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Galaxy Forum USA 2012 - Jon Lomberg
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  • Closer. A field of dark cinder amid green grass. Spiraling vegetation forms colorful hedges, with a central fountain.
  • 3 Key concepts of Where We Are: First, we live on a planet. Everybody knows that.
  • Our planet is part of a Solar System. Everybody knows that.
  • And our Solar System is a tiny part of the Milky Way Galaxy. Most people do not understand that. The Galaxy Garden is an innovative way of replacing that ignorance with accurate astronomical knowledge.
  • And he has portrayed the Galaxy for many science museums, including the ROM and Ontario Science Center, pictured here, with the artist posing between painted sheets of glass.)
  • The animations were projected onto a screen behind the window of the Spaceship of the Imagination
  • “ Portrait of the Milky Way” by Jon Lomberg, commissioned by the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC in 1992 for the gallery “where Next, Columbus”. This extremely accurate image was developed in collaboration with expert astronomers and has remained accepted by the astronomical community as the most accurate image of our home galaxy ever made.
  • Nebulae in the galaxy form stars that form more nebulae that form more stars-- a cycle eerily reminiscent of biological cycles
  • Nebulae in the galaxy form stars that form more nebulae that form more stars-- a cycle eerily reminiscent of biological cycles
  • Where the spiral arms of nebulae, stars, dust and gas would be symbolized by different plants and flowers.
  • The dots on the leaves of the gold dust croton represent stars.
  • A vocabulary of galactic plants.
  • Lomberg worked with astronomer Leo Blitz of UC Berkeley on adapting Blitz ’s spiral mapping of the Milky Way for the design of the garden.
  • The final map uses the most up-to-date terminology for the structure of our galaxy.
  • Closer. A field of dark cinder amid green grass. Spiraling vegetation forms colorful hedges, with a central fountain.
  • The paths between the arms are cinder, black representing dead stars and red representing the cool red stars that populate the disk. The crunchy sound you make by walking sounds very much like the radio static that comes from space. So you “hear” the galaxy as you explore it.
  • Geography of our galactic neighborhood, shortly after opening. Note globular cluster awaiting placement and planting.
  • The same area now. The short arm on the left is the Orion Arm in which our solar system resides, a tiny dot on a single leaf.
  • This galactic citizen is pointing at the leaf containing the solar system
  • Small stud earrings mark the location of bright stars. The Sun is at the center of a little metal ball. The Sun ’s size would be that of a molecule, to scale.
  • All the stars we see without a telescope are on the same leaf or nearby leaves. The distance to these stars is scaled correctly. All the visible stars in our starry night neighbors only centimeters away.
  • All the stars we see without a telescope are on the same leaf or nearby leaves. The distance to these stars is scaled correctly. All the visible stars in our starry night neighbors only centimeters away.
  • The center of the galaxy. All the cinders are red giant stars, the stone enclosure the galactic bar, and the fountain representing the supermassive black hole at the galaxy ’s center (not to scale; the whole black hole region is about the size of a solar system, sub-microscopic on this scale. We’ve enlarged it because of its importance.
  • The center of the galaxy. All the cinders are red giant stars, the stone enclosure the galactic bar, and the fountain representing the supermassive black hole at the galaxy ’s center (not to scale; the whole black hole region is about the size of a solar system, sub-microscopic on this scale. We’ve enlarged it because of its importance.
  • The fountain uses the conventional gravity well shape to suggest the infall of material and outflow of a galactic jet. Matter orbiting the black hole that approaches too close, falls into an “event horizon” from which it will never emerge.
  • The gravity well and jet reflects in the pool to suggest the bi-directional jets that shoot out of galactic nuclei
  • Closer. A field of dark cinder amid green grass. Spiraling vegetation forms colorful hedges, with a central fountain.
  • The garden shortly after completion. The rolling terrain closely approximates the observed warp in the disk of the Milky Way, now though to be caused by Dark Matter (see Leo Blitz ’s article in Scientific American, October 2011)
  • Some important nearby nebulae, positioned accurately. Ceramic number disks provide the key to identifying the objects
  • A self-guided tour handout provides the curious visitor with a lot of information
  • It still still being used by NASA ’s Kepler Telescope Mission to show the experiment’s search volume relative to the Sun. Astronomers have detected hundreds of exoplanets so far!.
  • A close-up view of our part of the Milky Way
  • All the stars we see without a telescope are on the same leaf or nearby leaves. The distance to these stars is scaled correctly. All the visible stars in our starry night neighbors only centimeters away.
  • Closer. A field of dark cinder amid green grass. Spiraling vegetation forms colorful hedges, with a central fountain.
  • The Galaxy Garden opened in October 2011
  • Visitors included the Directors of the Keck and Subarau observatories on Mauna Kea. The blond woman is the high school teacher who organized out student workers.
  • Our favorite visitors are school groups. Children as young as 3rd grade easily absorb the galactic facts of their existence
  • One teacher had the students form a spiral model of a galaxy with their own bodies. The upraised arm indicates the galactic jet!
  • Kids enjoying the galactic jet
  • Small stud earrings mark the location of bright stars. The Sun is at the center of a little metal ball. The Sun ’s size would be that of a molecule, to scale.
  • Thank you letters
  • Kids enjoying the galactic jet

Galaxy Forum USA 2012 - Jon Lomberg Presentation Transcript

  • 1. THE GALAXY GARDENA New Way of Exploring the Milky Way
  • 2. +
  • 3. .
  • 4. +Portrait of the Milky Way
  • 5. 30 m 1 meter = 3300 light years = ~1 kiloparsec (kpc) 1 cm = ~33 light years
  • 6. AN “AHA!” MOMENT
  • 7. SCIENCE IN THE GALAXY GARDEN
  • 8. KEPLER SEARCH SPACE
  • 9. EDUCATION IN THE GALAXY GARDEN
  • 10. www.galaxygarden.netwww.jonlomberg.com