaluate  Ethiopian  smallholder  farmers’  willingness  to  pay  for   poultry  vaccine  services  and  to  iden9fy  and  value  preferred  traits   of  poultry  for  reproduc9on  purpose.     •  We   found   that   farmers   recognize   the   benefits   of   vaccina9on   programmes  and  are  largely  willing  to  pay  for  it.   •  Analysis  of  farmers’  preference  for  traits  of  poultry  revealed  that   mothering   ability,   disease   resistance   and   traits   of   cultural   significance   are   important   to   farmers.   It   was   also   found   that   farmers  prefer  and  value  a  vaccina9on  programme  that  is  good  at   reducing   disease   severity   and   that   could   be   administered   by   veterinary  technicians.     Fig.2:  A  woman  feeding  her  chickens  Fig.1:  Map  of  the  study  area   •  Analysis  of  CVM  data  for  the  two  hypothe9cal  vaccina9on   programmes  indicated  that  farmers  recognize  the  benefits  of  the   vaccine  programmes  and  are  largely  willing  to  pay  for  it.     •  The  result  from  exponen9al  probit  reveals  that  farmers’  willingness  to   pay  for  village  poultry  vaccine  service  is  influenced  by  whether  farmers   believe  the  vaccine  programme  is  effec9ve  or  not.     •  Farmers’  willingness  to  pay  varied  between  regions.   •  Farmers  who  had  some  form  of  educa9on  were  generally  more  willing   to  pay  while  older  farmers  were  found  to  be  more  reluctant.     •  Farmers’  willingness  to  pay  for  vaccine  services  were  further  explored   using  choice  experiment  for  detail  analysis.   •  Result  from  the  choice  experiment  data  indicates  that  farmers  highly   prefer  vaccine  programmes  that  are:   •  good  in  terms  of  reduc9on  of  disease  severity  for  individual  birds;   •  efficacious  for  a  reasonable  propor9on  of  the  flock,  and;   •  administered  by  veterinary  technicians  (rather  than  by  the  farmers   themselves).                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Conclusions     •  Farmers  are  largely  willing  to  pay  for  a  poultry  vaccine  service,  though  there  was  varia9on  between  regions.     •  A  vaccine  programme  that  is  good  in  reduc9on  of  disease  severity  and  that  could  be  administered  by  veterinary  technicians  is  preferred.     •  Mothering  ability  (ability  to  hatch  and  raise  a  larger  propor9on  of  chicks),  disease  resistance  and  traits  of  cultural  significance  are  important   to  farmers.  This  may  ques9on  the  relevance  of  efforts  focusing  exclusively  on  improved  produc9vity  in  village  poultry  by  targe9ng   specialized  egg  layers.      Methods     •  This  study  employed  stated  preference  approaches,  which  are  commonly   employed  to  value  non-­‐market  goods  in  Environmental  Economics  and  to   asses   demand   for   poten9ally   marketable   products   and   services   in   marke9ng  literature.     •  Both   Con9ngent   Valua9on   Method   (CVM)   and   Choice   Experiment   (CE)   were  used.     •  Hypothe9cal   vaccine   programmes   were   designed   to   elicit   farmers’   willingness  to  pay.   •  A  sta9s9cal  so]ware  programme  was  used  to  combine  traits  of  chickens   to  obtain  chicken  profiles  for  the  CE  survey.     •  Primary  data  were  collected  through  household  surveys.     •  Robust  econometric  methods  were  used  to  analyse  the  stated  preference   data  collected  through  the  CE  and  CVM  survey.     •  The   study   was   conducted   in   2   areas   of   rural   Ethiopia:   Horro   and   Jarso   (Figure  1).   Research  Objec@ves     • Evaluate  farmers’  willingness  to  pay  for  poultry  health  vaccines   • Iden9fy  features  of  vaccine  services  that  farmers  would  prefer,  and   to  value  these  features   • Iden9fy  preferred  traits  of  hens  and  es9mate  economic  value  for   these  traits   Results   Vaccina@on   Preferred  traits  

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