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A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?
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A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one?

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Presented by Kees Swaans and Ranjitha Puskur (ILRI) – Nile BDC 'Platforms' Workshop, Addis Ababa, April 8, 2011

Presented by Kees Swaans and Ranjitha Puskur (ILRI) – Nile BDC 'Platforms' Workshop, Addis Ababa, April 8, 2011

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  • 1. A national platform/network for land and water management in the Nile Basin: Why do we need one? Kees Swaans and Ranjitha Puskur (ILRI) – Nile BDC Workshop, Addis Ababa, April 8, 2011
  • 2. Land and water management in the Nile Basin Globalisation (knowledge networks, markets) Institutions (local, national, regional, global) Markets (consumption, supermarkets, integration) Policy (decentralisation, privatisation)
      • Population pressure Climate change
    Intensification Soil erosion Evolving challenges and opportunities Huge implications for the poor
  • 3. Need for innovation
    • I nnovation is something new, what has not been tried before in a certain context
    • Changes in terms of technologies, way of organization, institutions (they way we routinely do things), and policies
    • Hence innovation also refers to a social process involving many different actors
  • 4. Actor landscape
    • Over 140 actors engaged in RWMS (mainly governmental organizations, universities, research institutes, national and international NGOs
    • Few, but potentially useful private sector actors operate in the basin; similarly a few development associations seem to be important
    • 18 loosely organized networks and forums; most focus on broad areas of rural and agricultural development (certain aspects of water such as use or conservation)
    • Over a dozen (mostly) cross-region on-gong and new initiatives
    • (source Ayele et al, 2011)
  • 5. Experiences (implementation)
    • Although recent guidelines and training programs emphasize ‘participation’ of communities, it will take many years to change the dominant culture of the government and change the mind set of communities.
    • People are so constrained in terms of meeting short-term consumption requirements that they cannot wait for benefits that at best accrue only in the future.
    • Lack of policy for management of rain water, so called ‘green water policy’
    • Minimal integration of water management, and management of livestock and agroforestry, and non-availability of low-cost equipment
    • Implementation programs have not been linked sufficiently to research programs
    • (Source: Merrey and Gebreselassie, 2011)
  • 6. Experiences (research)
    • Little systematic comparative research on water management practices and technologies, and the various ways to improve the productivity of water used by crops, livestock and forestry.
    • The outcomes and social and economic impacts of these technologies are not well-researched
    • Gap related to the interactions and synergies among diverse RWM technologies and practices
    • Need for nuanced in-depth local level case studies on local, cultural, social and institutional dynamics
    • Multi-disciplinary participatory action-research on RWM is rare in Ethiopia
    • (Source: Merrey and Gebreselassie, 2011)
  • 7. Why a platform
    • Innovation processes can be enhanced by creating more possibilities for actors to interact
    • For better coordination – strive for complementary and integrated approaches
    • For sharing and learning – how can we do things better
    • For engaging and informing policy makers – to create an enabling environment
  • 8. Platforms as part of Learning alliances Other Districts Local level Regional National Sites within district Non-project sites within district Learning Scaling out Chair Chair
  • 9. Roles of the alliances
    • Advisory
      • Facilitate participatory planning
      • Facilitate scaling up innovations (technical, institutional and organisational)
      • Facilitate ownership/institutionalisation
      • Facilitate an enabling policy environment
    • Learning
      • M&E
        • of process and outcomes
        • of project and alliance activities
      • Specific learning events
  • 10. What needs to be scaled up/out?
    • Principles and methods of stimulating local innovation processes
    • Lessons from experience in supporting institutional change
    • Lessons in building multi-stakeholder partnerships to create enabling conditions for local innovation processes
  • 11. Action Learning
    • A process in which a group of people come together more or less regularly to help each other to learn from their experience.
    • The experience can be something which is taking place, or more often is set up for the occasion. 
    • It is cyclic, involves action and reflection on that action. 
    • Intended to improve practice. 
  • 12. How do you facilitate learning?
    • Periodic meetings and workshops with stakeholders
    • Joint action planning, implementation
    • Exposure visits
    • Learning alliances
    • Platforms
  • 13. Things to define precisely..
    • Why a platform/network?
    • How do we define it – what are we trying to achieve? - clear objectives
    • At what level should it be established?
      • What would their functions be?
      • What would be their membership?
      • Who would facilitate them
    • Format and frequency
    • Communication & policy engagement
    • … .
  • 14. Hoped for outcomes
    • Better information sharing
    • Less duplication of efforts
    • More momentum through shared action
  • 15. Traps we need to avoid
    • All talk no action – need some concrete actions to build momentum
    • Relying on facilitator to “push” action

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