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Multiple issues, multiple solutionsDavid Sinclair, International Longevity Centre – UK@sinclairda @ilcuk   The Internation...
Summary  Dr Dylan Kneale  Using data from English   Longitudinal Study of Ageing  What is Social Exclusion and why   ar...
What is social exclusion?    •    Broadest sense  Recognition of         material/non-material link    •    No, Arguably ...
Social Exclusion                             Decent Housing and                              Public Transport             ...
Why might older people be at risk fromexclusion?/multiple exclusion characteristics that are more likely to occur  in lat...
Exclusion from Social RelationshipsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedi...
Exclusion from Cultural ActivitiesThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedic...
Exclusion from Civic Activities/Access toInformationThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan ...
Exclusion from Local AmenitiesThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedicated...
Exclusion from Decent Housing andPublic TransportThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan thi...
Exclusion from common consumergoodsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedi...
Exclusion from financial productsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedica...
Access to banking Almost ten per cent of older people do  not have a current account Among older people surveyed in 2002...
Exclusion up - oldest and ethnic minorities   Between 2002 and 2008, 9.3 per cent of    people aged 80 plus became exclud...
So how has exclusion changed?The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedicated ...
And what about multiple exclusionThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedica...
Exclusion isn’t inevitable by ageThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedica...
What about those not excluded?The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank   dedicated...
Who is most likely to be excluded? Older men were significantly more  likely to be excluded from social  relationships. O...
Who is most likely to be excluded? Wealthy older people are much  less likely to be socially excluded  than their poorer ...
Other trends and key findings  Living together is good for   us  The squeezed middle age  The oldest old remain the   m...
Living together is good for us Those who moved from living alone to living  as part of a couple (with no children) exhibi...
The squeezed middle agePeople in their fifties increasinglyexcluded from society The number of people aged 50 plus  being...
On the other hand – the oldest oldremain the most excluded Almost 38% of those aged 85 or older  faced some kind of socia...
Growth in exclusion fromhousing/transport/amenitiesRates of exclusion from decenthousing and public transport andexclusion...
So what needs to happen? Allocate the task of measuring and  developing strategies to overcome  material and non-material...
So what needs to happen? Better develop outreach provision to reach the  hardest to reach before crises occur. Improve p...
Contact                                    David Sinclair   Assistant Director, Policy and Communications              Int...
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Multiple issues, multiple solutions

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David Sinclair addressing the Foundation Conference http://www.foundations.uk.com/events/hia-annual-conference/annual-conference-2012/conference-2012-programme-overview/ with findings from the recent ILC-UK report: 'Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People?', available at: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/is_social_exclusion_still_important_for_older_people

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Transcript of "Multiple issues, multiple solutions"

  1. 1. Multiple issues, multiple solutionsDavid Sinclair, International Longevity Centre – UK@sinclairda @ilcuk The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  2. 2. Summary  Dr Dylan Kneale  Using data from English Longitudinal Study of Ageing  What is Social Exclusion and why are older people at risk  How has exclusion changed 2002- 2008  Who is most likely to be excluded  Trends and key findings  Recommendations The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  3. 3. What is social exclusion? • Broadest sense  Recognition of material/non-material link • No, Arguably apolitical with a rich academic history • UN, Europe…UK?The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  4. 4. Social Exclusion Decent Housing and Public Transport Civic Activities and Financial Products Access to information Social Local Relationships Amenities Cultural Activities Consumer goodsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  5. 5. Why might older people be at risk fromexclusion?/multiple exclusion characteristics that are more likely to occur in later life, such as disability, low income and widowhood cumulative disadvantage, where cohorts become more unequal over time community characteristics which make older http://www.flickr.com/phot people more vulnerable e.g. population os/driever/5525684658/si zes/m/in/photostream/ turnover, economic decline and crime experience of age-based discrimination. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  6. 6. Exclusion from Social RelationshipsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  7. 7. Exclusion from Cultural ActivitiesThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  8. 8. Exclusion from Civic Activities/Access toInformationThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  9. 9. Exclusion from Local AmenitiesThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  10. 10. Exclusion from Decent Housing andPublic TransportThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  11. 11. Exclusion from common consumergoodsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  12. 12. Exclusion from financial productsThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  13. 13. Access to banking Almost ten per cent of older people do not have a current account Among older people surveyed in 2002 and 2008, fifteen per cent of older people did not report having a current account at both points. Six per cent of older people who reported a current account in 2002 no longer did so in 2008.The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  14. 14. Exclusion up - oldest and ethnic minorities  Between 2002 and 2008, 9.3 per cent of people aged 80 plus became excluded from financial products compared to only http://www.flickr.com/ photos/pondspider/41 2.1 per cent of those aged 50-59. 70990903/sizes/m/in/ photostream/  In 2008, the odds of an older person from an ethnic minority being excluded from financial products were 3 times higher than the odds of a white older person. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  15. 15. So how has exclusion changed?The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  16. 16. And what about multiple exclusionThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  17. 17. Exclusion isn’t inevitable by ageThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  18. 18. What about those not excluded?The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  19. 19. Who is most likely to be excluded? Older men were significantly more likely to be excluded from social relationships. Older women were more likely to be excluded from http://www.flickr.com/photos/d cultural activities. riever/5525684658/sizes/m/in/ photostream/ Being non-white was associated with a higher risk of experiencing some form of exclusion compared to being white (59.8% compared to 47.3%).The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  20. 20. Who is most likely to be excluded? Wealthy older people are much less likely to be socially excluded than their poorer counterparts Becoming a care giver between 2002 and 2008 was associated with a two fold increase in the odds of becoming excluded from two or more domains of social http://www.flickr.com/photos/ sbeebe/5154169795/sizes/m/ in/photostream/The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  21. 21. Other trends and key findings  Living together is good for us  The squeezed middle age  The oldest old remain the most excluded  Growing exclusion from http://www.flickr.com/photos/thousandshipz/4679235/siz housing/transport/ es/m/in/photostream/ amenitiesThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  22. 22. Living together is good for us Those who moved from living alone to living as part of a couple (with no children) exhibited a 68% fall in the odds of becoming multiply excluded between 2002 and 2008 compared http://www.flickr.co to those who stayed living alone; m/photos/anabadili/ 2963913137/sizes/ Those who moved from being resident in a m/in/photostream/ couple household to living alone were over three times more likely to become multiply excluded.The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  23. 23. The squeezed middle agePeople in their fifties increasinglyexcluded from society The number of people aged 50 plus being socially excluded from decent housing, public transport and local amenities has risen sharply Over 1 in 6 people in their fifties were socially excluded in two of more areas– up from 13 per cent in 2002. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  24. 24. On the other hand – the oldest oldremain the most excluded Almost 38% of those aged 85 or older faced some kind of social exclusion, an encouraging decline of 10% from 2002 As people age, they are more likely to http://www.flickr.com/photos /pinkchocolate/3039589789/ become more socially excluded than less sizes/m/in/photostream/ Almost two-fifths (38%) of those aged 85 and older were excluded from two or more domains of exclusion in 2008 The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  25. 25. Growth in exclusion fromhousing/transport/amenitiesRates of exclusion from decenthousing and public transport andexclusion from local amenitiesrose sharply between 2002 and2008 among the populationaged 50 and above as a whole –by over five per cent toapproximately sixteen per cent. http://www.flickr.com/photos/un_photo/5 832685007/sizes/z/in/photostream/The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  26. 26. So what needs to happen? Allocate the task of measuring and developing strategies to overcome material and non-material disadvantage to a specific team within government. Shift the focus of government policy http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwjensen/2 288339230/sizes/m/in/photostream/ on ageing towards prevention. Develop a widowhood strategy.The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  27. 27. So what needs to happen? Better develop outreach provision to reach the hardest to reach before crises occur. Improve planning of neighbourhoods for people of all ages to reduce levels of exclusion from local amenities and decent housing and public transport. Provide additional support for carers and reduce gender inequalities in social exclusion through the expansion of existing intervention programmes.The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  28. 28. Contact David Sinclair Assistant Director, Policy and Communications International Longevity Centre – UK davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk Twitter.com/ilcuk Twitter.com/sinclairdaThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
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