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08May14 - Community Matters: Are our communities ready for ageing?

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As the population ages, an increasing number of people will be growing older and continuing to live in communities around the country. Many of our communities are ill-prepared for both the varying …

As the population ages, an increasing number of people will be growing older and continuing to live in communities around the country. Many of our communities are ill-prepared for both the varying needs of older people ageing in place and the future increase in numbers of older people who will need appropriate housing, transport and services. The local elections in May also bring these issues into focus for elected representatives who will be seeking to prepare their areas for these challenges and give the best opportunities for good ageing to their constituents.

At this event we heard results of a series of three solutions-focussed policy discussions held by ILC-UK and Age UK. These discussions have looked at three distinct aspects of communities – from living at home, to getting out and about and the activities and amenities available (or missing) in our communities. We will be discussing a forthcoming report summarising the fresh thinking and practical suggestions for policy makers, local government and community groups gathered from these sessions.

The conference also included sessions on research and information on this topic, and what needs to be done to take action in our communities. All sessions will feature opportunities for attendees to participate in the discussion and add their views on where priorities for action should be focussed.


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  • 1. Community Matters: Are our communities ready for ageing? Thursday 8th May 2014 #communitymatters
  • 2. Malcolm Dean #communitymatters
  • 3. Caroline Abrahams Charity Director Age UK #communitymatters
  • 4. Baroness Tyler Member of the Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change #communitymatters
  • 5. Questions #communitymatters
  • 6. Jessica Watson Policy and Communications Manager ILC-UK #communitymatters
  • 7. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Community Matters: Getting our communities ready for ageing Jessica Watson, International Longevity Centre – UK @ilcuk #communitymatters
  • 8. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. ILC-UK Planning Tomorrow, Today  think tank  evidence based  policy focussed  independent  respected  experts  international  life course  intergenerational
  • 9. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. ‘Community Matters’  ILC-UK and Age UK  Policy seminars – At home – Getting out and about – Ensuring communities offer what older people want  Briefings  Public event  Final report to be published late May
  • 10. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Today  Stock check – ageing in our communities  Highlighted findings  A challenge for today
  • 11. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Stock check – ageing in our communities
  • 12. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Ageing in our communities  3.6 million people living alone  1 million+ feeling always or often lonely  Just over ¾ people aged 65+ live in rural areas  31.8% of homes where oldest person aged 75+ fail the decent home standard ONS (2013). Families and Households, 2013. (http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/family-demography/families-and-households/2013/stb-families.html#tab-Living- alone); Age UK (2014) Over a million older people in the UK regularly feel lonely. Available at: http://www.ageuk.org.uk/latest-press/over-1-million-older-people- in-uk-feel-lonely/; Beech et al (2014). Population Ageing & the Voluntary Sector: Key Figures & Projected Trends; English Housing Survey Housing Stock Summary statistics 2009, July 2011 http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/statistics/xls/1937429.xls Table SST3.4
  • 13. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Ageing in our communities  Wealthiest retired households have four times the disposable income of the poorest retired households  £5 compared to £2,700 a head invested in transport in the North East compared to London Riba (2014). Silver Livings. The Active Third Age and the City.; IPPR North (2011). Capital Gains: An analysis of the Autumn Statement announcements on transport infrastructure.
  • 14. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Stock check – rates of social exclusion From Kneale (2011) Is Social Exclusion still important for older people? ILC-UK. http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/is_social_exclusion_still_important_for_older_people
  • 15. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Looking ahead  91% of baby boys in East Dorset and 94% in Purbeck will live to 65 – Glasgow City figures are 85% baby girls and 75% baby boys*  Current divorce rates are higher in the 45-54 age group than any other  Trends away from ‘retiring to the seaside’? But rural ageing faster http://0.tqn.com/d/geography/1/0/C/H/uk.jpg *Based on 2010/12 mortality rates persisting. ONS (2014). Life Expectancy at Birth and at Age 65 by Local Areas in the United Kingdom, 2006-08 to 2010-12
  • 16. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Highlighted findings  “Do we have to say this again?”  The top of the hierarchy  Community capacity  Social responsibility  Changing hearts and minds  Fun and playfulness
  • 17. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs
  • 18. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Community capacity – making the most of it  People and their time – Do we need to commission ‘neighbourliness’  Resources – Sharing investments in community transport – e.g. the uno bus scheme in Hertfordshire – Car sharing schemes – a working model in the USA  Available space – Housing built for ‘yuppies’ – very age friendly! – Vacant spaces for groups to meet
  • 19. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Social responsibilities  Some good schemes already in place – e.g. dementia friendly retail  Retail is a changing landscape  All high street players have a responsibility to put something back in towards an age-ready community – even if it’s an untraditional role for the company
  • 20. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Changing heart and minds  Reject the image that being housebound ends your involvement with your community  Ban the older people crossing road sign  Getting the unusual suspects involved  Activities for older people
  • 21. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Fun and playfulness  Fun, joy and playfulness – culture change needed for people to feel ‘allowed’ to continue being playful  E.g. The Park Street slide in Bristol http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk- england-bristol-27274501
  • 22. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. A challenge for today
  • 23. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Ebbsfleet Garden City  Announced by the Chancellor in the March 2014 Budget  Initial plans for 15,000 homes  “A proper garden city” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-26600689 and http://www.triathlonbusiness.com/2012/industry-news/tristar-milton-keynes-splashdown-in-the-uk/
  • 24. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Ebbsfleet Garden City  No commitment for affordable housing  Nearby: – National and international rail station – Large shopping mall (Bluewater) – Road links – A2 and M25 – Near to the Thames – Theme park planned
  • 25. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Age-ready Ebbsfleet? http://ebbsfleetgardencity.org/ebbsfleet-garden-city-plans-and-maps
  • 26. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Age-ready Ebbsfleet? http://ebbsfleetgardencity.org/ebbsfleet-garden-city-plans-and-maps
  • 27. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Age-ready Ebbsfleet? http://ebbsfleetgardencity.org/ebbsfleet-garden-city-plans-and-maps
  • 28. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 29. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Age-ready Ebbsfleet?  Your thoughts?  What’s in (and what’s out)? – Housing design – Transport options – High street shops – Primary healthcare – Care facilities – Schools – Leisure facilities including hotels
  • 30. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Many thanks Jessica Watson Policy and Communications Manager International Longevity Centre-UK jessicawatson@ilcuk.org.uk 02073400440 Twitter: @ilcuk #communitymatters
  • 31. Open Discussion #communitymatters
  • 32. Refreshment Break #communitymatters
  • 33. Susan Davidson Research Adviser Age UK #communitymatters
  • 34. Improving Later Life. Services for older people: What works Susan Davidson, PhD Research Adviser Age UK
  • 35. Purpose and aims For developers, providers, commissioners, and funders of services for older people. What research tells us ‘what works’ about services for older people. Short summaries in lay languages, with further reading noted.
  • 36. Authors Foreword: The Lord Filkin, CBE Introduction: Sandie Keene, President of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services Author recruitment: • Age UK sources and contacts • National Institute for Health Research’s School for Social Care Research • New Dynamics of Ageing Programme
  • 37. Short summaries on what works • Service cost-effectiveness • Integrating health and care • Dignity • Safeguarding • Assessment • Carers • Personal budgets • Loneliness and social isolation • Telehealth • Older men • Rural communities • Housing • Falls • Dementia
  • 38. Seven overarching messages 1. Service design and delivery should be based on what older people say they want and need. 2. Carers play a vital to the success and sustainability of interventions. 3. There should be thorough and regular assessments of the needs of both older service users and their carers. 4. Service design should incorporate from the start a robust evaluation system and a broad and long-term view of likely costs, cost savings and sustainability.
  • 39. Seven overarching messages 5. Benefits for older people and carers are likely to go beyond the narrow focus of a particular service. Service providers should value -- and make use of - opportunities for additional benefits. 6. Completion of tasks should not be the only criterion by which a service is judged. For example, social interaction is often valued as highly by older people. 7. Some services are suited to all potential users, but thought should be given to suitability for specific groups such as older men.
  • 40. Thank you! Download the pdf from: www.ageuk.org.uk/what-works Please feel free to contact me: Susan Davidson, PhD Research Adviser Age UK susan.davidson@ageuk.org.uk
  • 41. Professor Sheila Peace Professor of Gerontology Open University and President Elect of the British Society of Gerontology #communitymatters
  • 42. Community Matters : are our communities ready for ageing? Sheila Peace, Professor of Social Gerontology, The Open University/President Elect British Society of Gerontology The Evidence Base ILC-UK/AgeUK Thursday May 8th
  • 43. The Research Evidence Base Research Initiatives • ESRC – Growing Older (1999-2003) • RCUK – New Dynamics of Ageing (2005-2013) • KT-EQUAL EPSRC (2009-2013) • JRF – A Better Life: Valuing Our Later Years (2009-2013) • MRC/RCUK – Life Long Health and Wellbeing(2011-2015) (Enhancing mobility & independence in an ageing population)
  • 44. The Research Evidence Base Research Characteristics • Multi-disciplinary Teams • Collaboration across HEIs • User Involvement • Participatory Research • REF – Units of Assessment • Impact – Case Studies
  • 45. Co-Design Methods • EVOLVE tool – housing design for people with sight loss • Future Bathrooms • Cycle BOOM • Go Far/ I’DGO projects • Transitions in Kitchen Living • Social Interaction in Urban Public Places • Older People’s use of Unfamiliar Places • Grey and Pleasant Land? Rural Ageing
  • 46. Research Dissemination • HousingLIN • Housing and Care for Older People Research Network • http://www.housinglin.org.uk/AboutHousingLIN?HCOP RN/ • All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care • DCLG group • International Urbanisation and Ageing Population Network (IUAPN) • UK AFC Network
  • 47. Open Discussion #communitymatters
  • 48. Lunch #communitymatters
  • 49. David Sinclair Assistant Director, Policy and Communications ILC-UK #communitymatters
  • 50. Tracey Robbins Programme Manager, Neighbourhood approaches to lonliness JRF #communitymatters
  • 51. Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness The tale of two cities
  • 52. WHAT Loneliness is…. • A mismatch of the relationships we have and those we want • An internal trigger telling us to seek company as thirst tells us to drink and hunger tells us to eat and tiredness tells us to sleep • Loneliness describes the pain of being alone as solitude describes the joy of being alone • Isolation is often where there is no choice but to be alone • Some people seek solitude, but few choose to be lonely, primarily because it isn’t good for us
  • 53. Loneliness and social Isolation • People experiencing isolation require practical help and resources (such as transport provision). • People experiencing loneliness require social support and extended social networks, (e.g. befriending, networking, friends) There are also different types of loneliness which again may require different interventions: emotional loneliness and social loneliness. • Emotional loneliness is the absence of a significant other with whom a close attachment is formed (a partner or close friend). • Social loneliness is the lack of a wider social network of friends, neighbours or colleagues • We need to tailor our response to the needs of the individual Emotional and Social Loneliness
  • 54. WHY LONELINESS • Addressing Loneliness and Isolation it will result in stronger communities in which members of all ages play a greater role • Addressing it will improve and result in stronger partnership working and a more holistic approach • Reducing loneliness and isolation will help to address health inequalities
  • 55. WHY LONELINESS • An increase in Loneliness = an increases the use of expensive health and social care services • Demographic change could increase the problem • Reducing loneliness and isolation will contribute to peoples well being thus achieving a number of health and wellbeing board priorities
  • 56. • Loneliness has an effect on mortality - twice as likely to die prematurely • It is also associated with poor mental health and, more surprisingly, with conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and dementia • “Loneliness is a public health issue that should be tackled urgently, There are links with early death. The risk factor is similar to smoking and worse than obesity”” Laura Ferguson, Director of the Campaign to End Loneliness.
  • 57. WHAT: Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness • Place based approach to loneliness • Working with people in their neighbourhood to explore what contributes to feelings of overwhelming/problematic loneliness • Exploring factors like location, health and wellbeing, safety, independence, life transitions • ABCD approach to developing and putting into practice local ideas and activities to reduce the effects of loneliness • Making every contact and conversation count
  • 58. Some of the many PLA tools used …. to get people talking… to feed back ideas
  • 59. • Recruited, trained and retained 32 community researchers in Participatory Learning and Action in all four neighbourhoods • Community researchers gathered information, undertook outreach and all fieldwork and analysis and spoke to over 100 stakeholders • Talking to over 2000 people gathering 7667 individual comments New Earswick 182 New Earswick 311 493 Carr estate 193 Carr estate 282 475 Bradford Moor 176 Bradford Moor 292 468 Denholme 143 Denholme 304 447 694 1189 1883 Local people leading the way
  • 60. Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness
  • 61. What are the issues affecting people in the four neighbourhoods
  • 62. • Members of the neighbourhoods came up with over 1000 ideas to reduce loneliness • An average of 65 ideas were prioritised in each neighbourhood and shared with community partners and local stakeholders • Community researchers in the neighbourhoods have done planning, negotiation and project management training • Each neighbourhood has reduced (not easy!) these ideas to 5 priorities which they are now putting into practice • Community researchers are now activists – sharing the key messages via 1000 conversations Turning ideas into actions
  • 63. Key messages • Loneliness kills people and communities • Regulation kills kindness and reduces action • Lonely people are vulnerable, this is a safeguarding issue • Building personal and community confidence builds resilience
  • 64. Key messages • The stepping stones to engagement and education need to be put back • There is a real contradiction between society’s ideals and individual experience • You can take the ideas out of the process. You cannot take the process away from the ideas
  • 65. Anyone can be lonely, even busy people. Anyone can reduce loneliness – their own or others • How do we make every contact count? • How do we look after the health and wellbeing of our communities, colleagues and ourselves? • How do we give the gift of time when we lead such busy lives? • How do we resource prevention in hard times? • How do we ensure that our community assets are community hubs used to their full potential and open to all? • Let’s see how we can all talk about loneliness Wot… no time ?
  • 66. Free online loneliness resource pack • This resource pack brings together the lessons and experiences from the programme and includes: • Living with loneliness? – a four-page summary of the causes of loneliness, with infographics; • Let’s talk about loneliness – a four-page summary of ideas and actions to reduce loneliness, with infographics; • Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness: our stories – a collection of case studies from some of the people involved; • Working with your community to address loneliness – top tips from our external evaluators; • Can do – guidance and tips for negotiating community action; • How you can reduce loneliness in your neighbourhood (the process); • Let’s talk about loneliness session plans – five one-hour group work sessions to get you thinking and talking about loneliness. • Lets talk about loneliness - a short film featuring interviews with the communities involved in our research
  • 67. Culture of – You’re on your own Holistic approach – you’re not alone (we really are all in it together)
  • 68. Pam Turpin Senior Research Analyst Arup #communitymatters
  • 69. Foresight + Research + Innovation69 Wellbeing and Interdependence through Assisted Living Pam Turpin Senior Research Manager, Foresight + Research + Innovation Arup 8th May 2014
  • 70. Foresight + Research + Innovation70 Working for Arup We support our practices and businesses through thought leadership, foresight research, delivering workshops, and facilitating conversations. Working with Arup We aim to be an integral part of project teams, helping to deliver unique professional services through the integration of foresight and research into projects. Working Externally to Arup We provide foresight and innovation management consulting services to external clients with a focus on trend research, innovation processes, workshops, and lectures. Foresight + Research + Innovation Services
  • 71. Foresight + Research + Innovation71 Context: An Aging World Source: http://www.sarsaparillablog.net/an-aging-world-how-do-aging-populations- differ-across-countries-2/:
  • 72. Foresight + Research + Innovation7272 Source: Global AgeWatch Index, 2013
  • 73. Foresight + Research + Innovation73 Consequences by 2050 Dementia COPD Diabetes Heart Disease Cancer Sensory Loss
  • 74. Foresight + Research + Innovation74 Consequences by 2050 Source: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GAC_GlobalPopulationAgeing_Report_2012.pdf
  • 75. Foresight + Research + Innovation75 Independent Life?.............. ...so what do people need to enable it?
  • 76. Foresight + Research + Innovation76 Age-friendly Communities Housing Social Participation Respect and Social Integration Civic Participation and Employment Communication and Information Community Support and Health Services Outdoor spaces and buildings Transportation Source: WHO Guide to Age Friendly Communities Smart, age-friendly communities can help this happen? A liveable community is one that has affordable and appropriate housing, supportive community features and services, and adequate mobility options, which together facilitate personal independence and the engagement of residents in civic and social life
  • 77. Foresight + Research + Innovation77 “That it will ever come into general use notwithstanding its value, I am extremely doubtful; because its beneficial application requires much time and gives a good bit of trouble both to the patient and the practitioner.” —London Times in 1834, describing the stethoscope Role of Technology
  • 78. Foresight + Research + Innovation78 Telecare Remote or enhanced delivery of health and social care services to people in their own home using ICT. Telecare is most effective if used as part of a package of support that is accepted by the individual and their formal and informal caregivers.
  • 79. Foresight + Research + Innovation79 Telehealth Delivery of healthcare at a distance using ICT to exchange information for diagnostics, treatment and prevention or diseases
  • 80. Foresight + Research + Innovation80 Health Apps Use of apps to support lifestyle choices, manage chronic conditions, update e-Heath records
  • 81. Foresight + Research + Innovation81 M-Health Use of mobile devices in delivering heath and social care.
  • 82. Foresight + Research + Innovation82 Social benefits from using ICT
  • 83. Foresight + Research + Innovation83 Getting out and about
  • 84. Foresight + Research + Innovation84 Transport
  • 85. Foresight + Research + Innovation85 “The multidisciplinary field of human factors aims to understand the properties of human capability to inform the design, development and implementation of systems and services. It uses theories, principles and tools from various domains including industrial design, engineering, psychology and anthropology.” —Charness et al: 2010 Human Factors
  • 86. Foresight + Research + Innovation8686 Engaging with older people Benefits of engaging older people For organisations: •To ensure their products and services are fit for purpose. •To improve relationships with the community •To demonstrate understanding of older people’s wants and needs •To find ways to engage with “difficult to reach” groups For older people: •To be able to have a say in issues that affect them •To gain an increased sense of purpose, ownership or usefulness •To benefit by learning and developing new skills •Increased confidence and enjoyment of life
  • 87. Foresight + Research + Innovation8787 Trends in Housing developments Multigenerational Housing Co-housing Eco-housing
  • 88. Foresight + Research + Innovation8888 Dementia Dementia Village attached to Care Home in Bristol, UK Dementia Village in Hogewey, Amsterdam . Dementia friendly Community, Helmsdale, UK
  • 89. Foresight + Research + Innovation89 Conclusions Key Considerations: 1. What is the impact of the built environment on the mental health of older people? 2. Do behavioural change programmes increase the use of technology in health and social care? 3. How can smart city planners ensure the development of liveable communities? 4. What are the optimum designs for transport systems for older people and those with disabilities? 5. How can we design cities to favour mixed communities? 6. What are the most effective interventions for increasing older urban dwellers’ contact with nature and how does this affect wellbeing? 7. How could street lighting be improved to optimise vision in older people and those with visual challenges? 8. What type of accessible walkways would help increase physical exercise and the social integration of older people? 9. Could autonomous vehicles solve transport difficulties experienced by older people?
  • 90. Foresight + Research + Innovation90 Thank you pam.turpin@arup.com
  • 91. Lynne Berry Commission on Voluntary Sector and Ageing #communitymatters
  • 92. Dr Alan Burnett Chair Portsmouth Pensioners Association #communitymatters
  • 93. ILC / AGE UK Conference THU 8th MAY Communities Matter Are our ‘communities’ ready for aging? Dr. Alan Burnett
  • 94. Taking action in communities Involving Older people A. How can/should older people be informed/involved/influential in shaping their localities? B. What is the experience of PPA in creating an ‘age friendly’ city on the South Coast of England? A tale of strategies, surveys and street Stalls
  • 95. alanburnett@live.co.uk COMMENTS / QUESTIONS? pompeypensioners.webplus.net
  • 96. Open Discussion – what should be the priorities for action? #communitymatters
  • 97. Cheryl Coppell Chief Executive Havering Council/Centre for Ageing Better #communitymatters
  • 98. Cheryl Coppell Chief Executive, London Borough of Havering Trustee Director, Centre for Ageing Better
  • 99. 2013 the BIG Lottery Fund approved the investment of £50 million to develop the Centre for Ageing Better. BIG intends the Centre to be a world-leading hub to apply and promote evidence of what makes for a better quality of life in older age to help empower people to stay active, healthier and happier for longer. The Centre is an entirely independent charity that will work actively with a wide range of stakeholders to shape its work and make change happen. This investment is a unique opportunity to help make a step improvement in the lives of older people and maximise the benefits of our ageing society.
  • 100.  Lord Filkin – Chair  Katherine Rake – Chief Executive Healthwatch England  Professor Tom Kirkwood – Newcastle University Institute for Ageing and Health  Professor Gillian Leng – Deputy Chief Executive NICE  Helena Herklots – Chief Executive Carers UK  Michele Acton – Chief Executive Fight for Sight  Professor Michael Catt – ALERE Research and Development  Cheryl Coppell – Chief Executive London Borough of Havering
  • 101. We are in our set up phase…. • The Board submits a business case to BIG to draw down the £50m in July • Hopefully BIG approves the submission and transfers the £50m by the Autumn • The work really gets underway!!
  • 102. Enough to prove to BIG we can use the money wisely Not a level of detail that is inappropriate given the scale of the task, the thoughtfulness needed to embark upon it and the stakeholders we need to consult and engage with on the journey Hopefully the right balance….
  • 103. Until we access the full endowment we are working on initial set up funding A skeleton staff – including one very hard working Interim CE The knowledge we can garner from consultation and engagement with our stakeholders The knowledge and expertise of our Board
  • 104. Consultation paper issued to 180 organisations. Feedback welcomed to the questions raised on no more than 2 sides of A4. Please respond to sara.coakley@agebetter.org.uk By 30th April 2014. Paper can be accessed at: www.centreforageingbetter.com
  • 105. What is our vision? ‘A society in which we all have a better later life’ . What is our mission? “Improving later life through evidence of what works’.
  • 106.  Positive  Person centred  Rigorous  Accessible  Distinctive  Independent
  • 107.  Individuals who are empowered and enabled to maintain their well being in later life;  Communities that support and are enriched by older people;  Services and products that better meet the needs and aspirations of older people;  Public attitudes and policies that support and improve the well being of older people.
  • 108. Synthesising Sharing Seeding Scaling
  • 109.  Focus the debate on how we can maximise the benefits of ageing  Bring evidence into practice, using others to do our research syntheses.  Use our strategic position to catalyse others to focus on issues that matter, to work together to synthesise and generate evidence and apply it and to commit to bring about change.  Partner with researchers, funders and organisations to achieve change.
  • 110.  The public including older people, their families and carers  Communities  Service commissioners and providers  The voluntary sector & social entrepreneurs  The private sector  Policy makers  Funders  Other organisations working with and for older people
  • 111.  Valuing older people  Preparation and planning for a better later life  Sustaining activity and independence in later life  Increasing opportunity and extending working lives  Local planning and commissioning for better later life  Maximising community engagement to improve later life  Stimulating sectors, markets, investment and innovation to improve later life  Developing an age sensitive culture and environment
  • 112. • It’s a huge field and we need to be thoughtful and take time to get it right as we want to engender long term change • We will exemplify a couple of fields of enquiry for the business case to BIG • Hopefully become fully operational and fully staffed • Move on to more detailed and wider engagement and work once the Centre is fully established
  • 113. More detailed thoughts on one of these areas……. Maximising community engagement to improve later life
  • 114. Can be defined as ‘informal and formal action by the community, voluntary or business sector either with ‘communities of interest’ or at the neighbourhood-level. It can support healthy ageing by complementing (a) action taken by individuals or their families and (b) integrated health and social care commissioned by statutory agencies’. The term ‘community engagement’ is often used loosely and an understanding of ‘what works ‘ is often muddled and imprecise. Task is to clarify ‘what works with whom in what circumstances’ in order to - inform commissioners & increase confidence to invest - improve outcomes for older people - reduce demand and cost to statutory bodies
  • 115. • Older people's definition of well being: • Social relationships, varyingly expressed as ‘being connected’, maintaining social contacts, social activity, ‘engagement with the outside world’ and interacting with others • Social capital, by which is meant the social resource of home and neighbourhood, family and friends. • Keeping active, seen by many as a key concept to wellbeing
  • 116. • Continuing to adopt the usual deficit model is unlikely to help • Adopting an asset based approach could be much more productive • As well as building social capital and increased self determination
  • 117. 1. Preparing for healthy ageing in mid life 2. Creating conditions for independent living 3. Preventing loneliness and inactivity 4. Supporting people with chronic illness including dementia 5. Reducing preventable hospital admissions So we need to know …
  • 118. • What community-level interventions are effective? What is the strength of evidence / likely impact? • How easy is it to reach target groups in different types of place? • How do these interventions deliver their impact? They may be ‘packaged’ differently but what are the common success criteria? What conditions have to be in place for them to succeed? • Are they good value for money? Are there some approaches that impact on 2 or more objectives? • Could they be incorporated into local systems and replicated at scale? • What light touch national, regional or local infrastructure is needed to develop and support them?
  • 119. ……So that the system works as a whole and is simple to understand, implement and monitor. It is important to be clear about • who is responsibility for ensuring the system works well • what actions need to be taken by whom • the conditions that need to in place for each intervention to work
  • 120. • Village Agents (Gloucestershire) • Community Connectors (Leeds) • Care Network (Cambridgeshire) • Social Prescribing (Birmingham) • Rural Community Councils (National network) • Councils for Voluntary Service (National)
  • 121. One of the new Centre’s role will be to synthesise ‘what works’ knowledge. This should set out how specific types of community intervention can add value to action taken by: individuals and their families and the statutory agencies so that policy objectives are achieved.
  • 122. • We need to work with all our stakeholders for this to be successful • We need to pick the things that we can do that will really make a difference • Please respond to our consultation document!
  • 123. Questions #communitymatters
  • 124. Community Matters: Are our communities ready for ageing? Thursday 8th May 2014 #communitymatters