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ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
ILCC Grant Writing Basics
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ILCC Grant Writing Basics

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A detailed presentation compiled by our VISTA Leader Jim Hurley that tackles the essentials of grant writing including designing a project, identifying key parts of a grant and finding sources of …

A detailed presentation compiled by our VISTA Leader Jim Hurley that tackles the essentials of grant writing including designing a project, identifying key parts of a grant and finding sources of funding.

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  • Broad Problem: General statement. BPs are not a bad place to begin developing your project, but you have to show that it is the consequence of the cause. Real Problem: The underlying cause, where solutions take place.
  • Corporate: - Check board members, advisor committees, and councils for connections- Much more personalized and direct than approaching most other sources. - Think about how your project will benefit the corporationFoundations: - Check annual reports, guidelines for proposals, newsletters, areas of special interest- Check past awardees (most annual reports or PF990s include this information)
  • State and local programs change more frequently and are not well publicized. Also, most are political in nature, so finding out about state and local funding availability becomes a matter of who you know and who you have talked to recently. Most government officials are bound by bureaucratic rules tend to be strict with RFP guidelines. When approaching government funding sources, e-mail is the preferred early contact method. This will help you keep copies of all correspondence.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ILCC Grant Writing Basics Webinar
    • 2. Webinar GoalsI. Idea behind grant writingII. Designing the ProjectIII. Essential componentsIV. Identifying funding sources
    • 3. Why do grantorsfund projects?
    • 4. What are grantors looking for? O Legal status  501(c)3 –tax-exempt nonprofit  509(a)1 - typically schools and museums that receive substantial support from a government unity or the general public O Mission that matters  A clear purpose that supports grantor’s priorities O Good track record  Were you awarded in the past? How did it go? O Leadership  Develop a cohesive and diverse team that is supported by the community O Perks  Incentives or recognition for successful work O Plan
    • 5. Writing Styles Write on a ninth or tenth grade reading level Use laymen’s terms – do not try to impress the reader! Avoid using acronyms, jargon, slang, and contractions To set the tone, try to use terms to portray an image For example: To write a problem statement use depressing, negative terms (worst, lowest, bottom) or for a solution statement use positive terms (best, top, enhance) Use capacity-building type words to show that you are taking action to address the problem(s) (assess, provide, build, serve, develop, integrate, prepare, report, support, coordinate)Research Associates: The Grant Experts
    • 6. Designing the Project A) Define the Problem – fund your solution to a problem Broad Problem: the attention grabber Ex: number of youth incarcerated Real Problem: “the problem is caused by…” Ex: racial inequalities in our justice system funnel poor minority children into prison instead of productive adulthood B) Needs Assessment O Identify the target population – Why here? Ex: 18-25 year old minority males in Illinois O Evidence of the problem in the community Compare gender, race, age, incarceration rate, etc. (surveys, statistics, interviews, past research, input from target population, etc.)Grantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 7. Developing Convincing Problem Statements I. The problem is: II. The problem is caused by: III. The following statistics document the severity of our problem: IV. Long term and without intervention: V. How we will approach the problem:Research Associates: The Grant Experts
    • 8. Problem Statement Tips O Focus your efforts towards one well- defined problem O Write for a person who knows nothing about your community or topic O Relate to your target population O Remember that you will be providing a solution O Something that can be: a) Implemented b) Copied c) Measured
    • 9. Request for Proposal (RFP) Read the guidelines carefully, then read them again. On average, 60% of proposals received by funders are eliminated or first review because he/she did not follow directions! Definition of a legal application Are you eligible? Rules and format margins, font, spacing, evaluation process and restrictions, number of pages Length of the project Submission deadlines, time table Size of the budget Is it worth your time? Use the terms in the RFP Mission/Goal, Need/Problem Contact informationGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 10. Define Mission, Goals, and Objectives A) Mission O Large item, broad, far-reaching solution O Ex: “To improve teaching practices” B) Goals O Realistic, attainable, measureable O Clarify what you want to accomplish C) Objectives O Substeps needed to accomplish your goals O Define minimum measures of successGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 11. Example #1 Goal: To improve production quality QuestionsObjective 1: Recruit O Do the objectives relate to theadvanced production goal?talent O Is it clear what the applicant intends to do?Objective 2: Train mid-level producers O Is there anything else that you think the applicant shouldObjective 3: Upgrade include?production equipment
    • 12. Example #2 Goal: Student Achievement: To assist Illinois high school students in maximizing their academic potential by meeting the Illinois State Academic Standards O Objective 1: To increase the # of students taking the SAT and ACT college entrance exams in CPHS by at least 5% per school year of the grant program O Objective 2: To increase SAT and ACT scores of students in CPHS by at least 5% per school year for the second and third years of the grant program O Objective 3: To increase the percentage of students passing the Illinois Exit Exam in CPHS by at least 5% per school year for the second and third years of the grant programsResearch Associates: The Grant Experts
    • 13. Program Narrative O What will you do with your money? - Goals - Program overview O How are you going to do your project? - Include an advisory committee and collaboration plan - Specific role of your supporting cast O Describe the target population Whom are we targeting for this program – and why? How will we engage them in our program? O How will results be measured? - Activities: a) relate to the problem and b) can be measured - Cite with literature and support O Conclusion: Why is it important? - How the project meets and exceeds the requirements outlined in the RFP? - What you intend to accomplish with your projectGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 14. Evaluation Goals Evidence At least 90% of District teachers will receive training on Evidence of training including dated agendas and technology into the curriculum to improve student rosters learning by 10/11 District students will demonstrate an average District scores in spring 2011 to spring 2012 improvement of at least 10% in academic performance in math as measured by state standards when coming spring 2011 to spring 2012 scoresO Show them that you know what you want to learn!O Even if a plan is not required, you should explain how you intend to judge whether or not your project was successfulO Continuous improvement plan: could the project move towards self-sufficiency?O Plan your project so that each activity is documented; the records can be used to evaluate the projectO Include multiple but achievable ways to assess success using qualitative and quantitative evaluation measures.
    • 15. Dissemination O Let them know that you are making a difference O Project replication O Perks: - do you have a plan to recognize your funder? - plan to generate more resources? O Publications O Use new and existing networks Share your project broadly!Research Associates: The Grant ExpertsGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 16. Budget
    • 17. Budget Categories O Direct Costs: Monies you are asking for in the grant proposal. Ex: personnel, contractual, equipment, materials, supplies, travel O Indirect Costs: Local costs (usually administrative) associated with operating a program. Ex: electricity, room upkeep or the time it takes to maintain records. O In-Kind Contributions: Non-cash contributions. Services, goods, and cash donated to the grant program by you and/or your partners Ex: Is your office space or meeting space donated? Figure out the going rate of square footage divide rate = Match Money O Space rental :482 sq ft. x $8/sq ft.=$3,863.00 Do you have volunteers? Tally how much they would earn doing the same job paid.Stahley Cummings
    • 18. Program Summary O Begins with the overall purpose and goal of the program O No more than one page O Briefly describes the need that the program with address Include any particularly compelling statistics O Outline the proposed program strategies O Briefly addresses project oversight, including evaluation plans Include evaluation with each goal or objective O Ends with anticipated benefit or outcome Leave the reader with a good feelingResearch Associates: The Grant ExpertsGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFunding
    • 19. Researching private funding sources Corporations Foundation Location: Local (sometimes O Location: National, regional, national, regional, or state) state, or large in scope (depends on size and type) Interest: Assisting employees, O Interest: Well-being of promoting their products, training communities, testing new the future workforce, public strategies, disseminating awareness information O Where to find them: The Where to find them: Chamber of Foundation Center (available Commerce, Ward’s Business online and at your local library), Directory, State Business internet searches DirectoryGrantseekers Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to FindingFundingResearch Associates: The Grant Experts
    • 20. Government Grant SourcesO Local governmento City and county governmentso Small and allocated annuallyo Contact your local city or county planning departmentsO State Governmento Simple to moderately complex to applyo Typically distribute smaller awards for one-year fundingo Use an internet search engine and type in your state’s name or a specific state agency. Also search state directories of funding sources.O Federal Governmento Are the most complex, competitive and lengthy type of proposalo Offer larger awards and fund for multiple yearso Listed in www.grants.gov or CFDA (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance)
    • 21. Other SourcesState1) The Grantsmanship Centerhttp://www.tgci.com/funding/state.asp?statename=Illinois&statefile=illinois&statecode=IL&stateurl=http://illinois.gov/2) Illinois State Board of Educationhttp://www.isbe.state.il.us/Federal1) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Servicehttp://www.samhsa.gov/grants/2) Department of Educationhttp://www2.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/grantapps/index.html3) Resource Associateshttp://www.grantwriters.net/latest-grants.php#
    • 22. Finishing TouchesO Required FormsIf requested, provide them at the frontO Table of ContentsInclude a Table of Contents, evenif the RFP does not require oneO AppendixAdditional details information that would be useful for thereviewer (resumes, job descriptions, reference page)O Letters of SupportClearly specify the support that the agency will provide theprogram
    • 23. ResourcesNew, Cheryl C., and James A. Quick.Grantseeker’s Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guideto Finding Funding. Canada: John Wiley & SonsInc., 1998.Certified Grant Specialist. Research Associates,2005.Stahley-Cummings, Melissa. (2011, August 16).Grant Writing Workshop [Powerpoint].AmeriCorps VISTA. Wyoming.

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