Evaluation of sisal post-harvest waste as a potential bioresource for  production of oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sapidus (...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop                   BackgroundBIOREFINERY: is the technolog...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to    edible valuable mushrooms crop              Challenges to BiorefineryOne of the main ...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop               What is the problem?Scarcity of innovative ...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to   edible valuable mushrooms crop     Demonstrated potential of SPHWSisal post harvest wa...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to  edible valuable mushrooms cropSisal post harvest wastes bioresource.                   ...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible         valuable mushrooms cropSisal post harvest wastes bioresourceMshandete, A....
Poles                                   Sisal Post-harvest waste      Sisal boles including leaf stubs                    ...
From sisal post-harvest wastes to  edible valuable mushrooms cropTechnical   limitations of SPHW  formushroom cultivation....
From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable                 mushrooms cropHow Technical limitations were ADRESSED:*P...
SPHW formulation for mushrooms cultivation in glass bioreactors               •Volume 500 ml, Height 27 cm, Inner diameter...
SPHW formulation for mushrooms  cultivation in I kg plastic bags               *BEST  MUSHROOM SEEDS               rates o...
Conclusions*Mixed SPHW     may be considered a novel substratefor large-scale Pleurotus HK-37 production*For mushroom comm...
Pathways to impact*Knowledge and  skills transfer to mushroomsgrowers and entrepreneurs UDSM has TWO manuals“Department re...
Pathways to impact*Production of high quality MUSHROOM SEEDSMATERIALS FOR GROWERS IN TANZANIA                    MUSHROOM ...
Acknowledgement: Bio-Innovate Regional  Scientific Conference –UNECA, Addis                  Ababa
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Evaluation of sisal post-harvest waste as a potential bioresource for production of oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sapidus (P969) and Pleurotus HK-37)

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Presented by Anthony Mshandete (UDSM) at the First Bio-Innovate Regional Scientific Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 25-27 February 2013

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  • The International Karljohan Foundation Diploma for the “Outstanding Mycological Research of benefit to Society” in celebration of the Linnaeus Tricentennial . “Outstanding Mycological Research of benefit to Society” Award, SwedenDepartment receives the International Linnaeus Tricentennial Diploma from Her Majesty the Crown Princes Victoria of Sweden,
  • Evaluation of sisal post-harvest waste as a potential bioresource for production of oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sapidus (P969) and Pleurotus HK-37)

    1. 1. Evaluation of sisal post-harvest waste as a potential bioresource for production of oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sapidus (P969) and Pleurotus HK-37) ANTHONY MSHANDETE-UDSM First Bio-Innovate Regional Scientific Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 25-27 Feb 2013
    2. 2. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop BackgroundBIOREFINERY: is the technology for Biomassbioresource conversion into useful biomaterialsand/or bio-energy carriers in an integrated mannerand thereby it can maximize the economic value ofthe biomass used while reducing the waste streamsproduced
    3. 3. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop Challenges to BiorefineryOne of the main challenge; Sustainability of biomassresources supply being is ONE of the key issues forthe transition towards the bio-based economy.Therefore the biomass resources needs to beidentified from the perspective of supply anddemand.
    4. 4. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop What is the problem?Scarcity of innovative sustainable technologies andtheir adoption for mushroom production from sisalprocessing industry in Tanzania particularly SPHWcontributes to environmental pollution, emission ofGHG and biological resource wastage.
    5. 5. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms crop Demonstrated potential of SPHWSisal post harvest wastes has beenidentified quantified and characterized as abioresource.SISAL INDUSTRY:Generically discards98% of sisal plantbiomass as waste
    6. 6. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms cropSisal post harvest wastes bioresource. SISAL LEAF REMNANTS WASTE SISAL BOLE WASTESSPHW EACH WEIGHS19=129 KG
    7. 7. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms cropSisal post harvest wastes bioresourceMshandete, A.M., Kibazohi, O and Kivaisi, A.K., (2013).Tanzania sisal industry: Auditing and characterizationof sisal post-harvest wastes as a bioresource forbiorefining. International Journal of Pure and AppliedSciences and Technology. (IN PRESS). Proposedintegrated utilization of sisal post-harvest waste. SEEOVERLEAF
    8. 8. Poles Sisal Post-harvest waste Sisal boles including leaf stubs Chopping, crushing, leachateConstruction extractionmaterialsChopping, drying, grinding Biomass Leachate residueMushroom cultivation Chemical/fermentation processing Mushrooms: To marketsSpent mushroom substrate Inulin, organic acids, ethanol, biogas, etc.Co-digestion with animalmanures for biogas Biogas Biofertilizer to sisal plantations
    9. 9. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms cropTechnical limitations of SPHW formushroom cultivation. SISAL LEAF REMNANTS WASTE SISAL BOLE WASTES
    10. 10. From sisal post-harvest wastes to edible valuable mushrooms cropHow Technical limitations were ADRESSED:*Pre-treatment in water by complete immersion(fermentation) for 10 days*The pre-treated SPHW was used as substrate fabricatedglass SSF bioreactors
    11. 11. SPHW formulation for mushrooms cultivation in glass bioreactors •Volume 500 ml, Height 27 cm, Inner diameter 4.7 cm (r=2.35cm). •Volume (cm3) occupied by mycelia=3.14xr2xh Density =mass (g) of spawn/volume (g/cm3) Colonization rate (mm/day) •THREE SUBSTRATES:RSL (DRIED);SBW (DRIED) MIXTURE RSL (70%):SBW(30%) •FIVE SPAWN RATES % (1.5, 2.5, 4, 5 AND 6.5) 200g moist substrate per glass column • •TWO OYSTER MUSHROOMS (PLEUROTUS HK37,PLEUROTUS SAPIDUS P 969)
    12. 12. SPHW formulation for mushrooms cultivation in I kg plastic bags *BEST MUSHROOM SEEDS rates of 2.5 and 4% of Pleurotus HK-37 *Mixture 30% SBW and 70% SLR *BE of 80-86% *Mushroom yield of 251-270 g/kg moist substrate
    13. 13. Conclusions*Mixed SPHW may be considered a novel substratefor large-scale Pleurotus HK-37 production*For mushroom commercial ventures bioconversionof 25% of the moist substrate into fresh mushroomsis considered profitable.*Based on Mushroom yield of 250 g/kg moistsubstrate (25%), for large scale 2000 bags each2 kg can produce 1000 kg of fresh mushroomsper month.
    14. 14. Pathways to impact*Knowledge and skills transfer to mushroomsgrowers and entrepreneurs UDSM has TWO manuals“Department receives the International Linnaeus Tricentennial Diplomafrom Her Majesty the Crown Princes Victoria of Sweden, OutstandingMycological Research of benefit to Society” Award, Sweden
    15. 15. Pathways to impact*Production of high quality MUSHROOM SEEDSMATERIALS FOR GROWERS IN TANZANIA MUSHROOM SEEDS OYSTER MUSHROOMS MUSHROOM CULTURE
    16. 16. Acknowledgement: Bio-Innovate Regional Scientific Conference –UNECA, Addis Ababa

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