Can the web save social care for bsg
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Can the web save social care for bsg

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This presentation by David Sinclair of ILC-UK asks whether the Web can save social care. ...

This presentation by David Sinclair of ILC-UK asks whether the Web can save social care.

It argues that:
*We have more older people and are going to need more care
*Care is in crisis today. It is likely to get worse before it gets better
*Technology has a role to play
*But we have assumed the place of technology without addressing the barriers
*There are some challenges to overcome

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  • 1. Can The Web Save Social Care? David Sinclair, International Longevity Centre
  • 2. Summary
    • We have more older people and are going to need more care
    • Care is in crisis today. It is likely to get worse before it gets better
    • Technology has a role to play
    • But we have assumed the place of technology without addressing the barriers
    • Some challenges to overcome
  • 3. About ILC-UK
    • The ILC-UK was established in 2000 to explore and address the new longevity revolution and its impact on the life-course and society.
    • It provides the visionary approach needed for individual and societal planning to ensure a progressive, economically viable and socially inclusive tomorrow for all.
  • 4. Some of our publications
  • 5. Numbers with late onset dementia likely to increase
  • 6. More hours of care needed
  • 7. And the cost of care will increase
  • 8. More are living alone
  • 9. We have current unmet need
    • Funding for social care has not kept pace with funding for health care. In the past decade, when the NHS budget has doubled in real terms, social care budgets have increased by only 50%.
    • This has led to local authorities effectively ‘rationing’ care services
    • When care needs go unmet, it is often the NHS that steps in, at great cost, to deal with the consequences.
  • 10. And in the short run
    • Plans for government-wide spending cuts create a £1.75 billion black hole in funding for social care over the next two years according to Age UK.
    • The planned cuts equate to around £900 from social care, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, while the London School of Economics has forecast that an additional £800 million above the existing planned expenditure is required simply to maintain provision at its current levels over the same period, due to the rise in numbers of frail older people.
  • 11. Growing evidence of the cost effectiveness of prevention/early intervention and of technology
    • Popps evaluation found that for every £1 spent on prevention projects, £1.20 was saved
    • Increasing evidence of the impact and value of telecare (but social care only spending £80 million on it at the moment)
    • But is technology really the solution?
  • 12. The role for the internet
    • 133 years ago– first two way phone call made
    • In 2000 – ½ world had never owned a phone
    • By 2007 ½ the world had a mobile phone
    • It took 75 years for telephones to reach 50 million users
    • It took 4 years for the internet to reach 50 million
  • 13. Google knows! Location Based Services
  • 14. My Society/Fixmystreet.com
  • 15. Tripadvisor for Care Homes
  • 16. Ocado for care
  • 17. Web to facilitate active ageing
    • Volunteering
    • Gradual Retirement (slithers of time)
    • Opportunities for fun
    • Opportunities to participate in society
  • 18. Web facilitating access to Information and Advice
    • More confident consumers of care with raising expectations rather than patients
    • More tests available online/instant response (telehealth/care/monitoring)
    • Greater access to information about conditions (accuracy?)
    • Expectations to become more focused on “fix it”, prevent it, cure it?
    • Growth in health tourism. What about care tourism? (Travelodge/recuperation in Spain)
  • 19. Challenge 1: Usability
  • 20. Usability
  • 21. Challenge 2: Motivating and inspiring the older population
    • “ But how much smaller do we want a phone?”
    • Some/many do want new technology but: “I don’t want to live in a smart-home – I’d rather be dead”
  • 22. Challenge 3: Can’t continue to ignore the ethical issues
    • Moral and ethical debates – cant afford to ignore them
    • Must help older people choose technology when it is right for them (tagging/urine tests)
    • Privacy
  • 23. Challenge 4: Technology wont tackle the fundamental problems
    • The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.
    • Bill Gates
    • (Let’s get the basics right first!)
  • 24. Challenge 5: Digital Exclusion
    • Proportion of age cohorts ever having used the internet (Source: ONS)
  • 25. Challenge 6: No culture of private purchase of health/care technologies
    • Personalisation?
    • Access to information and advice?
    • But Health Apps are biggest growth area for Iphone.
  • 26. Challenge 7: The older consumer?
    • “ It is blindingly obvious that there is enormous difference between the seniors of yesteryear and people of the same age today .” Saga 2008
    • We have a wealthy cohort (on average) (and there are more of them)
    • Recent retirees “are more strongly defined by the impact of consumer society on their lives and expectations of post work life than previous generations”
  • 27. A new phenomenon?
    • “ They have fewer ties to family responsibilities... With their homes paid for their major housing concern is for property taxes and repairs... Being essentially free from obligation, they may spend their income and assets as they wish. Here is a potential market, therefore for those marketers who wish to appeal to it. It is a new market, almost unrecognised which must be developed with care as it depends upon the changing role of older persons in our society and the realisation that they are more free than their predecessors in the past century.”
  • 28. A new phenomenon?
    • “ They have fewer ties to family responsibilities... With their homes paid for their major housing concern is for property taxes and repairs... Being essentially free from obligation, they may spend their income and assets as they wish. Here is a potential market, therefore for those marketers who wish to appeal to it. It is a new market, almost unrecognised which must be developed with care as it depends upon the changing role of older persons in our society and the realisation that they are more free than their predecessors in the past century.”
    Dodge, 1962
  • 29. So..
    • We have more older people and are going to need more care
    • Care is in crisis today. It is likely to get worse before it gets better.
    • Technology has a role to play
    • But we have assumed the place of technology without addressing the barriers
    • Challenges to overcome (research gaps remain)
  • 30. Contact
    • David Sinclair
    • Head of Policy and Research
    • International Longevity Centre – UK
    • [email_address]
    • Twitter.com/ilcuk
    • Twitter.com/sinclairda