Ethiopian Livestock Feed (ELF) Project: Introducing FEAST

3,916 views
3,830 views

Published on

Presented by Alan Duncan at the Inception workshop for the ‘Fodder and feed in livestock value chains in Ethiopia’ project, ILRI, Addis Ababa, 21-22 February 2012

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,916
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
43
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ethiopian Livestock Feed (ELF) Project: Introducing FEAST

  1. 1. Ethiopian Livestock Feed (ELF) Project – introducing FEAST By Alan Duncan, Inception meeting for the ‘ Fodder and feed in livestock value chains in Ethiopia ’ project ILRI, Addis Ababa, 21-22 February 2012
  2. 2. FEAST <ul><li>The problem </li></ul>
  3. 3. Feed assessment <ul><li>Conventionally focuses on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Their nutritive value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ways of improving nutritive value </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FEAST broadens assessment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is livestock an important livelihood strategy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How important are feed problems relative to other problems? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What about labour, input availability, credit, seasonality, markets for products etc.? </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. How does FEAST work?
  5. 5. PRA <ul><li>General description of farming system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>range of f arm sizes, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>farm labour availability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>annual rainfall pattern </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>irrigation availability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>types of animals raised by households. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>General description of livestock production </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the types of animals raised (% of households raising these animals and average herd/flock sizes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the purpose of raising these animals (e.g. draught, income, fattening, calf production) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the general animal husbandry (including; management, veterinary services and reproduction). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ease of access to credit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How available are necessary inputs – plastic, urea, concentrates etc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Problem identification and potential solutions </li></ul>
  6. 6. Quantitative questionnaire <ul><li>Animals – livestock inventory </li></ul><ul><li>Crops - yields and areas to derive crop residue availability </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivated forages – yields and areas </li></ul><ul><li>Collected fodder: proportion of diet </li></ul><ul><li>Purchased feed </li></ul><ul><li>Grazing: proportion of diet </li></ul><ul><li>Contributors to household income </li></ul><ul><li>Production. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Milk production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sale of livestock </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Seasonality. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Feed supply: overall seasonal availability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is fed in different months? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Sample output
  8. 9. More sample output
  9. 10. Final output <ul><li>Feast report with some ideas for key problems and solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Better links and understanding between farmers, research and development staff </li></ul>

×